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Jsa2u
01-24-2009, 08:28 AM
Today I was playing a match and I hit a ball down the line(in) and from across court my opponent called it out. Clearly the ball was on the the line (more in than out). I was 8 ft from the net at most and my op. was on the opposite line. What should happen? I tried to tell him it was in and that shot put me in a tye breaker in which I lost. It sucks!:???:

LeeD
01-24-2009, 08:41 AM
Happens all the time in tournaments.
Can't tell you how to deal with it emotionally, but you gotta deal.
One possible good thing.... you'll know how screwed up that is and won't do it to the next guy.
Me, I got screwed maybe 20 times in a finals C tournament, my first one. Since it was the finals, there were over 200 spectators. Nobody helped. Couple weeks later, a bunch of B and low A players asked me to hit with them. They saw how I took the bad calls, and decided I was someone worthy of practicing with, even though I wasn't their level yet.
Always good to be a good guy.

ten10
01-24-2009, 09:23 AM
That is SO annoying, but Lee is right. Happens a lot really--especially when a match gets tight. And I think most people believe what they think they see.

If your ball was out though, and the other guy couldn't call it--would you call it on yourself?? I would.

I believe if it is your call to make, you can ask your opponent if they saw it and could call it in our out--but then you have to accept their answer--even if it isn't in your favor.

spot
01-24-2009, 10:11 AM
thats his call because its on his side of the court. You can ask if he was sure but thats it. If they insist that they are sure then there is nothing you can do except to play better in the tiebreak next time.

tennisdarren
01-24-2009, 10:23 AM
My best memory of something like this was as soon as the guy hooked me in the first game, he had the reputation, I went to my bag and put my racquet down. He asked what I was doing and I told him "I'm going to get a referee." he completely melted down before I even left, he threw his racquet into the fence and screamed bloody murder! when I got back with the ref he couldn't even keep a ball in play. Some times if you call a cheater on his actions it takes care of its self.

blakesq
01-24-2009, 04:18 PM
Which is it? First you say the ball is clearly on the line, then you say "more in that out". Sounds like you aren't very sure yourself. Reasonable people can honestly disagree on line calls. If your opponent is constantly making bad calls, then you have something to complain about. But if it is ONE call, and you even say you thought it was "more in that out", then it sounds like your opponent was honest. Oh, and it is the opponent's call.


Today I was playing a match and I hit a ball down the line(in) and from across court my opponent called it out. Clearly the ball was on the the line (more in than out). I was 8 ft from the net at most and my op. was on the opposite line. What should happen? I tried to tell him it was in and that shot put me in a tye breaker in which I lost. It sucks!:???:

JavierLW
01-24-2009, 04:25 PM
Which is it? First you say the ball is clearly on the line, then you say "more in that out". Sounds like you aren't very sure yourself. Reasonable people can honestly disagree on line calls. If your opponent is constantly making bad calls, then you have something to complain about. But if it is ONE call, and you even say you thought it was "more in that out", then it sounds like your opponent was honest. Oh, and it is the opponent's call.

I dont think he meant that as that he was unsure.

I think that he means that the ball hit the line, and that more of it was on the line then was outside of the line.

He's still saying it hit the line, he's just trying to paint a picture of how clearly "in" that shot might of been (versus seeing a ball that you "clearly" saw just barely knick the line).

This is an easy one though, no matter how clear the call was, everyone should know it's his opponent's call to make.

I think the majority of the time the caller is just making "wishful calls" more then anything. It's not cool that they are like that, but to get mad as if they are blatantly cheating is sort of pointless.

Jim A
01-24-2009, 07:18 PM
sometimes being emotional helps, if its close and I'm in a better spot to see it, I'll toss out a "yeah" or fist pump to drive the point home, can't hurt..

if I play with someone who hooks and I've asked them 1-2x if they are sure, I'll buzz them a little...not the most mature but either is hooking

mikeler
01-24-2009, 07:51 PM
Playing adult matches, this rarely happens to me anymore. As a junior, I played one guy who made that same bad call that you referenced 3 times in about 3 games. I finally called one of his 2nd serves out that landed in the middle of the box. We screamed at each other for a few minutes, he threatened to get the ref and I still did not concede the point. It was the first point of the game. He was ****ed, but I had no disagreements with him the rest of the match. I realize that I should have gotten the tournament ref before doing something like this, but the guy was way better than me so I just felt like ruffling his feathers.

JavierLW
01-24-2009, 08:26 PM
sometimes being emotional helps, if its close and I'm in a better spot to see it, I'll toss out a "yeah" or fist pump to drive the point home, can't hurt..

if I play with someone who hooks and I've asked them 1-2x if they are sure, I'll buzz them a little...not the most mature but either is hooking

That may be true, although let's say you are making good calls. You clearly see the ball go out (even by a little tiny bit) yet your opponent is getting all emotional about it everytime because in his mind it was in.

Dealing with people who get loudly emotional about every close ball is sometimes as annoying as dealing with someone who makes bad line calls. (and sometimes they are the same)

Im not saying that's you though, I understand what you are trying to say. The problem Ive had is a lot of my opponents THINK they are responding in the same manner but they actually suck at making line calls.

It gets to the point where I dread it anytime the ball is close and I have to call it out because "here comes the drama....."

Like I said most people who make bad calls are not really purposely screwing you.

They are just not following the rules fairly enough and I think something in their brain wants the ball to be out, so if it's close they call it out. (funny thing is many times these same people will complain when you call a close ball out)

ten10
01-25-2009, 05:46 AM
sometimes being emotional helps, if its close and I'm in a better spot to see it, I'll toss out a "yeah" or fist pump to drive the point home, can't hurt..

Again, SO annoying. If it is close you should let your opponent make the call before any needless fist pumps and audibles. Otherwise I see that as a form of bullying.

Jim A
01-25-2009, 07:55 PM
guys, I'm not a bully, my point was purely that if the OP was playing someone who was hooking him or making calls from far away that sometimes you have to sell it to keep them from making that call. Typically I might do it 1x/match
I hate drama peeps as much as the next person and can't stand when someone gives you the "Are you sure" when they are 10' behind the baseline and still hit it out by nearly a foot.

Since tennis for me is purely social/fun/enjoyable if I play people who hook or are idiots, I just move on to play others. I'll avoid them in a ladder until playoffs or if we meet down the road at a tournament/league match. Great thing about this sport since so many play.

burosky
02-02-2009, 02:03 PM
Bad calls will always be there. The most you can do is ask if your opponent is sure about the call. You may opt to get a line judge if one is available but that will not make any difference with the call in question. Personally, I learned it is better to just give my opponent the benefit of the doubt. It helps me move on and focus on the next point.

I want to share one incident though. On one of the local tournaments many years ago, there was this heated match where apparently one player was hooking the other like crazy. For the most part the other player let it slide and to his credit maintained focus until he got match point. When the "hooker" faulted on his first serve the other guy blurted "you might as well not bother with your second serve because I'm calling it out right now". Sure enough he did. Of course the "hooker" argued about it because he made sure his second serve went in and it did. The other guy just left the court and reported their score. The "hooker" tried to appeal to the tourney officials but there's nothing they can do. I don't condone either behavior but It was quite a spectacle. I bet the "hooker" learned his lesson.

GeoffB
02-02-2009, 02:50 PM
sometimes being emotional helps, if its close and I'm in a better spot to see it, I'll toss out a "yeah" or fist pump to drive the point home, can't hurt..

if I play with someone who hooks and I've asked them 1-2x if they are sure, I'll buzz them a little...not the most mature but either is hooking

Body language is important. One guy who watched my match told me that I "concede" close calls to my opponent by acting like the ball is out when it was too close to call (on his side). His advice was to project confident body language and walk purposefully to the other side of the court to serve or receive.

That seems like a good idea. You can go too far with it, though. A fist pump or a "yeah" on a ball that you sure is good seems fair and square to me, but to do to influence a call on a ball you think might be out... seems like gamesmanship.

And, of course, there's the opposite of the Hooker - the intimidator. I give away too much on line calls, so I almost never get in arguments. The only time I did was when I played an opponent who was clearly using intimidation to get close calls. This is a tactic. Any time you call a close ball out, you'll get a long, hard, cold look from these players, along with an aggressive "are you sure" or "was that close?". They know very well the ball was out, but they're trying to intimidate you into yielding calls that are close but still distinctly out.

Every time he did this, I said "are you challenging the call?" He'd never give me a yes or no answer. Instead, he'd say "it looked close to me". And each time, I'd reply "would you like to get a lines judge?" which surprisingly enough, he didn't want to do.

Ultimately, fighting too much over this is like wrestling with a pig - you both get dirty and the pig enjoys it. So even if you call them on it, you are kind of playing into the hooker/intimidator's hands. The most important thing is to get back to the match and stay focused - but without allowing them to use you as a doormat.

Mada
02-02-2009, 03:39 PM
Bad calls will always be there. The most you can do is ask if your opponent is sure about the call. You may opt to get a line judge if one is available but that will not make any difference with the call in question. Personally, I learned it is better to just give my opponent the benefit of the doubt. It helps me move on and focus on the next point.

I want to share one incident though. On one of the local tournaments many years ago, there was this heated match where apparently one player was hooking the other like crazy. For the most part the other player let it slide and to his credit maintained focus until he got match point. When the "hooker" faulted on his first serve the other guy blurted "you might as well not bother with your second serve because I'm calling it out right now". Sure enough he did. Of course the "hooker" argued about it because he made sure his second serve went in and it did. The other guy just left the court and reported their score. The "hooker" tried to appeal to the tourney officials but there's nothing they can do. I don't condone either behavior but It was quite a spectacle. I bet the "hooker" learned his lesson.

Haha that is perfect.