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aimr75
01-26-2009, 03:44 AM
I have been struggling with developing consistency with the forehand.. it can tend to go in the net but also go long.. mostly though it tends to go in the net. I use an eastern grip.. should i keep working on improving my current forehand with the eastern grip or try a SW in an attempt to produce more spin?

here is a video taken with the camera at the net position:

http://www.vimeo.com/2964788

im getting frustrated as i feel my improvement is very slow.. i dont know whether i can expect great improvement with how much i play, but i try and get out at least twice a week

[osu]ilovecows
01-26-2009, 04:50 AM
To be honest, your form is actually not that bad. Do try to pay a little more attention to your footwork though, you get a little flat footed sometimes. Also, your stance is really open for a eastern grip (it's hard to tell from the video, you might even be using a mild SW). Try stepping into the court more with your front foot, and get a good knee bend.

It is possible to hit a good eastern forehand with an open stance, but I think if you focus on stepping into the court and driving through the ball with a low to high finish, you're get the results you're looking for. And don't forget to bend those knees! Other than that, things look pretty good. Keep working at it!

Nellie
01-26-2009, 08:03 AM
A couple of thoughts:

1) your footwork is inconsistent because you sometimes hit off the right leg (with a wieght shift to the left leg, which is good), sometimes off the left leg (with wieght shift prior to contact/swing, which is bad because you are only arming the swing since the rotational energy is lost). I sense you do this because you are out of position, and to improve, you need to take a couple more small steps prior to contact to be able to hit from a more consistent position/form.

2.) Your left arm is dangling during the shot. You use it to bring back the racquet, and then drop it during the rest of the stroke. This will throw off your balance and also cost you a lot of power. Try catching the racquet for a couple of days to feel what it is like to get the shoulders in the shot.

3.) I would suggest getting your racquet lower prior to contact and increase your low to high motion to get more top spin. I think anyone struggling with ground strokes consistency should slow down their strokes (hit higher, medium effort shots with more topspin for greater margins of error). As your consistency improves, you can flatten out and hit with more pace, but go for consistency first.

soyizgood
01-26-2009, 08:20 AM
Maybe you can simplify your forehand. I started doing that with mine recently. At least for me:

1. Apply less arm force on the shot
2. Moderately close racquet face on takeback
3. Shorter takeback
4. No concern about my stance (usually neutral and at times semi-open)

That frees my body to step into the shot and I feel more confident about the control, pace, and direction I'm getting.

LeeD
01-26-2009, 08:28 AM
First of all, you look relaxed and nonchalant. If that's the way you want to play, then hit lots more balls and get good. Your strokes are fine, your posture is pretty good mostly.
One thing I see not mentioned.... You're crowding the baseline, and have trouble with the deep short hop groudies. I'd suggest you stand back 2' farther to hit more normal groundstrokes. Short balls, you hit low and strong. Deep balls, seem sprayed up and down.
It's nice to see a somewhat traditional form of hitting, so if you like to dictate points and hit for winners, keep your strokes but try harder, get lower, turn sideways more, and mainly, swing faster on your backhand.
Once again, your strokes are fine.

The_Steak
01-26-2009, 10:17 AM
Eastern is continental right?

SaunderS
01-26-2009, 10:22 AM
great vids of the AO by the way!

Bungalo Bill
01-26-2009, 10:22 AM
Eastern is continental right?

Nope, Eastern is Eastern and Continental is continental.

http://www.tennis.com/yourgame/gear/general/general.aspx?id=649

Jonny S&V
01-26-2009, 10:29 AM
First of all, you look relaxed and nonchalant. If that's the way you want to play, then hit lots more balls and get good.

Once again, your strokes are fine.

It's better to be relaxed then too tight.

You have well grooved strokes, but I would loosen up your wrist on the forehand and let the racquet head drop a little more below the ball. You could get more variety out of your forehand (which seems like a very reliable looking stroke to me), but you might want to bend the knees a little more on the low balls.

oneguy21
01-26-2009, 10:53 AM
It would be better if you put the camera behind you. I cannot understand why no one does that!

On your forehand, try to have early preparation, this could really help with your consistency. Also, bring your left arm up and place it just below your eye level. This will help you maintain good balance. Always remember to keep your eye on the ball until contact with the strings. I also noticed you have a classic follow through. This is alright, but if you want to develop more spin and consistency, take a look at some lessons on the windshield wiper forehand on Youtube by FYB.

That bachand of yours is sweet! Excellent finish.
Ballinbob take a look at his backhand!

Bungalo Bill
01-26-2009, 12:29 PM
I have been struggling with developing consistency with the forehand.. it can tend to go in the net but also go long.. mostly though it tends to go in the net. I use an eastern grip.. should i keep working on improving my current forehand with the eastern grip or try a SW in an attempt to produce more spin?

here is a video taken with the camera at the net position:

http://www.vimeo.com/2964788

im getting frustrated as i feel my improvement is very slow.. i dont know whether i can expect great improvement with how much i play, but i try and get out at least twice a week

Hi Aimr75,

Work on the following:

ALL SHOTS
1. Knee bend and use of the toes for balance and effort for your angular momentum to go into the ball.

2. Learn to stay on your toes. Left foot seems a little lazy and a bit weak so strength it by using thoe terri-bands, etc...

3. Step out can be improved on both sides. Not strong enough.

FOREHAND
1. Keep your non-dominant arm extended more and longer as you bring the racquet forward. If you move all the way to the end of your video, you will see both your racquet arm and your non-dominant arm apart and "hanging down". When you are in your followthrough, I would prefer for now that you learn to bring it to your non-dominant hand and into the ready position quicker.

2. Non-dominant arm needs to be more involved and fold back into the body better for now so you can feel how it helps you with your acceleration.

3. More shoulder turn: Front shoulder goes under the chin. Lower your stance and get more involved in your stroke. You have a tendency to want to rotate away from the ball which I think is largely because of you lack of knee bend and your non-dominant arm.

4. Stay on your toes and eliminate the heel to ground touch as much as possible.

ONEHANDED BACKHAND
1. Your setup footwork is too slow and in many cases you take way too many steps when a ball is hit toward you. Watch Blake and then compare to yours on similar balls.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

2. On some balls (not all of them) you rose a bit too soon (extended leg). That is a timing thing you need to continue to work on.

3. I liked your long L pattern and you looked like you were trying to go through the ball.

4. On some shots there was only a light effort in transferring weight over your front foot.

5. Need a bit more shoulder rotation.

6. Nice smile pattern.

Racer41c
01-26-2009, 01:06 PM
Hi Aimr75,

Work on the following:

ALL SHOTS
1. Knee bend and use of the toes for balance and effort for your angular momentum to go into the ball.

2. Learn to stay on your toes. Left foot seems a little lazy and a bit weak so strength it by using thoe terri-bands, etc...

3. Step out can be improved on both sides. Not strong enough.

FOREHAND
1. Keep your non-dominant arm extended more and longer as you bring the racquet forward. If you move all the way to the end of your video, you will see both your racquet arm and your non-dominant arm apart and "hanging down". When you are in your followthrough, I would prefer for now that you learn to bring it to your non-dominant hand and into the ready position quicker.

2. Non-dominant arm needs to be more involved and fold back into the body better for now so you can feel how it helps you with your acceleration.

3. More shoulder turn: Front shoulder goes under the chin. Lower your stance and get more involved in your stroke. You have a tendency to want to rotate away from the ball which I think is largely because of you lack of knee bend and your non-dominant arm.

4. Stay on your toes and eliminate the heel to ground touch as much as possible.

ONEHANDED BACKHAND
1. Your setup footwork is too slow and in many cases you take way too many steps when a ball is hit toward you. Watch Blake and then compare to yours on similar balls.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

2. On some balls (not all of them) you rose a bit too soon (extended leg). That is a timing thing you need to continue to work on.

3. I liked your long L pattern and you looked like you were trying to go through the ball.

4. On some shots there was only a light effort in transferring weight over your front foot.

5. Need a bit more shoulder rotation.

6. Nice smile pattern.

Great comments BB. Your a class act.

Bungalo Bill
01-26-2009, 01:31 PM
Great comments BB. Your a class act.

haha, thanks I appreciate it! However, some may differ with you about the "class act." ;)

aimr75
01-26-2009, 03:58 PM
thanks to all for your replies.. have taken them on board

also BB, thanks for the detailed post.. this is great stuff



ALL SHOTS
1. Knee bend and use of the toes for balance and effort for your angular momentum to go into the ball.

2. Learn to stay on your toes. Left foot seems a little lazy and a bit weak so strength it by using thoe terri-bands, etc...

3. Step out can be improved on both sides. Not strong enough.



with point 2, can you tell me in which instances you refer to with the left foot being lazy and weak? i want to look out for it on the vid to see what you mean. will see what i can do about strength exercises and fitness overall as i need improvement there

I have never really practiced footwork, so will need to address the patterns, such as using the step out etc.. i have seen the youtube vids you posted once, so will work on these, along with your point on knee bend and staying on toes. I can see i dont get down on the ball for practically all shots



FOREHAND
1. Keep your non-dominant arm extended more and longer as you bring the racquet forward. If you move all the way to the end of your video, you will see both your racquet arm and your non-dominant arm apart and "hanging down". When you are in your followthrough, I would prefer for now that you learn to bring it to your non-dominant hand and into the ready position quicker.

2. Non-dominant arm needs to be more involved and fold back into the body better for now so you can feel how it helps you with your acceleration.

3. More shoulder turn: Front shoulder goes under the chin. Lower your stance and get more involved in your stroke. You have a tendency to want to rotate away from the ball which I think is largely because of you lack of knee bend and your non-dominant arm.

4. Stay on your toes and eliminate the heel to ground touch as much as possible.



with points 1 and 2, you mean to catch the racquet on follow through? i assume this should help with tucking the non-dominant arm in?

point 3, the rotating away from the ball i notice i tend to do, especially on deeper shots, it does result sometimes in shanks as i pull away.. my shoulder rotation is something i have been conscious of, but as seen in the vid, still not executed.. i feel like sometimes in the follow through rotation, in an attempt to square my shoulders more to the net at contact i lose timing. with the shoulder turn on the backswing, i will work on the non-dominant arm and staying low



ONEHANDED BACKHAND
1. Your setup footwork is too slow and in many cases you take way too many steps when a ball is hit toward you. Watch Blake and then compare to yours on similar balls.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

2. On some balls (not all of them) you rose a bit too soon (extended leg). That is a timing thing you need to continue to work on.

3. I liked your long L pattern and you looked like you were trying to go through the ball.

4. On some shots there was only a light effort in transferring weight over your front foot.

5. Need a bit more shoulder rotation.

6. Nice smile pattern.


in point 1, yeah, that one step motion is great of blakes, my backhand is no way near consistent enough to be able to execute it with that footwork. I will work on setting up quicker

point 2, thanks for this, i hadnt noticed that.. so i should only really extend in certain instances only after the ball has been hit?

with point 4, sometimes i do get a bit tentative with the shot and the result is i dont put my weight into it.. i am still trying to develop confidence in the stroke. This tends to happen when i start missing a few backhands, i back off and just guide it over the net

i notice also, my bad shots with the backhand go in the net, i assume this is due to lack of knee bend and not getting under it with the low to high?

point 5, is this just a need to get more side on to the ball, or literally i need to turn my shoulders with my stance as is?

with 6, thanks i have been working on a simple take back.. i have been practicing bringing the racquet back with my shoulder turn and not my arms..

Ballinbob
01-26-2009, 04:01 PM
i'll trade you backhands.

I'll throw in an overgrip too

Whadd'ya say?

aimr75
01-26-2009, 11:07 PM
i'll trade you backhands.

I'll throw in an overgrip too

Whadd'ya say?

hmm tempting :)

Djokovicfan4life
01-26-2009, 11:44 PM
Make sure that you are getting set up with your right leg behind the flight path of the ball BEFORE it bounces, whenever possible. On many shots you are arriving late and your balance and recovery suffer as a result. Using a cadence, such as "Hit-Bounce-Hit" can really help with this.

featherlight
01-27-2009, 06:24 AM
try using your left hand during your stroke

ssjkyle31
01-27-2009, 06:36 AM
I thought your strokes are fine, pretty fluid. It looks like you were really concentrating on your foot work and working on your anticipation.

Bungalo Bill
01-27-2009, 07:49 AM
thanks to all for your replies.. have taken them on board

also BB, thanks for the detailed post.. this is great stuff

with point 2, can you tell me in which instances you refer to with the left foot being lazy and weak? i want to look out for it on the vid to see what you mean. will see what i can do about strength exercises and fitness overall as i need improvement there

There isnt an instance that is pronounced that you can "see" it. It is subtle and involves your stepout, your step into the ball, and your recovery. Just work on it.

I have never really practiced footwork, so will need to address the patterns, such as using the step out etc.. i have seen the youtube vids you posted once, so will work on these, along with your point on knee bend and staying on toes. I can see i dont get down on the ball for practically all shots

You need to move in more of an athletic stance. I am not too picky on how low, but given that you occasionally bend your knees well on shots, I would move to a more pronounced athletic stance to strengthen the quads and calves so you can improve your endurance in this area.

For toes, yes, you need to get over the balls of your feet and move more from them. You need much less heel to ground contact. Heel to ground contact slows you down and is a killer when trying to change directions.

Watch Federer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVwPRKh1Mdk

with points 1 and 2, you mean to catch the racquet on follow through? i assume this should help with tucking the non-dominant arm in?

Yes. you dont have to keep doing this as you progress. This is an exercise to help increase involvement of your non-dominant arm. Just look at how you finished at the last frame.

You are not terrible in this area, it is just for my taste, I would rather see club players get into the ready position and recover qucker maybe than others.

point 3, the rotating away from the ball i notice i tend to do, especially on deeper shots, it does result sometimes in shanks as i pull away.. my shoulder rotation is something i have been conscious of, but as seen in the vid, still not executed.. i feel like sometimes in the follow through rotation, in an attempt to square my shoulders more to the net at contact i lose timing. with the shoulder turn on the backswing, i will work on the non-dominant arm and staying low

Players need to setup with their legwork. Plant and then turn INTO the ball. Extension is important because it helps to provide feedback that the players sent their energy through the ball. Many times we dont do this because we nervously try to move back into position too soon - so we cheat ourselves on our shouder rotation for the stroke. First off, if a player is thinking of moving back too soon, they are not concentrating on the ball well. Their eyes may glance away from the ball too soon, etc...without them knowing it.

Finish your stroke, place your front shoulder unders your chin, then move thatback shoulder back into the ball. To help reduce "cheating" back to the recovery position so you can relax through your shot, make sure you chose the right shot to hit to begin with, and be more aware of your shot selection mistakes.

An example of a shot selection mistake can be one where you try to do something with the ball (hitting DTL) to put pressure on your opponent only to find he is putting pressure on you because of the shot you chose. Rotate through the ball, use your shot to (pace, placement, selection) to give yourself a chance to recover to a closer position (hitting crosscourt) on the court.

in point 1, yeah, that one step motion is great of blakes, my backhand is no way near consistent enough to be able to execute it with that footwork. I will work on setting up quicker

No excuse, this is footwork. You need to work on it. You need to work just as hard on your footwork as you do your stroke. Your footwork is everything. It is your foundation for balance, execution of the stroke, your timing, and your recovery.

point 2, thanks for this, i hadnt noticed that.. so i should only really extend in certain instances only after the ball has been hit?

Just keep doing what you are doing. The long L for a onehander is something I watch for. Many club players think they are Federer and so they start turning the wrist to impart topspin. They try to duplicate the WW wiper pattern of the forehand. Sometimes they hit a great shot which gives them a false sense that they mastered this movement. I am more concerned with your racquet face meeting the ball on time and cleanly then I am imparting a bit more topspin. Just extend naturally through the ball, you are doing fine, dont overthink it. You have other things to work on which is why I said I liked what you are doing.

with point 4, sometimes i do get a bit tentative with the shot and the result is i dont put my weight into it.. i am still trying to develop confidence in the stroke. This tends to happen when i start missing a few backhands, i back off and just guide it over the net

No tentativeness allowed for a onehanded backhand. That would really spell doom.

i notice also, my bad shots with the backhand go in the net, i assume this is due to lack of knee bend and not getting under it with the low to high?

Could be a lot of things.

1. Starting and finishing above the ball too much.

2. Not tranferring the weight quick enough (hitting more off your back foot or inbetween).

3. Coming up to fast on your swing to impart topspin.

4. Contact point.

point 5, is this just a need to get more side on to the ball, or literally i need to turn my shoulders with my stance as is?

You need to turn your shoulders more.

with 6, thanks i have been working on a simple take back.. i have been practicing bringing the racquet back with my shoulder turn and not my arms..

That is good. Just do a little more shoulder turn and be consistent with that and you will be fine in this area. Not a biggy.

tennisfreak15347
01-27-2009, 11:23 AM
I don't know if anyone has said this yet, but you're pulling your racquet-head over your shoulder too fast.. It looks like you are consciously trying to do an over-the-shoulder finish, which is significantly shortening your stroke, and constricting your power. let the stroke naturally allow the racquet to follow through.

aimr75
01-27-2009, 06:07 PM
There isnt an instance that is pronounced that you can "see" it. It is subtle and involves your stepout, your step into the ball, and your recovery. Just work on it.



You need to move in more of an athletic stance. I am not too picky on how low, but given that you occasionally bend your knees well on shots, I would move to a more pronounced athletic stance to strengthen the quads and calves so you can improve your endurance in this area.

For toes, yes, you need to get over the balls of your feet and move more from them. You need much less heel to ground contact. Heel to ground contact slows you down and is a killer when trying to change directions.

Watch Federer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVwPRKh1Mdk



Yes. you dont have to keep doing this as you progress. This is an exercise to help increase involvement of your non-dominant arm. Just look at how you finished at the last frame.

You are not terrible in this area, it is just for my taste, I would rather see club players get into the ready position and recover qucker maybe than others.



Players need to setup with their legwork. Plant and then turn INTO the ball. Extension is important because it helps to provide feedback that the players sent their energy through the ball. Many times we dont do this because we nervously try to move back into position too soon - so we cheat ourselves on our shouder rotation for the stroke. First off, if a player is thinking of moving back too soon, they are not concentrating on the ball well. Their eyes may glance away from the ball too soon, etc...without them knowing it.

Finish your stroke, place your front shoulder unders your chin, then move thatback shoulder back into the ball. To help reduce "cheating" back to the recovery position so you can relax through your shot, make sure you chose the right shot to hit to begin with, and be more aware of your shot selection mistakes.

An example of a shot selection mistake can be one where you try to do something with the ball (hitting DTL) to put pressure on your opponent only to find he is putting pressure on you because of the shot you chose. Rotate through the ball, use your shot to (pace, placement, selection) to give yourself a chance to recover to a closer position (hitting crosscourt) on the court.



No excuse, this is footwork. You need to work on it. You need to work just as hard on your footwork as you do your stroke. Your footwork is everything. It is your foundation for balance, execution of the stroke, your timing, and your recovery.



Just keep doing what you are doing. The long L for a onehander is something I watch for. Many club players think they are Federer and so they start turning the wrist to impart topspin. They try to duplicate the WW wiper pattern of the forehand. Sometimes they hit a great shot which gives them a false sense that they mastered this movement. I am more concerned with your racquet face meeting the ball on time and cleanly then I am imparting a bit more topspin. Just extend naturally through the ball, you are doing fine, dont overthink it. You have other things to work on which is why I said I liked what you are doing.



No tentativeness allowed for a onehanded backhand. That would really spell doom.



Could be a lot of things.

1. Starting and finishing above the ball too much.

2. Not tranferring the weight quick enough (hitting more off your back foot or inbetween).

3. Coming up to fast on your swing to impart topspin.

4. Contact point.



You need to turn your shoulders more.



That is good. Just do a little more shoulder turn and be consistent with that and you will be fine in this area. Not a biggy.

thanks alot for the detailed responses.. there are many things to work on.. will have to try focus on maybe a couple of aspects each time i go out as it could get overwhelming thinking about all the points mentioned.

aimr75
01-27-2009, 06:09 PM
I don't know if anyone has said this yet, but you're pulling your racquet-head over your shoulder too fast.. It looks like you are consciously trying to do an over-the-shoulder finish, which is significantly shortening your stroke, and constricting your power. let the stroke naturally allow the racquet to follow through.

i dont know if its a conscious thing, but will concentrate on the aspects mentioned in other posts and will see whether a flow on effect occurs as a result of

user92626
01-29-2009, 09:30 AM
That is good. Just do a little more shoulder turn and be consistent with that and you will be fine in this area. Not a biggy.


I know that you're supposed to turn the shoulder for takeback, but is turning the shoulder plane back/in reverse to the net as part of the forward swing an important factor (something you must do for power and consistency)?

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 09:50 AM
Love that Federer video, BB. Is that little recovery move at around 0:37 called a reverse crossover, by any chance? I've heard that term used before.

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 09:58 AM
FOREHAND
1. Keep your non-dominant arm extended more and longer as you bring the racquet forward. If you move all the way to the end of your video, you will see both your racquet arm and your non-dominant arm apart and "hanging down". When you are in your followthrough, I would prefer for now that you learn to bring it to your non-dominant hand and into the ready position quicker.



This reminds me of a great method I've heard before of teaching the modern forehand from Heath Waters, of www.virtualtennisacademy.com.

He teaches the back-swing and follow-through as a "figure 8", so to speak, with the back-swing as one side of the figure 8, and the follow-through back into the ready position as the other half. Of course, there are other important fundementals that need to be focused on as well before attempting this, but I thought that was a great way of putting the forehand into terms that are very easy to understand.

LeeD
01-29-2009, 11:48 AM
Remember OP is using Eastern forehand...
I'd read and try to understand all BBill says, but for me, it's too detailed and I can't use my brain for such a long time.
But, Eastern forehands absolutely needs full shoulder turns, and mostly needs full closed stances, stroke moderately low to high, and NOT a WW followtru for consistency. It's an earlier (older) stroke than full W or SW, so don't think you can apply SW thinking into a flatter, Eastern forehand.
REALLY pay attention to body posture during the swing. Margin for error on Eastern forehand is much less than SW or W, so you have to pay attention more.
The reward is an easier swing with more pace.
Whether to shift to SW or not is up to you.
But MORE EFFORT is mandatory to get out of your rut. Lazy doesn't cut the mustard in this league. More effort means turning shoulders, moving feet, bending knees, and everything BungalowMan said!
Most of the vids, not all, are of extremely lazy tennis players. You gotta get on your horse and make things happen!

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 11:51 AM
I know that you're supposed to turn the shoulder for takeback, but is turning the shoulder plane back/in reverse to the net as part of the forward swing an important factor (something you must do for power and consistency)?

Yes, but for the onehanded backhand it will brake from your non-dominant arm going back or staying by your side. This allows the arm to fly through.

For the forehand, the brake is your non-dominant arm folding back into the body width. This again allows your arm to accelerate more through the contact zone.

aimr75
01-29-2009, 02:36 PM
i have been reading the thread on grips here: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=242296

is it worthwhile even looking at possibly going to a semi western at this stage for the forehand considering the other things that need to be addressed, or should i not mess with the grip and work on the things mentioned such as the non-dominant arm, rotation, knees etc?

smoothtennis
01-29-2009, 02:44 PM
My initial impression was that one, your forehand (and BH) looks pretty fine from a technical standpoint. And two, what I think may cause you some issue is that you are not bending you knees very much, ie, 'sitting in the chair.' This will help get your racket under the ball as some have mentioned, and will add to your kinetic chain.

LeeD
01-29-2009, 02:50 PM
Bear in mind, if you switch to SW or W forehand, you need to swing much harder, meaning better base with quicker shoulder turn, standing back some, moving your feet, all that extra work, for just the forehand side.
Your natural movement does fit SW forehands, but you don't put nearly the effort to make the stroke effective. Tough decision there. You already don't put enough effort. Going to SW forehand needs MORE effort on your part....you need to swing faster because you impart more topspin on each forehand. A mild topped forehand is totally ineffective above 3.5. A strong, oval, hissing forehand works great all the way up. But it takes maybe 40% more effort than you have shown.
I made the switch somewhere around 35 years old. Still not as consistent or effective as my old Eastern forehand, and it's been like 15 years...

smoothtennis
02-02-2009, 08:36 AM
I made the switch somewhere around 35 years old. Still not as consistent or effective as my old Eastern forehand, and it's been like 15 years...

If it's been 15 years, and your switch to SW is STILL less consistent and EFFECTIVE - why in the world are you still staying with it? This makes no sense to me?

LeeD
02-02-2009, 09:25 AM
Hey, I never said I was smart !!
Maybe I want to look like I hit forehands like the kids nowadaze.
Maybe I want to emulate the average stroke of the current pros.
Maybe the current balls are bouncing around my shoulder heights and above.
Maybe as my hitting skills get better, my old age and injuries also get worst!
Maybe it's just plain ole fun to hit out on forehands, without holding back, and still have them go in.
Maybe I just can't find the old Eastern/cont forehand grip anymores.

Djokovicfan4life
02-02-2009, 09:30 AM
i have been reading the thread on grips here: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=242296

is it worthwhile even looking at possibly going to a semi western at this stage for the forehand considering the other things that need to be addressed, or should i not mess with the grip and work on the things mentioned such as the non-dominant arm, rotation, knees etc?

Personally, the semi western grip was probably the best decision I've ever made in my brief experience with the game of tennis so far, so just take that for what it's worth. YMMV.

However, to say that you can't do all the things we are describing here just because you use an eastern forehand grip is just not true, so take no notice whatsoever of that advice. These concepts apply to every forehand grip, eastern to western.

aimr75
02-02-2009, 05:04 PM
Personally, the semi western grip was probably the best decision I've ever made in my brief experience with the game of tennis so far, so just take that for what it's worth. YMMV.

However, to say that you can't do all the things we are describing here just because you use an eastern forehand grip is just not true, so take no notice whatsoever of that advice. These concepts apply to every forehand grip, eastern to western.

yeah, i am concentrating foremost on getting my movement better, staying on toes and knee bend, but have started just doing some air swings with a semi western, just getting used to the feel of the grip and working on rotation and the non-dominant arm as well. i might try it the next time i go out..