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HS Tennis Player
01-28-2009, 11:02 AM
Im a 3.5 baseline player with a decent serve and good ground strokes, but i feel like the one thing that is holdin me back the most is my volleying, I dont know what it is, but they always seem to float on me, or if i do make solid contact it bounces short on their side and it gives them time to get to the volley and potentially hit a passing shot, do you have any advice for what i can do to improve my volleying?
I already hit against the wall on a semi regular basis, and when im just rallying i try to come to the net as much as possible, but it seems like no matter how much i practice it i never get better, can you help me, please?

eeytennis
01-28-2009, 11:16 AM
Im a 3.5 baseline player with a decent serve and good ground strokes, but i feel like the one thing that is holdin me back the most is my volleying, I dont know what it is, but they always seem to float on me, or if i do make solid contact it bounces short on their side and it gives them time to get to the volley and potentially hit a passing shot, do you have any advice for what i can do to improve my volleying?
I already hit against the wall on a semi regular basis, and when im just rallying i try to come to the net as much as possible, but it seems like no matter how much i practice it i never get better, can you help me, please?

Well, you want to make sure you have the correct grip which would be anywhere on or between a continental and eastern grip...and once you have that you want to make sure you punch the ball, not swing at it or bring your racket too far behind your shoulder (you might see some pro's do this, but it's because they are good at volleying and are able to adjust accordingly). Step forward into the ball with the opposite foot as the side you are volleying on and make sure your racket face isn't too open, or too much facing the sky...that would cause your volleys to pop up. Good luck!

HS Tennis Player
01-29-2009, 02:26 PM
Well, you want to make sure you have the correct grip which would be anywhere on or between a continental and eastern grip...and once you have that you want to make sure you punch the ball, not swing at it or bring your racket too far behind your shoulder (you might see some pro's do this, but it's because they are good at volleying and are able to adjust accordingly). Step forward into the ball with the opposite foot as the side you are volleying on and make sure your racket face isn't too open, or too much facing the sky...that would cause your volleys to pop up. Good luck!

Thanks a lot! Thats really helpful, especially the part about not bringin it past your shoulder, when i played today my volleys werent sailin on me too much, they would be deep, but better than bein out.

LeeD
01-29-2009, 02:32 PM
Most of us don't have time to step forwards with our feet, as the passing shot is usually hit pretty fast....
So instead of thinking moving feet, I turn shoulders first, short stroke with racketface head held chin high, shift weight forwards with your hitting arm.
Backhand, usually slightly higher racketface, but still turn sideways, and use your hitting arm with some underspin, to lead your weight shift forwards. Most players use more slice on backhand volleys, so be aware you need to really follow thru low but foreward.
Practice this against a wall, short punch stroke with full shoulder turns, underspin, and you can actually hit it pretty hard with the right body kinetics.
After first volley, if it's deep and effective, take on more step in.

10nistennis
01-29-2009, 03:04 PM
Always move into the ball. Never recoil back or jump back when you are volleying. That way, you generate more power on your volleys.

Slicendicer
01-29-2009, 05:09 PM
Im a 3.5 baseline player with a decent serve and good ground strokes, but i feel like the one thing that is holdin me back the most is my volleying, I dont know what it is, but they always seem to float on me, or if i do make solid contact it bounces short on their side and it gives them time to get to the volley and potentially hit a passing shot, do you have any advice for what i can do to improve my volleying?
I already hit against the wall on a semi regular basis, and when im just rallying i try to come to the net as much as possible, but it seems like no matter how much i practice it i never get better, can you help me, please?

Practice slice the volley with underspin and side spin. Also, practice absorbing the pace of the ball for drop volley, no forward motion.

Volley: Racket in front, firm wrist, bent knee and balanced on ball of feet, now only turn shoulders back to setup. Turn the shoulders back forward to volley. This is a great learning technique taught to me by a Wimbledon Finalist and a French Open Finalist. The idea is to keep the lower body still through the shot and torque your upper body to power the volley.

My volleys were pretty good tonight, though the first volleys I've hit in 2 years... the technique is there. So I know this works.

beckham
01-29-2009, 05:13 PM
One thing that REALLY just helped me get started was saying to myself...RACQUET OUT IN FRONT...this just helped me contact the ball at level 2-3 and well out in front. This would also make me move in and take the ball as high as possible, cutting time away from my opponent.

Kevo
01-29-2009, 07:35 PM
One of the difficult things for a lot of people is that they try to take the racquet back with their arm like a groundstroke. The way I like to teach it is to have someone throw of feed the ball and then from the ready position you can only turn your shoulders and use your legs to get the racquet behind the ball. I don't allow them to hit the ball at this point just let the ball bounce off their racquet. Many people are surprised to see the balls miraculously start landing in after just a couple of attempts.

From there you can add in forward movement and a linear "punch". After that it's mainly footwork and practice.

Kevo
01-29-2009, 07:41 PM
Most of us don't have time to step forwards with our feet, as the passing shot is usually hit pretty fast....
So instead of thinking moving feet, I turn shoulders first, short stroke with racketface head held chin high, shift weight forwards with your hitting arm.


I always try to get people on their toes and moving forward if possible. I find it's easy for people not to move if the ball comes too fast, but very hard for them to move forward when they have time if it's not stressed in practice.

One thing you said is key. The shift weight forwards part. Even if you don't have time to actually step before you make contact, if you are up on your toes and split step as the ball is struck towards you, you can get in the habit of going forwards, and the step can happen after the ball is volleyed. The important thing is the action of shifting weight forwards as the ball is struck towards you. This is why using the shoulder turn to position the racquet is critical. You only need enough of a turn to get the racquet face behind the ball and if you're leaning forward off the split step and make clean contact you can hit a killer volley if the ball has some pace to it.

W Cats
01-30-2009, 10:13 AM
I always try to get people on their toes and moving forward if possible. I find it's easy for people not to move if the ball comes too fast, but very hard for them to move forward when they have time if it's not stressed in practice.

I echo what Kevo said above. Learning forward movement is important in the skill development of a volley. Not all of your volleys will be reaction volleys especially if you play opponents at your level or a notch above.

I drill I recently picked up a drill from Greg Patton that focuses on many aspects of the volley and highlights forward movement well is to have both players at volley position on opposite sides of the net, player A feeds and easy volley, player B cushions the oncoming ball and moves forward to contact the ball a 2nd time using primarily forward movement with his footwork to propel the ball forward, to player A who repeats what B just did.
This drill is done without the ball every touching the ground.

eeytennis
02-01-2009, 05:00 AM
I echo what Kevo said above. Learning forward movement is important in the skill development of a volley. Not all of your volleys will be reaction volleys especially if you play opponents at your level or a notch above.

I drill I recently picked up a drill from Greg Patton that focuses on many aspects of the volley and highlights forward movement well is to have both players at volley position on opposite sides of the net, player A feeds and easy volley, player B cushions the oncoming ball and moves forward to contact the ball a 2nd time using primarily forward movement with his footwork to propel the ball forward, to player A who repeats what B just did.
This drill is done without the ball every touching the ground.

Yup, it is very important to move forward, especially when playing doubles. It's not necessary, but definitely something you should be able to do.

Slicendicer
02-01-2009, 05:12 AM
I echo what Kevo said above. Learning forward movement is important in the skill development of a volley. Not all of your volleys will be reaction volleys especially if you play opponents at your level or a notch above.

I drill I recently picked up a drill from Greg Patton that focuses on many aspects of the volley and highlights forward movement well is to have both players at volley position on opposite sides of the net, player A feeds and easy volley, player B cushions the oncoming ball and moves forward to contact the ball a 2nd time using primarily forward movement with his footwork to propel the ball forward, to player A who repeats what B just did.
This drill is done without the ball every touching the ground.

Move forward after the volley, not during the volley... its a progression to the net.