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kimbahpnam
01-29-2009, 08:24 AM
I can't remember what I started with, but now I play with a kind SW grip, but what's the basic grip to begin teaching others with?

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 08:27 AM
I can't remember what I started with, but now I play with a kind SW grip, but what's the basic grip to begin teaching others with?

I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys

2. Semi-Western - Forehand

3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand

4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 08:44 AM
I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys

2. Semi-Western - Forehand

3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand

4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand

Yeah, I would think that the full eastern would be perfect for teaching the one handed backhand. It starts them off with a nice, stable feeling in the wrist.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 09:10 AM
Yeah, I would think that the full eastern would be perfect for teaching the one handed backhand. It starts them off with a nice, stable feeling in the wrist.

And that is the key for me. Wrist strength and stability. That is why I dont teach the Eastern forehand.

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 09:12 AM
Very interesting comment about the eastern forehand. I never noticed that when I started out with an eastern forehand. All I know is that my forehand is much better now that I've switched to the semi western. Backhand volleys still feel very unstable with the continental though. How do you get you students to feel comfortable with that grip right off the bat?

Roddick155mph
01-29-2009, 09:53 AM
It is always the best to teach a beginner how to hold the racket with an eastern grip for serves, forehands and backhands because it allows him/her to hit flat[without spin] and flat shots and serves are easy to learn. Flat shots are easy to learn because you have to move your racket directly through the ball so a beginner can hit the ball without clipping the frame too often. without an angle whereas on a topspin shot you have to move your racket low to high almost perpendicular to the ball's trajectory so a beginner has a chance of hitting the ball with the frame of his/her racket.

SystemicAnomaly
01-29-2009, 09:54 AM
I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys
2. Semi-Western - Forehand
3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand
4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand

I follow the same general guidelines except for the FH stroke. I'll take a look at their "natural" grip and go from there -- if it is an Eastern FH or a SW grip or anything in between, I won't tinker with it at the beginning at all. If it is outside of that range, I'll nudge it over so that it does fall within that range of grips. If they don't appear to have a "natural" preference, I'll start them off with an extreme Eastern or mild SW. A bit later in their development, I'll introduce them to an actual SW grip, particularly for higher balls.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 10:05 AM
It is always the best to teach a beginner how to hold the racket with an eastern grip for serves, forehands and backhands because it allows him/her to hit flat[without spin] and flat shots and serves are easy to learn. Flat shots are easy to learn because you have to move your racket directly through the ball so a beginner can hit the ball without clipping the frame too often. without an angle whereas on a topspin shot you have to move your racket low to high almost perpendicular to the ball's trajectory so a beginner has a chance of hitting the ball with the frame of his/her racket.


Uggggg....

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 10:08 AM
Very interesting comment about the eastern forehand. I never noticed that when I started out with an eastern forehand. All I know is that my forehand is much better now that I've switched to the semi western. Backhand volleys still feel very unstable with the continental though. How do you get you students to feel comfortable with that grip right off the bat?

Let me rephrase that, "that is why I dont start out teaching the Eastern forehand grip for the forehand." If a player uses an Eastern I wouldnt say anything unless he wanted to do something different.

I do not have anything against the Eastern forehand grip for the forehand.

Ivan Morales
01-29-2009, 10:54 AM
I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys

2. Semi-Western - Forehand

3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand

4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand


It depends the age of the beginner player!!!! Obviously, a 5-years-old girl doesn't have enought force to make a volley with Continental. Every tennis digests talk about the same thing which all coaches should know: Grip progression.
As my RFET competition Tennis coach Manual says, the correct progression are:

Volleys ------ Eastern fr ----(progression) to----- Continental (both volleys)
Serve ------- Eastern fr ---- (progression) to---- Continental (1º serve)
2º serve --------------------------------------- Eastern Backhand (look at Federer...)
Forehand ---- Eastern fr ----(progression) to --- Semi-western or Western (it depends of the player and its force)
Onehanded-backhand ----- Eastern Backhand (there is no progression on here)

About the twohanded-backhand there are many option, choices and opinions. Personally, I like to teach to the little boys (and girls, of course! Even their moms...) with Eastern Forehand + Continental. When the boy hit the balls to the net because they are going hit to the floor, I use Eastern backhand + Continental (I hardly recommend this If always tha happens to the kid. Try it!). Then...the progression depends about the coach and the player's comfort when he hits. You can teach the one you like more.
Murray has eastern forehand + continental, Nadal has eastern Backhand + continental....


By the way, RFET means Real Federación Española de Tenis: Royal Spanish Tennis Federation.

All the best!
Iván.

Ivan Morales
01-29-2009, 11:02 AM
[QUOTE=Ivan Morales;3069483]Onehanded-backhand ----- Eastern Backhand (there is no progression on here)
QUOTE]

Sorry guys, I meant Western backhand. You can teach this grip even when the kids are little or If you are teaching to an adult.

wihamilton
01-29-2009, 11:12 AM
I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys

2. Semi-Western - Forehand

3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand

4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand

I would probably lean more towards an eastern for the forehand. It's easier, IMO, for beginners to find solid, clean contact. As BB mentioned, however, the SW is better for wrist strength and stability.

predrag
01-29-2009, 12:06 PM
It is always the best to teach a beginner how to hold the racket with an eastern grip for serves, forehands and backhands because it allows him/her to hit flat[without spin] and flat shots and serves are easy to learn. Flat shots are easy to learn because you have to move your racket directly through the ball so a beginner can hit the ball without clipping the frame too often. without an angle whereas on a topspin shot you have to move your racket low to high almost perpendicular to the ball's trajectory so a beginner has a chance of hitting the ball with the frame of his/her racket.

Like BB said UUUUUGGGGGGGGHHHHHH

Around here there is a little kid whose parents are spending a lot of time and money on his tennis.
Kid is very quick with excellent anticipation.
Pro who is working with him used to be REALLY good player in college.
ANyway, kid was thought eastern fh grip on his serve, and no form on his groundies.
(I heard somebody teaching: just swing whatever is natural for you)
When I asked his pro when does he plan to switch kid's grip, answer was: when he is ready.
Well, guess what, now when pro is trying to push him finally to the proper grip, kid is too stuborn to leave what feels comfortable.

Moral of the story: ALWAYS TEACH PROPER GRIPS!!!!!!!

Regards, Predrag

predrag
01-29-2009, 12:11 PM
I start beginners out with the following:

1. Continental - Serve and Volleys

2. Semi-Western - Forehand

3. Full Eastern Backhand - Onehanded backhand

4. Eastern forehand/Continental - Twohanded backhand

I assume that 4. Easter forehand is top hand.

The only difference in what I do with kids is that forehand is border line between SW and Eastern.
I believe that kids should learn proper grips early, when there is no match pressure.

Regards, Predrag

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 12:30 PM
I assume that 4. Easter forehand is top hand.

The only difference in what I do with kids is that forehand is border line between SW and Eastern.
I believe that kids should learn proper grips early, when there is no match pressure.

Regards, Predrag

Yes, eastern is tophand. Yours is fine. I put the beginners in Easterns and if they gravitate toward a SW, I dont mind. If they gravitate toward a Continental I will monitor a little closer.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 12:35 PM
(I heard somebody teaching: just swing whatever is natural for you)

We read that here as well. :)

When I asked his pro when does he plan to switch kid's grip, answer was: when he is ready.
Well, guess what, now when pro is trying to push him finally to the proper grip, kid is too stuborn to leave what feels comfortable.

Moral of the story: ALWAYS TEACH PROPER GRIPS!!!!!!!

Regards, Predrag

Actually, "when he is ready" actually means "I dont care because chances are I won't be teaching this kid when it matters. Let the other pro worry about it."

:)

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 12:46 PM
Like BB said UUUUUGGGGGGGGHHHHHH

Around here there is a little kid whose parents are spending a lot of time and money on his tennis.
Kid is very quick with excellent anticipation.
Pro who is working with him used to be REALLY good player in college.
ANyway, kid was thought eastern fh grip on his serve, and no form on his groundies.
(I heard somebody teaching: just swing whatever is natural for you)
When I asked his pro when does he plan to switch kid's grip, answer was: when he is ready.
Well, guess what, now when pro is trying to push him finally to the proper grip, kid is too stuborn to leave what feels comfortable.

Moral of the story: ALWAYS TEACH PROPER GRIPS!!!!!!!

Regards, Predrag

Seriously, some people really underestimate the power of muscle memory. I used to think that I served with a continental until I found that my grip was sort of sliding to an eastern forehand during my back-swing. Not good.

Here I am about 6 months later, finally starting to hit my serves as well as I did back then. Had I learned the proper way from the get go I could probably be serving some serious heat by now, but instead I've had to pretty much rebuild my serve completely from scratch.

Moral of the story: Do not "do what is natural", for you, at all costs. We are all different, which means that we all have our own screwed up ideas of what is "natural". You don't see the pros doing what was natural to them when they first picked up a racquet. They'd be robots if that was true.

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 12:51 PM
Let me rephrase that, "that is why I dont start out teaching the Eastern forehand grip for the forehand." If a player uses an Eastern I wouldnt say anything unless he wanted to do something different.

I do not have anything against the Eastern forehand grip for the forehand.

I was actually asking why the eastern forehand offers less stability in the wrist, since I never noticed that in my eastern forehand days.

Like I said before, how do you get your students comfortable with the continental grip for volleying? I'm an OK volleyer, but the continental just feels wrong on the backhand side. Perhaps I'm not hitting out in front of my body enough? I have a video of my volleys though and a seem to catch the ball at around 6 inches in front of my body. I thought that was far out enough.

CoachingMastery
01-29-2009, 12:56 PM
If a player (child) is not "strong" enough to hit volleys or serves with a continental grip, then chances are, the child is NOT being taught correctly in how to hit with this grip.

Strength is not an issue when players hit correctly. (I hold the racquet with one finger and thumb to demonstrate crisp backhand and forehand volleys have nothing to do with strength.)

When players are taught to use mechanics associated with eastern grips, then yes, the continental grip fails and the player feels like they need strength.

My now ten year old daughter could volley with a continental grip when she was 8,...when she first was taught to play tennis. In addition, I've trained hundreds of junior players (as well has hundreds of beginning adults) to use the continental grip on volleys and serves, with almost no exceptions.

Those kids and adults who are either self taught or actually taught by a pro or book or video to use eastern grips tend to stagnate at lower levels on these shots and fail to progress to more effective volleys and serves (as well as fail to be able to DEFEND more effective shots by better players), and then develop a fear for the net, a fear of hitting second serves, and end up staying at lower levels because of these weaknesses.

From 35 years of teaching, and having taught thousands of players, it is without question that players who are left to their own feeling of "what feels natural" seldom develop skilled tennis strokes and methods. Like playing other sports or skilled activities (musical instruments, etc), advanced foundations seldom are natural or come naturally. They usually involve dedicated practice or conscious, competent strokes, grips and footwork...until those patterns BECOME unconsciously successful.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 01:18 PM
If a player (child) is not "strong" enough to hit volleys or serves with a continental grip, then chances are, the child is NOT being taught correctly in how to hit with this grip.

Strength is not an issue when players hit correctly. (I hold the racquet with one finger and thumb to demonstrate crisp backhand and forehand volleys have nothing to do with strength.)

When players are taught to use mechanics associated with eastern grips, then yes, the continental grip fails and the player feels like they need strength.

My now ten year old daughter could volley with a continental grip when she was 8,...when she first was taught to play tennis. In addition, I've trained hundreds of junior players (as well has hundreds of beginning adults) to use the continental grip on volleys and serves, with almost no exceptions.

Those kids and adults who are either self taught or actually taught by a pro or book or video to use eastern grips tend to stagnate at lower levels on these shots and fail to progress to more effective volleys and serves (as well as fail to be able to DEFEND more effective shots by better players), and then develop a fear for the net, a fear of hitting second serves, and end up staying at lower levels because of these weaknesses.

From 35 years of teaching, and having taught thousands of players, it is without question that players who are left to their own feeling of "what feels natural" seldom develop skilled tennis strokes and methods. Like playing other sports or skilled activities (musical instruments, etc), advanced foundations seldom are natural or come naturally. They usually involve dedicated practice or conscious, competent strokes, grips and footwork...until those patterns BECOME unconsciously successful.

Great answer.

junbumkim
01-29-2009, 01:29 PM
Uggggg....

I struggled a lot to learn how to serve with continental grip initially. I did have a correct grip, but I just kept framing, framing, and framing.

It might have been a little different if the coach was able to compartmentalize parts of serves.

However, when another coach recommended that I try Eastern Forehand grip, it was a lot more natural and was able to make clean contacts with the ball. I gradually switched to continental, and now serve with continetal on all serves.

If a player cannot use continetal grip initially and continues to struggle, he needs to build confidence that he can make a clean contact with the ball. In that case, the player might have to start with eastern forehand grip to get that confidence and eventually switch to a continental.

Everyone is different like everyone would agree. Although there is a "proper way" of doing something, some people might have to take a detour to get on the proper way.

Bungalo Bill
01-29-2009, 02:35 PM
I struggled a lot to learn how to serve with continental grip initially. I did have a correct grip, but I just kept framing, framing, and framing.

It might have been a little different if the coach was able to compartmentalize parts of serves.

That was what TennisMastery said. A coach needs to have tools, analogies, etc...to make it happen. The serve is a complicated motion and it is very easy for us to just try and get success right away and not allow the player to struggle with it. It is how we learn.

When doing tough physical drills we are essentially doing the same. We are allowing the brain and body to struggle through the drill to get stronger and more coordinated. We are in essence training the nervous system.

However, when another coach recommended that I try Eastern Forehand grip, it was a lot more natural and was able to make clean contacts with the ball. I gradually switched to continental, and now serve with continetal on all serves.

If a player cannot use continetal grip initially and continues to struggle, he needs to build confidence that he can make a clean contact with the ball. In that case, the player might have to start with eastern forehand grip to get that confidence and eventually switch to a continental.

Yeah, I am not in agreement. It is not hard to teach people the continental. A coach needs to simply break it down if they have too. If my daughter can learn, so can you.

SystemicAnomaly
01-29-2009, 04:54 PM
For the service grip, I'll initially ask the student to use a continental grip, never an Eastern FH. Some beginners & low intermediates will balk at this grip or get frustrated trying to use it. I then suggest a compromise -- a semi-conti grip. Most are happy with this "compromise" and will often get accustomed to it in short order. Most will be able to shift to a full continental in a relatively short time after than.

LeeD
01-29-2009, 05:08 PM
Yes, semi cont, similar to BorisBeckers first serve grip.

junbumkim
01-29-2009, 07:19 PM
That was what TennisMastery said. A coach needs to have tools, analogies, etc...to make it happen. The serve is a complicated motion and it is very easy for us to just try and get success right away and not allow the player to struggle with it. It is how we learn.

When doing tough physical drills we are essentially doing the same. We are allowing the brain and body to struggle through the drill to get stronger and more coordinated. We are in essence training the nervous system.



Yeah, I am not in agreement. It is not hard to teach people the continental. A coach needs to simply break it down if they have too. If my daughter can learn, so can you.

I don't really doubt that everyone can use continental. Some people will pick it up much faster than others. And some people might have to take a different route to get there.

Initially, I just couldn't hit a serve with the continental grip, and framed every single ball. Then, I used eastern forehand grip, and it was much easier to make a clean contact. I gradually switched to a continental grip.

In the end of Sonic Serve, Nick B says that it's also important for beginners to be able to make a clean contact with the ball, and some of them may have to start with eastern forehand grip to do that. Then, they can make a gradual switch to continental.

As a person who struggled a lot with the game, it kinda made sense to me. Once I could make the contact with the ball, it was easier to concentrate on other things, and make a gradual change. Of course, the change would have been really difficult if it was too ingrained.

Djokovicfan4life
01-29-2009, 08:30 PM
I struggled a lot to learn how to serve with continental grip initially. I did have a correct grip, but I just kept framing, framing, and framing.

It might have been a little different if the coach was able to compartmentalize parts of serves.

However, when another coach recommended that I try Eastern Forehand grip, it was a lot more natural and was able to make clean contacts with the ball. I gradually switched to continental, and now serve with continetal on all serves.

If a player cannot use continetal grip initially and continues to struggle, he needs to build confidence that he can make a clean contact with the ball. In that case, the player might have to start with eastern forehand grip to get that confidence and eventually switch to a continental.

Everyone is different like everyone would agree. Although there is a "proper way" of doing something, some people might have to take a detour to get on the proper way.

Totally disagree. Build up confidence, you say? How? By creating a false sense of satisfaction that will inevitably be shattered to bits once they begin to realize that serving with an eastern forehand grip is a crutch, and nothing more?

junbumkim
01-29-2009, 09:45 PM
Totally disagree. Build up confidence, you say? How? By creating a false sense of satisfaction that will inevitably be shattered to bits once they begin to realize that serving with an eastern forehand grip is a crutch, and nothing more?

Well, a BEGINNER initially keeps framing the ball with a continental grip, but s/he can make a clean contact with the eastern forehand grip on the serve.

S/he maybe better off starting with the eastern forehand grip, then gradually switch to continetal grip. As someone said above, first to semi-continental, then to the continental. If s/he's forced to stick with the continental, then
frustration is going to take over and practice will be less effective. However, if s/he starts with the eastern, then s/he is at least getting some positive feedback and will be able to concentrate rather than getting frustrated.

At least, that's how it worked for me.

And don't say s/he doesn't deserve to play or should be more patient because you know you can't concentrate if you are really frustrated.

Don't take my words out of context and put them into extremes. I never said a player should stick with an eastern fh grip on serves. I simply said some player may have to start with an eastern fh grip to get to a continental grip.

predrag
01-30-2009, 06:20 AM
Well, a BEGINNER initially keeps framing the ball with a continental grip, but s/he can make a clean contact with the eastern forehand grip on the serve.

S/he maybe better off starting with the eastern forehand grip, then gradually switch to continetal grip. As someone said above, first to semi-continental, then to the continental. If s/he's forced to stick with the continental, then
frustration is going to take over and practice will be less effective. However, if s/he starts with the eastern, then s/he is at least getting some positive feedback and will be able to concentrate rather than getting frustrated.

At least, that's how it worked for me.

And don't say s/he doesn't deserve to play or should be more patient because you know you can't concentrate if you are really frustrated.

Don't take my words out of context and put them into extremes. I never said a player should stick with an eastern fh grip on serves. I simply said some player may have to start with an eastern fh grip to get to a continental grip.



I have 7 year old girls serving with continental grip.
If 7 y.o. child has patience and strength to learn it, all above mentioned arguments seem pale.

Regards, Predrag

Djokovicfan4life
01-30-2009, 10:54 AM
Well, a BEGINNER initially keeps framing the ball with a continental grip, but s/he can make a clean contact with the eastern forehand grip on the serve.

S/he maybe better off starting with the eastern forehand grip, then gradually switch to continetal grip. As someone said above, first to semi-continental, then to the continental. If s/he's forced to stick with the continental, then
frustration is going to take over and practice will be less effective. However, if s/he starts with the eastern, then s/he is at least getting some positive feedback and will be able to concentrate rather than getting frustrated.

At least, that's how it worked for me.

And don't say s/he doesn't deserve to play or should be more patient because you know you can't concentrate if you are really frustrated.

Don't take my words out of context and put them into extremes. I never said a player should stick with an eastern fh grip on serves. I simply said some player may have to start with an eastern fh grip to get to a continental grip.

Hello pot, I'm kettle, have we met before? I never said that you did recommend that players stick with the eastern forehand grip. What I did say is that muscle memory is not something that should be ****ed with, believe me. You can't just gradually ease into serving with the continental grip by serving for awhile with this semi continental that you speak of. The eastern forehand serve obviously requires no pronation, so just how exactly are you supposed to learn to pronate out of nowhere after creating incorrect muscle memory?

Bungalo Bill
01-30-2009, 11:54 AM
I don't really doubt that everyone can use continental. Some people will pick it up much faster than others. And some people might have to take a different route to get there.

Taking a different route is certainly your call. However, it isnt mine.

Initially, I just couldn't hit a serve with the continental grip, and framed every single ball. Then, I used eastern forehand grip, and it was much easier to make a clean contact. I gradually switched to a continental grip.

Usually that is how everyone starts. A pro like TennisMastery knows how to help the player shape their swing to overcome that false obstacle.

In the end of Sonic Serve, Nick B says that it's also important for beginners to be able to make a clean contact with the ball, and some of them may have to start with eastern forehand grip to do that. Then, they can make a gradual switch to continental.

Yup, you are right. However, it doesnt mean we havent advanced or that other coaches have the capability to overcome a lot of past perceptions.

As a person who struggled a lot with the game, it kinda made sense to me. Once I could make the contact with the ball, it was easier to concentrate on other things, and make a gradual change. Of course, the change would have been really difficult if it was too ingrained.

Yes, and there in lies the problem. Getting it too engrained. Just as you said, that some people may need a different way, a lot of people who learn the Easter forehand grip dont make any further attempt to change the grip until it is engrained.

Perhaps, that is why I simply choose to avoid it. Besides it being harder on our arm/shoulder.

Junbumkin, I perhaps need to back off and not imply that you are wrong. I simply have my preference as you have yours. I think as long as we realize that the person who wields the serve using an Eastern forehand grip will need to make a continous effort to move it towards continental, I think we can meet half way on our diffeences in this area.

What do you say?

CoachingMastery
01-30-2009, 12:44 PM
As I've said before: when you learn to serve using a different grip, (even something somewhere between cont and EF), you develop a different swing path, as Bill mentioned too, in an earlier note.

It is not JUST a grip change!

This is why it is SO VERY HARD for players who established an eastern forehand grip to change. Not only do you have to get used to a different grip in your hand, (a very 'intimate' change that is easily felt as uncomfortable), but you also have to adjust your body position, swing path, rotation, and usually contact point (relative to your body) when changing from EF to C.

Also, even the thought of thinking that you give them a slight adjustment towards the EF will usually promote the EF style of swing.

Yes, I've had two players out of 3500 who simply could not get the cont.

That does not mean we gave up on them: ironically, the training with the cont. helped them develop a reasonable serve with the EF that had spin and not be a "gravity reliant" server. (someone who hits hard enough to clear the net...but soft enough that gravity brings the ball into the court.)

If you have truly taught the student well, using the proper tools, sequence, drills, exercises...and the student has done his "homework"...then I don't even think that there would be the exception I mentioned earlier about the two who didn't progress as desired with the cont. grip.

But, hey, I know how easy it is to 'let them" believe they are being successful in serving using the eastern forehand grip. Lazy coaches tend to favor this because it lets them off the hook for not knowing how to help their students achieve this part of the game.

I guess they would be like the piano teacher or the typing teacher that gives up on students who say, "typing or playing the piano is hard...its easier with my two index fingers" and lets them "hunt and peck" for the rest of their life.

Something to think about anyway!

junbumkim
01-30-2009, 03:46 PM
Taking a different route is certainly your call. However, it isnt mine.



Usually that is how everyone starts. A pro like TennisMastery knows how to help the player shape their swing to overcome that false obstacle.



Yup, you are right. However, it doesnt mean we havent advanced or that other coaches have the capability to overcome a lot of past perceptions.



Yes, and there in lies the problem. Getting it too engrained. Just as you said, that some people may need a different way, a lot of people who learn the Easter forehand grip dont make any further attempt to change the grip until it is engrained.

Perhaps, that is why I simply choose to avoid it. Besides it being harder on our arm/shoulder.

Junbumkin, I perhaps need to back off and not imply that you are wrong. I simply have my preference as you have yours. I think as long as we realize that the person who wields the serve using an Eastern forehand grip will need to make a continous effort to move it towards continental, I think we can meet half way on our diffeences in this area.

What do you say?

Yeah, I agree. As you pointed out, I agree that the grip change should be made before it's too ingrained and the player must acknowledge that s/he will have to change the grip to continental.

Mostly, I just wanted to voice my opinion as a player to whom several aspects of the game didn't come quite easily. I feel like a lot of coaches are pretty athletic and the game came to them quite naturally, so they sometimes don't have the patience or capability to be flexible or methods to develop a player's techinque and game.

zapvor
01-31-2009, 12:33 PM
now i suck, but whenever i happen to help someone out with a stroke i let them use whatever grip they are comfortable with. i think other components are more important. besides you can hit with different grips, so thats not a big issue.

for serve i would do continental though.

WildVolley
01-31-2009, 01:06 PM
I start beginners with grips similar to what has already been mentioned.

1) FH - either SW or extreme eastern.
2) BH: 1hbh - eastern bh; 2hbh - continental (SW off hand)
3) Serve, volley, overhead - continental.

I find that the SW forehand works well for most beginners and allows them to start hitting topspin right away.

halalula1234
01-31-2009, 04:43 PM
what ever they start holding a racket up with and hitting shots with is the grip that is mostly likely to be their most confortable. They should start with the grip they feel good with and conti for serve and volleys. But a lot of them starts with eastern for serve adn volleys first then alter it to conti a little by little. For the Bh if 1 handed i think eastern is easiest and 2 handed is just normal eastern/conti combo.