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backhandbaby
01-30-2009, 12:54 PM
Hi
I am playing in a 7.0 mixed dbls usta league in So Cali. I've been playing league for 2 years but never with a man. WHAT drives a man crazy about women partners? We've won our first 2 matches in straight sets. So, what should I do as a woman to be a great partner?

BiGGieStuFF
01-30-2009, 01:00 PM
Just get the ball back in play crosscourt. As a guy who has played 7.0 mixed I know the ball is going to the woman 90% of the time. It's up to the guy to be aggressive enough to poach the shots coming back. Be aggressive up at net and don't poach on the guy's forehand. Unless you got a clean overhead let it go. more times than not your male partners groundstroke will be a better shot than a female's falling back overhead. Let them know you're letting it go.

backhandbaby
01-30-2009, 01:06 PM
That makes perfect sense. Thanks so much. I'm a lefty who plays on the deuce side (coach says I should) BUT my backhand is a much better shot. Im debating if I should play the ad side so our best shots are to the middle. any thoughts?

BiGGieStuFF
01-30-2009, 01:35 PM
In doubles most of the serves should go down the middle so if you're a lefty and your backhand is better you may very well see more shots to your backhand from the deuce side. Serving out wide gives the returner a better angle to get away from the net person. You should learn how to play both sides though in case you come up against a team where you know they have problems serving to certain sides. You can adjust to that.

backhandbaby
01-30-2009, 03:43 PM
wow awesome advice..... Im playing in an hour!

JesseT
02-03-2009, 09:52 PM
may I add...move

Nothing pleases me more than a mixed partner who can move after I've poached/crossed.

Tennisman912
02-03-2009, 11:23 PM
I would want you on the deuce side of the court, even though you are a lefty (as am I). If the skill levels of the players are far apart, you are almost always better off having the better player playing the ad side IMHO.

Other than that, the most important attribute you can have is being consistent. If you can handle all shots within your ability without missing the easy ones, you will be a valued partner. That is the most important thing to me. Give me a consistent partner, no matter their rating and we will do very well.

Good luck

TM

Nellie
02-04-2009, 07:30 AM
don't hit the ball high. I really don't care if the ither side makes a good point - I just don't want to spend the match getting pelted with overheads!

saram
02-13-2009, 09:33 AM
I enjoy playing with confident female players. The only thing that irritates me playing mixed is that if the female player has played with men in the past that get on the female for making mistakes.

No player should ever say "sorry" to their partner--regardless of gender. We are all trying on the court to do our best.

Even if the woman is missing all of her shots--I'm happy she is going for them and even happier if she will smile after the miss and give me a high-five and get pumped up for the next point.

It seems to me that in mixed--women put more pressure on themselves and say "sorry" more often than they do when paired with another female on court.

Go for your shots, stay positive, and enjoy the game for which it is...

raiden031
02-13-2009, 01:28 PM
I get frustrated by my partners' serves in mixed. The returner always seems to do whatever they want with the return, making it difficult to poach. I'd like to start seeing some topin/kick serves instead of the dinkers I see so much in mixed.

crystal_clear
02-13-2009, 01:40 PM
I would want you on the deuce side of the court, even though you are a lefty (as am I). If the skill levels of the players are far apart, you are almost always better off having the better player playing the ad side IMHO.

Other than that, the most important attribute you can have is being consistent. If you can handle all shots within your ability without missing the easy ones, you will be a valued partner. That is the most important thing to me. Give me a consistent partner, no matter their rating and we will do very well.

Good luck

TM
What is IMHO?

crystal_clear
02-13-2009, 01:42 PM
No player should ever say "sorry" to their partner--regardless of gender. We are all trying on the court to do our best.

Even if the woman is missing all of her shots--I'm happy she is going for them and even happier if she will smile after the miss and give me a high-five and get pumped up for the next point.

It seems to me that in mixed--women put more pressure on themselves and say "sorry" more often than they do when paired with another female on court.

Go for your shots, stay positive, and enjoy the game for which it is...
Thank you so much~

crystal_clear
02-13-2009, 01:43 PM
don't hit the ball high. I really don't care if the ither side makes a good point - I just don't want to spend the match getting pelted with overheads!

Got to remember this for sure~

shell
02-14-2009, 08:08 AM
I get frustrated by my partners' serves in mixed. The returner always seems to do whatever they want with the return, making it difficult to poach. I'd like to start seeing some topin/kick serves instead of the dinkers I see so much in mixed.

Raiden, what level are the women you are playing with? It would be very rare to see a kicker, or even some degree of topspin serve until 4.0, but probably more upper 4 to 4.5 in my experience. I think it would be better to talk with your partner about placement ie. serve to the backhand. You might get a better feel for the return then for poaching.

hotseat
02-14-2009, 09:51 PM
basic use of signals does magic in mixed doubles at that level. make some easy to use signals and share them with your partner so it doesn't even matter where you hit the ball. this way you won't have to stress about hitting such an amazing serve all the time. if your partner signals poach, serve and get moving to the other side! just seeing the two of you moving so much right away will make the returner nervous. after a couple of successful poaches start mixing in fake poaches and watch the free points rack up as your nervous opponent dumps the ball in the net ;)

raiden031
02-15-2009, 03:08 AM
Raiden, what level are the women you are playing with? It would be very rare to see a kicker, or even some degree of topspin serve until 4.0, but probably more upper 4 to 4.5 in my experience. I think it would be better to talk with your partner about placement ie. serve to the backhand. You might get a better feel for the return then for poaching.

I'm always playing with different levels. The toughest thing when playing with a 3.0 up to 4.5 is my partner holding serve. Even the 4.5s I've played with had flat second serves, they could place them better, but still lacked pace. Another issue is that I don't play with any of these partners often, so there isn't much time to develop a team strategy and get to know each others game. I can improvise a strategy when playing men's tennis, but in mixed it just doesn't work for me because I always have to overcompensate for my partner.

hotseat
02-15-2009, 02:18 PM
I'm always playing with different levels. The toughest thing when playing with a 3.0 up to 4.5 is my partner holding serve. Even the 4.5s I've played with had flat second serves, they could place them better, but still lacked pace. Another issue is that I don't play with any of these partners often, so there isn't much time to develop a team strategy and get to know each others game. I can improvise a strategy when playing men's tennis, but in mixed it just doesn't work for me because I always have to overcompensate for my partner.

rather than having the attitude that you have to overcompensate, try having the same attitude you say that you carry during men's tennis. that is, if something's not working, try something else! if you feel your partner is weak at the net, try having both of you stay back and baseline bash/lob fest. there's no shame in doing that, just ask the Bryan brothers ;) if you feel your partner is getting singled out to a blatant degree, try doing things like adding signals (see my previous post) to force some of the action on you. when you serve, try having your partner hug the baseline with you, or maybe try australian format. any of these things give you a better chance of getting involved with the point. orchestrate movement so you guys move together. also, you have to look at your partner as just that - a partner. if you go into the match looking at your partner as an inferior player you're already behind in the match before the first point is played out.

raiden031
02-15-2009, 05:08 PM
rather than having the attitude that you have to overcompensate, try having the same attitude you say that you carry during men's tennis. that is, if something's not working, try something else! if you feel your partner is weak at the net, try having both of you stay back and baseline bash/lob fest. there's no shame in doing that, just ask the Bryan brothers ;) if you feel your partner is getting singled out to a blatant degree, try doing things like adding signals (see my previous post) to force some of the action on you. when you serve, try having your partner hug the baseline with you, or maybe try australian format. any of these things give you a better chance of getting involved with the point. orchestrate movement so you guys move together. also, you have to look at your partner as just that - a partner. if you go into the match looking at your partner as an inferior player you're already behind in the match before the first point is played out.

The difference in men's tennis is that the playing field is level. I can count on decent serves and I can count on my partner to hit strong shots that allow me to play more offensive at the net. When someone hits a slow ball barely passed the service line most of the time, I have to play more defensively because the opponent has more options on what to do with the ball. See where I'm gettin at.

As for your recommendations, the prob is I play too much lower-level tennis where nobody does the things you are describing. I have never faced a team that could actually play the Australian formation effectively. Same goes with teams playing signals. I tried signals in 6.0 mixed (we made it to Nationals) and my partner never covered my alley because she wasn't quick enough to get there. When my partner is being targeted with every single shot, it doesn't matter if they are at the net or baseline, because they will eventually lose the rally. So I either sit there and watch, or I overcompensate and end up hitting more errors anyways. Thats how mixed has always been for me.

I've wanted to play some higher-level mixed, but its impossible because the higher level players refuse to partner with anyone whom they don't know and trust, and its just hard in general to find players to practice and play with as your rating gets higher and players become more clique-ish.

crystal_clear
02-15-2009, 06:08 PM
Hi
I am playing in a 7.0 mixed dbls usta league in So Cali. I've been playing league for 2 years but never with a man. WHAT drives a man crazy about women partners? We've won our first 2 matches in straight sets. So, what should I do as a woman to be a great partner?

Does anyone know how a 7.0 mixed double was rated?

crystal_clear
02-15-2009, 06:32 PM
If my male partner moves slowly, I have to play baseline in the match. Any suggestions on what to do if partners don't move?

saram
02-16-2009, 01:38 PM
I'm always playing with different levels. The toughest thing when playing with a 3.0 up to 4.5 is my partner holding serve.

You know--the key to holding serve in doubles it getting the first one in and a good partner at net.

saram
02-16-2009, 01:39 PM
Does anyone know how a 7.0 mixed double was rated?

7.0= two 3.5's or a 4.0 and 3.0 combination.