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View Full Version : Nailing down the T again and again


Hardserve
01-30-2009, 05:54 PM
One of the most frustrating problems in tennis I've ever come up against.

There's nothing more frustrating (second to a double fault), than a
well placed serve that heads down the middle t to the backhand
and lands deep in the T, but then suddenly the ball veers off to
the left heading straight back again into the receiver's hands
and the receiver dosen't have to move because the ball is
coming straight at him.

This criss-cross bounce issue keeps coming up every now and
again when wanting to aim straight down the T.

How do we stop this problem?

oneguy21
01-30-2009, 06:15 PM
Hit flat.

10 char

Hardserve
01-30-2009, 06:22 PM
I am hitting with Continental. It hits flat when I pronate and looks like a flat serve, But for some reason every now and again I'm getting a little bit of slice coming off the bounce after it hits off
the T and that ruins the serve I want to do.

It ends up going 5-10 degrees off course every now and again. That is costly.

lawlaw
01-30-2009, 06:37 PM
I would have to assume you are throwing the ball very slightly to your left thus making a truly flat serve up the middle near impossible.

oneguy21
01-30-2009, 06:38 PM
Regardless of how flat you hit, you're still hitting with some spin. To hit flatter try to make the racquet head parallel to the baseline, and hit through the ball and make sure to pronate.

However if you look at serves in slow mo, it's actually evident that no matter what kind of serve you're hitting, the racquet head is always parallel to the baseline at contact. It's the direction the racquet swings after contact that decides the type of spin imparted on the ball.

So a simple solution to your problem is hitting flatter serves.

Another solution is to hit a twist serve. The American twist serve is a special type of topspin-slice, that causes the ball to curve to the left and kick to the right. A deadly solution to your problem is it not?

On a twist serve, the slice on the ball causes it to curve to the left b/c of the magnus effect, but the topspin is in a sense included in the slice. And thus, the topspin which is in the direction of the slice spin will inevitably cause the ball to kick to the right.

Assuming you're a righty.

J011yroger
01-31-2009, 06:07 AM
Video would be a tremendous help if you could manage it. At least then we wouldn't have to guess at what you are doing.

Also if you take the video straight from behind it is best. If you watch my ace reel video, I took it from off to the side, and it not as easy to see the side to side action on the ball.

J

JavierLW
01-31-2009, 06:24 AM
One of the most frustrating problems in tennis I've ever come up against.

There's nothing more frustrating (second to a double fault), than a
well placed serve that heads down the middle t to the backhand
and lands deep in the T, but then suddenly the ball veers off to
the left heading straight back again into the receiver's hands
and the receiver dosen't have to move because the ball is
coming straight at him.

This criss-cross bounce issue keeps coming up every now and
again when wanting to aim straight down the T.

How do we stop this problem?

The only real good solution is to get a basket of tennis balls, go out and practice, practice, practice.....

And dont think too much about where it's going (it's not like we can MAKE ourselves turn the racquet face in that small of an increment), just visualize your goal and try to feel what's happening.

Obviously you're probably not fully pronating all the time so your racquet face is still slightly closed on contact (like it would be if you wanted to slice the ball). I do that all the time in my league (on purpose because the adults I play seem to never change their return position and I can jam them with that serve, where the juniors stand further back and further to the left).

The reason for practicing it to death is then you will build up more muscle memory on how you want to do it, otherwise sometimes a bad habit from your "other motion" with the other grip could creep in, or you could pick up another bad habit without knowing it.

Either that or figure out how the heck you are doing that serve and try to jam their backhand, although that sometimes requires the ability to aim the ball well.

LeeD
01-31-2009, 07:21 AM
As OneGuy said, you might employ the Twist for those situations.....
Also, be happy you have some slice in your first serve. What runs TOWARDS you opponent on one side of his service court means it runs AWAY from your opponent on the other side !
Now he has to respect that touch of slice you impart on your first serves, and has to stand over farther, making your T serve that much more effective.
Kinda like, you got half a glass of water. Does than mean you only have half a glass or does it mean you have lots of water, a full half a glass?

zapvor
01-31-2009, 12:43 PM
good posts above. someone should do a thread on how to hit a twist/kick serve

LeeD
02-01-2009, 03:51 PM
American twist...
Line up as usual, feet and body wise. Same continental grip.
Your toss is now behind your head, so it drops towards the alley of the sideline you are serving from.
Your stroke brush's upwards and forewards. You hitting zone is lower than on flat serves, so you can stroke upwards as well as above.
The ball clears the net by a good margin, faster twists need less margin over the net, slower twists need lotsa margin to achieve a really high bounce out wide or away from the opponent.