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racquetstudio
01-31-2009, 09:33 AM
Im a 45 year old 5.0,i just started hitting again after a five year layoff.Although im twenty pounds heavier i can still hit every shot in the book.Return of serve is my problem,i am having a tough time reading the ball.I feel like a fish out of water when it comes to the return,any tips.Thanks, RCM

LeeD
01-31-2009, 09:51 AM
Since you got all the shots, I'd suggest continental volley grip, stand at the baseline, move in and volley it low and either side of the middle.
Normal groundies are hard to return serve against fast moving balls.
If the server tends to stay back, then volley higher, making your ball go deeper.

Djokovicfan4life
01-31-2009, 11:31 AM
Since you got all the shots, I'd suggest continental volley grip, stand at the baseline, move in and volley it low and either side of the middle.
Normal groundies are hard to return serve against fast moving balls.
If the server tends to stay back, then volley higher, making your ball go deeper.

I guess this is your way of saying that he should work on his block return of serve? I agree if that's what you're referring to, but to put it the way you did is very strange indeed.

Jackie T. Stephens
01-31-2009, 11:34 AM
Since your an older gent, i think you should work on chipp and charge, younger players like me these days are all about power from the baseline.

fuzz nation
01-31-2009, 07:52 PM
The block return can be a lot like a volley - carry forward momentum into your split step so you can put some punch on the ball without having to crank up a swing. I think that the return has its own tempo and I have more trouble with these shots than any others. If you have a hitting partner, etc. who can feed you some balls, get them to serve a bucket (or three) to you from up at the service line. I have a substantially better return when I get to hit a bunch of these feeds every now and then.

LeeD
02-01-2009, 04:29 PM
Well, obviously, a short backswing to handle the faster moving ball with normal groundie technique is the leading option.
I'm old school, so a volley stroke return is the easiest for me. If I can volley your 90 mph passing shot, I should be able to volley your 130 serve from 15' farther back.
Chip return of serve is the same stroke as volley.

Djokovicfan4life
02-01-2009, 04:51 PM
Well, obviously, a short backswing to handle the faster moving ball with normal groundie technique is the leading option.
I'm old school, so a volley stroke return is the easiest for me. If I can volley your 90 mph passing shot, I should be able to volley your 130 serve from 15' farther back.
Chip return of serve is the same stroke as volley.

I agree, I just thought it was a tad misleading to refer to the return of serve as a "volley".

Bagumbawalla
02-01-2009, 06:56 PM
First of all, if you have been off for 5 years, you need to practice.

Find someone with a consistant serve, who can place the ball well, and is willing to hit you a ton of serves.

To start off, have him/her hit to the forehand for a while, then to the backhand- so you can groove the return without having to wory about the direction.

Unconsciously, much will come back to you. You will begin to pick up on "cues" that will help you read your opponent.

The main thing is to watch the ball as it leaves the opponet's racket. You will (also) notice the followthrough the racket takes (even if only unconsciously) so you can begin to shift your weight and turn to the ball.

Then, when you feel good about your return stroke-- with the partner hitting at a slow to meduim pace, have him/her move the ball randomly forehand to backhand. Imagine you are in a match- and return the ball crosscourt or down the line-- don't just hit them back anywhere.

Eventually it will all come back to you, then you can have your partner begin hitting a bit harder. If he/she cannot hit hard enough to suit you, have him/her take one giant step into the court and serve from there.

Obviously, there are powerful first serves that nobody can return with a full swing- so, you will eventually want to also practice shortening your swing and even "punching" or "blocking" the serve back- but I would save this for after you have mastered control over the normal serve.