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tin
02-02-2009, 01:29 AM
i'm planning to start playing tennis after graduation in university, that's this march. im 19,female. i haven't played tennis at all. i need all the information i can have regarding starting playing tennis for beginners -----from trainors, trainor fees, racquets, apparel.....and anything you all think i need to know.. thanks...=)

LeeD
02-02-2009, 09:35 AM
Basically, buy a semi cheap racket or borrow, go to the courts, and start hitting against the wall.
For correct form, watch some tennis on TV and try to copy.
Phillipines is hot, so shorts or running gear at first, with good tennis shoes.
You'll run into other players immediately who will help out with your game.

10s talk
02-02-2009, 09:55 AM
there are a lot of good free YouTube videos

and a wall is a good place to start, let the ball bounce twice for better timing if you need to

Djokovicfan4life
02-02-2009, 10:01 AM
Step 1: DO NOT START OFF WITH A WALMART RACQUET! Just look for a frame that suits your game instead. Since you are a beginner at this time you won't need to worry about back up racquets at this moment in time, or string changes every few weeks or so, so don't even look at the price when it comes to choosing a frame. It's much more important to get one that will help you play your best tennis. When I first started to take tennis seriously, I had a very girly game, so to spead. And I don't mean that as an insult, by the way. I just mean that I started out with many similarities to a typical female player's game, such as an eastern forehand grip, two handed backhand, etc.

Step 2: Find some sort of valuable instruction that suits your needs. Personally, I use www.virtultennisacademy.com, along with this site, as my main source of information about everything tennis-related. The important thing is to find something that works for you. If you choose to go the internet self taught route, such as I have, your ability to analyze your own game and spot your areas of weakness will be an absolute must. Video analysis is the key here. Many times there is a MASSIVE difference between what a player thinks they are doing and what they are really doing in reality. You'd be amazed at how often a coach will tell a player to do a certain thing, only to hear from the student that they are doing what he's telling them the entire time, hahahahaha!

Video analysis fixes all of this. It provides indisputable evidence for coaches and player's alike, because video doesn't lie. Personally, I am fascinated by in-depth discussions on technique, mentality, work ethic, etc., so I believe that I can learn to play tennis at a very high level, as long as I retain my willingness to put in the hard yards and track my progress through the use of a video camera. It's very important to access your goals as a tennis player before deciding how to go about the business of actually practicing though. Your goals may be to simply have some fun with friends batting the ball around for a few hours and then calling it a day, and there's nothing wrong with that. The fact that you asked about coaching fees suggests that you are looking to become a great player though, and I think that's absolutely fantastic! :) YMMV.

Also, never underestimate the importance of a good serve. If you develop a killer serve you will always be starting the points out on YOUR terms rather than a neutral or perhaps even defensive position, depending on how weak the serve is. Most players don't practice their serve, at all. Don't make the same mistake. Get out there and work on that serve. Don't listen to all that garbage about "she can't learn to serve as well because she's a girl" nonsense. I'm one of the most untalented people on the face of this earth and even my serve is starting to produce some serious heat. So no excuses. Work on it. Make sure to start off right, using the continental grip. If you take a lesson where the coach tells you to start off with an eastern forehand grip, tell him to teach you the continental gripped serve or else you're out of there. Muscle memory is a powerful thing, so if you learn something a certain way it will be very difficult and frustrating to change later on after the incorrect method is already in the blood stream. It takes around 300 repititions to create the motor engrams necessary for a certain technique to become natural to you in a real life context, so practicing often and, more importantly, knowing HOW to practice is very important. Practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. Refer to the free site I've provided below for details about grips and such.

This site (http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com)has a ton of great information, especially for beginners, that will really take your game somewhere in a hurry, and it's absolutely free. You can thank our very own Will Hamilton, of these forums for this. :)

Step 3: Buy apparel that will distact any male opponents. Look to Ana Ivanovic for perfect examples of this. :)

Step 4: Profit.

Best of luck to you,

Matt

P.S. Could you make your email public for now, by any chance? I'd love to drop you an email sometime.

tin
02-02-2009, 07:37 PM
^ thanks guys =)...to djokovifan4life:i sent my e-mail ad to you...please confirm if you've received it. i'd be glad to receive some more tennis tips...=) on step 1:that won't be a problem, we don't have walmart here....lol

oneguy21
02-02-2009, 08:20 PM
Don't expect to go out and start hitting like Sharapova.

Start out slow and develop the fundamentals. Since you're a beginner try to focus on consistency. A good drill might be starting to rally from service box to service box and gradually working your way to the baseline.

I suggest right now, use a one handed forehand like everyone else and a two handed backhand.

In terms of equipment, just buy a prestrung racquet at your local sporting goods store. Assuming you're serious about tennis, don't a buy a Spongebob or a Dora racquet. I suggest a good oversize frame with the right size grip.


Make sure to follow through on your ground strokes. Don't push balls back.

On your forehand use a western grip and hit a windshield wiper forehand with some serious racquet head speed. - no just kidding...research some of the forehand grips on google (fairly easy) and find one you feel comfortable with. You'll probably feel most comfortable with an eastern.

If you're athletic, developing good footwork won't be a problem.

Good luck.

Djokovicfan4life
02-02-2009, 08:28 PM
Don't expect to go out and start hitting like Sharapova.

Start out slow and develop the fundamentals. Since you're a beginner try to focus on consistency. A good drill might be starting to rally from service box to service box and gradually working your way to the baseline.

I suggest right now, use a one handed forehand like everyone else and a two handed backhand.

In terms of equipment, just buy a prestrung racquet at your local sporting goods store. Assuming you're serious about tennis, don't a buy a Spongebob or a Dora racquet. I suggest a good oversize frame with the right size grip.


Make sure to follow through on your ground strokes. Don't push balls back.

On your forehand use a western grip and hit a windshield wiper forehand with some serious racquet head speed. - no just kidding...research some of the forehand grips on google (fairly easy) and find one you feel comfortable with. You'll probably feel most comfortable with an eastern.

If you're athletic, developing good footwork won't be a problem.

Good luck.

You had me until that footwork thing. I really hope that I'm misunderstanding what you're trying to say here. Good footwork does not come naturally to anyone, even Roger Federer. In fact, he still credits a great deal of his losses to poor movement on his part! A little telling, no? You see what I'm saying here?

Good footwork is not simply acquired. Good footwork is LEARNED. This is what sets apart the great players from the mediocre ones. The ones who are willing to accept the fact that the feet are everything in tennis are the ones who go far in the game. There is way too much focus on the upper body in tennis. I reality, it's your feet that really get you somewhere in the end.

Matt

futuratennis
02-03-2009, 12:08 AM
i wouldnt bother buying all that stuff right now, see if you actually like it first, borrow a racquet from a club and maybe have a lesson with a coach, then if you decide you like it, keep having those lessons, THEN buy all the apparel, better racquet etc.