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The_Steak
02-02-2009, 06:57 PM
Recently I have been using a full western grip. I have had my good and bad days. What I am most annoyed with is when I hit the topspin lobs on the run and such. What I can do with this grip is sometimes flatten it out to hit good winners. But I can not always do this and when I do not I hit up easy balls for the opponent to put me in a defensive position.

Continental with a little bit turned to a western seems to be the most natural for me. I have hit with it on a wall and I like it but have not tried it on the courts.

Is it better to stay with the old grip or try the new one and what are the advantages/disadvantages of both grips?

sukivan
02-02-2009, 07:20 PM
continental with a little bit turned to western?
you're going to have to be a bit more specific than that

its also possible you're completely out to lunch about what grip is what

LeeD
02-03-2009, 09:22 AM
As above.
A continental turned towards western is a EASTERN forehand grip. That grip is old school, tends to hit slight topspin with lots of flat, low margin for error, but great for hitting a fast, penetrating forehand with little hitter effort.
I think you have to review your grips again, and make sure you know which is which...

Djokovicfan4life
02-03-2009, 09:43 AM
As above.
A continental turned towards western is a EASTERN forehand grip. That grip is old school, tends to hit slight topspin with lots of flat, low margin for error, but great for hitting a fast, penetrating forehand with little hitter effort.
I think you have to review your grips again, and make sure you know which is which...

Perhaps, or maybe he's actually talking about moving the hand the opposite way, giving him a sort of semi Hawaiian grip, haha!

LeeD
02-03-2009, 09:49 AM
:):):)
Steak.... western grips promote lots of topspin, at the expense of ball speed. You need to swing out to get the superior ball speed and spin.
Continental grips tend to hit flat or side, with some slice, but the ball moves pretty much faster than western grips.... with less effort. WITH LESS EFFORT!
Eastern grips are a compromise.... does lots, doesn't to anything really well, unless you're practiced by years of hitting. I like Eastern grips because I'm getting old and the deltoids don't work much anymore. I use SW forehands.
The grip you use is YOUR choice. If you hit ballon balls your opponent crushes, you better increase the speed and placement with whatever works for you.... proper footwork, shoulder turn, swing harder, change to flatter grip, whatever.....
I love Hawaiin BBQ's and plate lunches

The_Steak
02-03-2009, 01:27 PM
Oh sorry, eastern grip.

Thanks for the reply. I will see what works for me.

Tomek_tennis
02-04-2009, 06:55 AM
Seimiwestern is all you really need. Don't go western.

raiden031
02-04-2009, 08:15 AM
Seimiwestern is all you really need. Don't go western.

semi-westen is the most popular grip. You get the best of all worlds...good topspin and ability to hit flatter and handle low balls as well.

GeorgeLucas
02-04-2009, 12:25 PM
:):):)
Steak.... western grips promote lots of topspin, at the expense of ball speed. You need to swing out to get the superior ball speed and spin.
Continental grips tend to hit flat or side, with some slice, but the ball moves pretty much faster than western grips.... with less effort. WITH LESS EFFORT!
Eastern grips are a compromise.... does lots, doesn't to anything really well, unless you're practiced by years of hitting. I like Eastern grips because I'm getting old and the deltoids don't work much anymore. I use SW forehands.
The grip you use is YOUR choice. If you hit ballon balls your opponent crushes, you better increase the speed and placement with whatever works for you.... proper footwork, shoulder turn, swing harder, change to flatter grip, whatever.....
I love Hawaiin BBQ's and plate lunches

You make a continental forehand sound practical. In the modern game, it definitely isn't.

The_Steak
02-04-2009, 01:14 PM
You make a continental forehand sound practical. In the modern game, it definitely isn't.
Wait, are you saying in today's modern spin game, that the flatter shots will be harder to pull off and beat people?

LeeD
02-04-2009, 02:00 PM
I said Cont forehands hit fast with little player effort. I did NOT say it's practical, easy, or more effective. I use SW forehands.
Most of my compeitive tennis life, I used eastern forehands. Never got it down. Of course, I haven't gotten the SW forehand down either:confused:
Since I use SW forehands, I must agree that's the way to go.

GeorgeLucas
02-04-2009, 03:19 PM
Wait, are you saying in today's modern spin game, that the flatter shots will be harder to pull off and beat people?

Exactly. The problem with the continental grip lies in its contact point and spin. Per contact point, the continental is suited for taking balls at or beneath the hip, making dealing with high balls nigh impossible. And per the issue of spin, the grip places your hand above the ball. That's not good. Even worse how the continental grip opens up the racquet face. These two things spell certain doom for our friend topspin.

LeeD
02-04-2009, 03:45 PM
Depending on skill level of course....
In DOUBLES 4.0, a continental only grip forehand can work just fine. Slice low crosscourt for returns, lob over the netman when he poaches, and move forward to volley.
In singles, maybe you'll just get killed:shock::confused:

onehandbh
02-04-2009, 03:49 PM
:):):)
You need to swing out to get the superior ball speed and spin.


Totally true. Also, at a certain point it the limiting factor to keeping the ball
in becomes topspin. More spin allows you to take a bigger cut on low balls
b/c if you hit flat the ball would sail out.

I use a semi-western, though I would consider using a western if I had a
bigger racquet.

LeeD
02-04-2009, 05:03 PM
Don't know why racket head size has anything to do with it...
I normally play with a 95. When I switch to my old doubles racket, a 115, not much diff except for less mishits in bad lighting conditions.
I can't hit harder (actually softer), I can't swing faster (it's bigger and air draggy), it's a full 2. something oz lighter, but my game is my game, my strokes the same, and it don't matter which of the two rackets I use....if I can see the ball.

onehandbh
02-04-2009, 06:02 PM
Don't know why racket head size has anything to do with it...
I normally play with a 95. When I switch to my old doubles racket, a 115, not much diff except for less mishits in bad lighting conditions.
I can't hit harder (actually softer), I can't swing faster (it's bigger and air draggy), it's a full 2. something oz lighter, but my game is my game, my strokes the same, and it don't matter which of the two rackets I use....if I can see the ball.

A wider hitting area allows you to swing w/a greater tilt (grip towards
western) and have more margin for error.

LeeD
02-04-2009, 06:29 PM
If you think so, it must be true to you....
Not for me. That bigger head DOES allow more mishits to go in, but in the long run, it's worst for your game because you might tend to think it's not so important to hit dead center and watch the ball. Also, each of those mishits tend to wear and tear your arm, elbow, and shoulders. The bigger frame has more air drag, and you HAVE to hit more groundies to make up for your lack of big serves.
:shock::shock:
Notice every racket company still makes a 90 sq. in racket, thos you all consider it just a curiosity. If you ever try hitting with one, you'd find the serves unreal, the big hard shots really nice, the volleys really clean, and yes, us old farts tend to mishit lots.
Dats why my normal racket is a 95, and not smaller.

tennisfreak15347
02-04-2009, 06:36 PM
Depending on skill level of course....
In DOUBLES 4.0, a continental only grip forehand can work just fine. Slice low crosscourt for returns, lob over the netman when he poaches, and move forward to volley.
In singles, maybe you'll just get killed:shock::confused:

yes, it would work, but it still isn't good. you're basically saying slice all forehand groundstrokes.

LeeD
02-05-2009, 09:18 AM
If you actually TRY hitting some Continental forehands, you'll discover than topspin is easy to hit, if the incoming ball is somewhat lower than hip heights.
In good doubles, the whole concept revolves around hitting the ball really LOW to an opponent, forcing them to hit UP so the volley is a chest high putaway.
Think for a second !!! Think again.
Continental forehands are MADE to hit low incoming balls!
Maybe it's not so bad for 4.0 doubles, eh ?? :shock:

Djokovicfan4life
02-05-2009, 09:27 AM
There are plenty of older players that use the continental grip. It most certainly can be used today, so long as it's clear that the player is not interested in learning the more efficient technique that is the modern day forehand. So LeeD is absolutely correct here.

Remember that most older guys have a tendency to flip out at the concept of change.

Matt