PDA

View Full Version : Ken Flac, swing the volley??


yellowoctopus
02-02-2009, 09:18 PM
My respect to Ken Flac for his accomplishments, but is it right to teach people to swing your volley?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kfARkoq7yM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bAEFnwSvTk

Djokovicfan4life
02-02-2009, 10:38 PM
That Verdasco-style backswing is a little much, IMO, but he's absolutely right about the racquet speed concept when it comes to volleys. Being afraid to "swing" at all is not good, and leads to a weak, underpowered volley. The key is to accelerate the racquet using only around 6 inches or so of actually distance for the racquet head to travel. Use the idea of a wall that he referenced at the start of the video for a guideline of how far to take the racquet back, and most importantly, take it back with the coiling of the body rather than the arm. From here, all you need to do is simply "punch" towards the ball. Think of it as a karate chop. Economical, yet oh, so effective.

If you're still not getting it, you can try lighting a candle and practicing blowing it out by using your hand, while only using 6 inches or less of actual distance.

Best of luck to you,

Matt

LeeD
02-03-2009, 08:18 AM
I suspect Ken is trying to show a lengthened volley stroke for all beginners to follow the path of the racket. Yes, the takeback is exageratedly long, but it shows a smooth, somewhat level swing, rather than a CHOP motion.
Ken and RobertSeguso were once the #1 ranked doubles team, so he does know how to volley. As lesser players, we should consider shortening the stroke to suit or skills.

Djokovicfan4life
02-03-2009, 08:24 AM
Hmmm, very interesting! Yes, I think you may be correct in saying that this video is all about the swing path rather than the actual distance covered. Personally, I find the karate chop analogy to be an excellent way of learning a stable, compact volley though.

LeeD
02-03-2009, 08:33 AM
Seems to me, a karate chop tends to add all spin and little depth.
I like the analogy of "cupping" the ball, as told to me back in 1975 but one ArtLarsen. He said, don't chop, but cup the ball with your palm catching the backside bottom of the ball, to impart SOME underspin, but not a lot. The entire arm stroke, by itself, makes for short volleys. But when coupled with forward movement of the player, good body turn, it gets the volley to the baseline, just about the right amount of depth.
He told me a static volley should be short, in case you need the short volley, and when depth is needed, it's the body that gives the added depth.

Djokovicfan4life
02-03-2009, 08:54 AM
Like I said, different references work for different players. For me, the karate chop is mostly just a forward punch which simply focuses on generating maximum racquet speed while covering a relatively short distance for the perfect blend of power, stabilty, and control on the volley.

Slicendicer
02-03-2009, 09:56 AM
That Verdasco-style backswing is a little much, IMO, but he's absolutely right about the racquet speed concept when it comes to volleys. Being afraid to "swing" at all is not good, and leads to a weak, underpowered volley. The key is to accelerate the racquet using only around 6 inches or so of actually distance for the racquet head to travel. Use the idea of a wall that he referenced at the start of the video for a guideline of how far to take the racquet back, and most importantly, take it back with the coiling of the body rather than the arm. From here, all you need to do is simply "punch" towards the ball. Think of it as a karate chop. Economical, yet oh, so effective.

If you're still not getting it, you can try lighting a candle and practicing blowing it out by using your hand, while only using 6 inches or less of actual distance.

Best of luck to you,

Matt

That is correct. And "cupping" the ball will impart underspin and/or sidespin which will make the volley penetrate the court and less apt to bounce high... making a tougher shot for your opponent to return without popping it up.