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tennis_balla
02-03-2009, 04:51 PM
PTR, USPTA, ITF certification or others....

Which did you choose?
Why?
Regret it?
Did you learn anything while taking/studying for the exam?
...just curious about peoples comments thats all, more info the better!

Thanks

tennis_balla
02-03-2009, 09:59 PM
33 views and not a single reply? Come on this is the Tennis Tips/Instruction board, everyone here gives advice but no one certified? :-P

Well anyways, here's a long shot....

Has anyone done the Sanchez-Casal Weekly Coaches Course out in their Barcelona facility? Experiences? Thoughts?


Anyone? Anyone? Bueller? Bueller? :mrgreen:

Djokovicfan4life
02-03-2009, 10:19 PM
Good timing! I just signed up for my first course in a 5 course series to become a certified instructor in the ACE system of coaching. GOTTA try and get at least a little sleep here though. Will expand on this decision further at another time.

Feel free to shoot me an email as well if you would prefer to discuss this privately.

Matt

julian
02-04-2009, 04:15 PM
PTR, USPTA, ITF certification or others....

Which did you choose?
Why?
Regret it?
Did you learn anything while taking/studying for the exam?
...just curious about peoples comments thats all, more info the better!

Thanks
Think about a question in a title of this post

tennis_balla
02-04-2009, 05:11 PM
I'm just curious, nothing more. I'm a coach myself and just curious what others have done in their coaching career.

julian
02-04-2009, 05:48 PM
I'm just curious, nothing more. I'm a coach myself and just curious what others have done in their coaching career.

I would suggest to try USPTA but I am biased being USPTA
certified.My signature below specifies my tennis Web site if of interest.
I live in Boston suburbs just to make a conversation a bit more specific.

Crusher10s
02-04-2009, 06:11 PM
OK, here's my deal: I'm USPTA certified and I can tell you it was no cake walk to take and pass their exam.

There were 3 major sections of the exam: The written test, the actual tennis skills test and the ability to conduct both a private and a group lesson. There was also a grip test and demonstration and a stroke analysis section.

I looked into getting PTR certified but around here there's more status to being USPTA certified due to what some say is the difficulty and thoroughness of the USPTA exam.

I think it's probably a little easier now because you don't have to travel to take the written exam or the stroke analysis sections because you can actually take those sections online now.

fuzz nation
02-04-2009, 07:04 PM
I finally certified with the USPTA last April after thinking about it for a couple of years. I had already had a few years of high school coaching and a bit of teaching experience, but going through the process was a positive step for me. I learned a lot about how to make a productive lesson happen for an individual and also for a group, got better at understanding stroke mechanics, and everyone in our group had good tips to share. The study material even covers some of the realities to consider when running a tennis business. I also did the Certification Review Course before my test and that gave me some really solid guidance on positive teaching methods.

I'm not trying to network like crazy and become the next guru to run an academy in Florida, but I wanted to get more competent as a teacher and coach once I got my teeth into it and started enjoying the work. The guy who got me on board as an assistant coach at the nearby high school has been with the USPTA pretty much forever and he gave me a little familiarity with the aspects of certifying with them. A few of my pals have certified with the PTR and they seem to like that group just fine, but I appreciate that the USPTA isn't quite so rigid with their prescribed teaching methods. As I understand it, the PTR has one way for teaching each stroke, etc.

Anybody who likes to teach or coach can learn and accomplish plenty without getting any certifications. I think that a lot of the craft is learned by doing it and there's plenty of studying that can be done without going anywhere near an organization. My certification provides me with liability coverage and makes supplemental health coverage available for my students in case of an injury on the courts. That's a huge advantage both for teaching on my own as well as for helping to qualify me for more formal positions. I may run a small program next summer and that insurance will be essential for me.

tennis_balla
02-04-2009, 07:08 PM
Maybe I'm being misunderstood with the point of starting this thread. I'm not really concerned as to which is better and so on or which to take as that could end up in a heated argument :-P but thanks for that so far guys especially fuzz nation, that was the kinda stuff I was looking for.

Just wanted to start this to get a discussion going about certification in general. Your experiences in doing the exams itself, why you chose that particular certification, if you feel like that particular program helped you be a better coach and so on.
I know this might not go very far as most of the posters here are from the states and it'll be either USPTA or PTR but I'm also hoping for some responses from other places as well. Its always been interesting to hear different opinions from different coaches for me.

fuzz nation
02-05-2009, 06:40 AM
Canada rules!

...I got to go with my family (parents & sisters) out to Lake Louise a couple of years ago... and it ruled... I'm from New England - lots of grumpy people and no Rocky Mtn's here...

After having certified, I didn't feel like I'd been assimilated into the USPTA collective, but it made me want to learn a lot more. I've even become a lot more interested in the psychological aspects of coaching because for these kids, I think it's at least half the battle. Knowing the tricks and tips for making let's say a solid backhand is essential, but in my limited experience, positive guidance in the realm of effective head management is darn near revolutionary, at least for the kids.

...more coffee...

tennis_balla
02-05-2009, 02:03 PM
Yea its interesting the things you learn on your own on a tennis court while coaching. When I first got into it I had a tough time telling people that could be old enough to be my parents to go pick up balls, stand here stand there and pretty much order them around, move their feet etc. Then of course you quickly realize thats what they want haha....of course as long as you know what you're doing and helping their game in the process which is what they are there for.

The psychological aspect of the game is always interesting, and its hardly the same for any 2 people I found. Its always in their head of course and once you get through to that you're golden. You can drill into their heads about how to hit a backhand for example but if you're using the wrong choice of words, examples and so on you might as well be speaking in Chinese to them. Theres always that one light bulb moment with each person where they understand exactly what you mean, just gotta find it. Toughest part in coaching? hmm I found that coaching in tennis academies in North America a lot of the times is babysitting and unfortunately some kids are there because their parents sent them there not because they really want to be there. Trying to get a 16 year old girl who's a bit moody to move her feet at 10 o'clock morning practice is a lost cause haha.

Djokovicfan4life
02-05-2009, 02:06 PM
OK, here's my deal: I'm USPTA certified and I can tell you it was no cake walk to take and pass their exam.

There were 3 major sections of the exam: The written test, the actual tennis skills test and the ability to conduct both a private and a group lesson. There was also a grip test and demonstration and a stroke analysis section.

I looked into getting PTR certified but around here there's more status to being USPTA certified due to what some say is the difficulty and thoroughness of the USPTA exam.

I think it's probably a little easier now because you don't have to travel to take the written exam or the stroke analysis sections because you can actually take those sections online now.
Yes, analysis skills are an absolute must have. The most important step you can ever take as a coach is to learn how to help yourself.

Matt

julian
02-07-2009, 07:15 AM
Canada rules!

...I got to go with my family (parents & sisters) out to Lake Louise a couple of years ago... and it ruled... I'm from New England - lots of grumpy people and no Rocky Mtn's here...

After having certified, I didn't feel like I'd been assimilated into the USPTA collective, but it made me want to learn a lot more. I've even become a lot more interested in the psychological aspects of coaching because for these kids, I think it's at least half the battle. Knowing the tricks and tips for making let's say a solid backhand is essential, but in my limited experience, positive guidance in the realm of effective head management is darn near revolutionary, at least for the kids.

...more coffee...

you may consider using www.tennisplayer.net available free for uspta members

ckthegreek
02-07-2009, 08:23 AM
I'm PTR certified and would definitely recommend it. The 5-day TTE course has a standard format across the world which means you can take your qualification anywhere.

You need to pass 5 exams: Playing skills, Error detection (this is great), a written paper on all aspects of tennis (tough), Drills and, of course, teaching.

PTR is a good organisation that looks after its members.