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superslam
02-04-2009, 02:56 PM
when hitting a forehand should your wrist be loose as well as your grip?

I play with an eastern fh with a firm grip is that bad mechanics?

GeorgeLucas
02-04-2009, 03:12 PM
TW posters tend to get really longwinded about a question like this. I'll summarize just about everyone's post from this point on by saying: Your forehand grip should be loose.


edit: Regarding your grip. An eastern forehand grip is fine, but perhaps not practical for the modern topspin game. As your game evolves, try bringing your grip around to the western side. You'll find it easier to generate topspin and deal with higher balls.

Djokovicfan4life
02-04-2009, 03:17 PM
A great tip that I heard from BB is to treat the racquet as if you were holding a bird. You don't want to hurt it, yet you don't want it to fly away either.

habib
02-04-2009, 05:23 PM
A great tip that I heard from BB is to treat the racquet as if you were holding a bird. You don't want to hurt it, yet you don't want it to fly away either.

If your racket truly loves you, if you let it fly away it should come back. ;-)

Alafter
02-04-2009, 07:04 PM
WE havent answered him about his wrist yet. I want to know this as well. Heard all sorts of things.

dmastous
02-04-2009, 08:03 PM
For me, both the wrist and grip are fairly loose until the point of contact. Not limp, but flexible. As the racquet reaches the point of contact, both the grip, and wrist firm up, then after contact they relax again. Same as before, not complely loose, just enough to allow freedom of moment.

Alafter
02-04-2009, 08:11 PM
For me, both the wrist and grip are fairly loose until the point of contact. Not limp, but flexible. As the racquet reaches the point of contact, both the grip, and wrist firm up, then after contact they relax again. Same as before, not complely loose, just enough to allow freedom of moment.

Got it. Firm up to the point of climax, explode, and then go limp.

Steady Eddy
02-04-2009, 08:12 PM
A great tip that I heard from BB is to treat the racquet as if you were holding a bird. You don't want to hurt it, yet you don't want it to fly away either.I saw that tip in a Sam Snead book explaining how you should hold the golf club.

tennisfreak15347
02-04-2009, 08:15 PM
A great tip that I heard from BB is to treat the racquet as if you were holding a bird. You don't want to hurt it, yet you don't want it to fly away either.

that's a great example.

gzhpcu
02-04-2009, 08:29 PM
It is also helpful to think of holding the racket with your last three fingers. Helps to keep the grip loose, yet not wristy. On the serve, just the opposite: emphasis on the thumb and top finger to keep your wrist loose.

OnyxZ28
02-04-2009, 08:30 PM
Got it. Firm up to the point of climax, explode, and then go limp.

LMAO. Cheeky.

foLster
02-04-2009, 08:38 PM
Got it. Firm up to the point of climax, explode, and then go limp.

Oh my god.

Bud
02-04-2009, 10:53 PM
when hitting a forehand should your wrist be loose as well as your grip?

I play with an eastern fh with a firm grip is that bad mechanics?

Fairly loose with a relaxed grip but not so loose and relaxed the racquet is going to be knocked from your hand upon ball impact :p

Bud
02-04-2009, 10:54 PM
Got it. Firm up to the point of climax, explode, and then go limp.

:shock::shock::shock:

We're talking tennis here... hello :)

mucat
02-04-2009, 11:00 PM
Got it. Firm up to the point of climax, explode, and then go limp.

Always wear an overgrip.

adams_1
02-04-2009, 11:02 PM
Always wear an overgrip.

And make sure you wrap it correctly, all the way to the end of the grip.

Some of your friends might say they don't bother wrapping all the way, they only need it halfway, but you need to do it properly.

skierpaul
02-04-2009, 11:09 PM
It is also helpful to think of holding the racket with your last three fingers. Helps to keep the grip loose, yet not wristy. On the serve, just the opposite: emphasis on the thumb and top finger to keep your wrist loose.

This works well for me, particularly on serves and overheads.

mucat
02-04-2009, 11:09 PM
And make sure you wrap it correctly, all the way to the end of the grip.

Some of your friends might say they don't bother wrapping all the way, they only need it halfway, but you need to do it properly.

And don't ever flip it around to reuse it.

akybo
02-05-2009, 12:58 AM
It is also helpful to think of holding the racket with your last three fingers. Helps to keep the grip loose, yet not wristy. On the serve, just the opposite: emphasis on the thumb and top finger to keep your wrist loose.
A good example!
From my own experience trying to have a relaxed grip transformed into a wristy shot and loose control,but then emphasis(even I didnt do it conciously) of holding with the last 3 fingers I found out this is the key.
Great advice "gzhpcu"!

Alafter
02-05-2009, 02:02 AM
Oh my god.

I actually thought this was the funniest comment.

Tomek_tennis
02-05-2009, 02:10 AM
Firm but not tense. Not loosy!

LeeD
02-05-2009, 09:01 AM
Yeh ! Excellent advice, gzhpcu. :):)

Djokovicfan4life
02-05-2009, 09:30 AM
WE havent answered him about his wrist yet. I want to know this as well. Heard all sorts of things.

This is the most over discussed topic on these boards......seriously. Do a search and look for BB's posts on the subject. He can only say the same things so many times, you know.

Djokovicfan4life
02-05-2009, 09:34 AM
Firm but not tense. Not loosy!

Disagree. The elasticity in the wrist is what generates racquet head speed and spin. However, this should be developed as a player's technique and timing begin to improve. There is too much emphasis placed on racquet head speed at the lower levels of the game and not enough on clean contact and timing. So in a way, we're both correct. But I believe that the goal should eventually be a very loose, relaxed swing, ala Federer, Verdasco, Safin, Djokovic, etc.

Matt

Tomek_tennis
02-05-2009, 03:09 PM
You are talking about forearm not wrist, right? Using loosy wrist or using it in a proactive way is the 1st step to injuring yourself...

Tomek_tennis
02-05-2009, 03:21 PM
OK, I think I know why we misunderstood each other. I thought about contact point. Never mind, you last post says how it is...

Currently I am a coach, but after few years of not playing tournamens I started to train some more. Tried to experiment with proactive use of wrist during the contact and it wasn't a good idea. I think, that as you wrote, it's more important to focus on wrist, forearm, elbow action, during earlier swing phases. At contact wrist should be in pretty stable position, that can take some shock...