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crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 11:57 AM
I improved my anticipation while receiving the serves after watching Australian Open doubles (ladies double and mixed double) final. I can tell the direction of the serve by the trajectory after the ball left the serverís hand.

How can I anticipate a dropshot? Any suggestions much appreciated.

Djokovicfan4life
02-06-2009, 12:01 PM
Work on your first step speed technique: update to come shortly.

Matt

Slicendicer
02-06-2009, 12:22 PM
I improved my anticipation while receiving the serves after watching Australian Open doubles (ladies double and mixed double) final. I can tell the direction of the serve by the trajectory after the ball left the serverís hand.

How can I anticipate a dropshot? Any suggestions much appreciated.

Really the only way to anticipate a drop shot is to identify when is an optimal time for your opponent to hit a dropper. If you are out of position, if the ball lands short... stuff like that.

Looking to your opponent for signs would be another scenario. If your opponent hits the dropper within a pattern. If you see a grip change... stuff like that. Anytime your opponent hits a slice BH... figure it could be a dropshot, or a poorly executed slice.

The best defense for the drop shot is early preparation and good footwork. Meaning, if you identify the dropshot, react immediately... know what you want to do before you hit the ball... either send the ball deep or re-dropshot.

Geezer Guy
02-06-2009, 01:08 PM
Watch your opponents racquet. On the forehand side you'll see him switch from a topspin grip to an open-faced grip. On the backhand - especially a 1HBH - you'll see the grip change to a contenental/slice grip. That doesn't mean a DS is comming for sure, because they may just hit a slice, but it's an indication one MAY be coming. With a 2HBH, watch for the off hand to drop. Players with a 2HBH usually hit a DS with just 1 hand. Also, DS's are usually hit with much more lift than a slice, so as soon as you see the ball start to float, take off!

junbumkim
02-06-2009, 01:35 PM
I improved my anticipation while receiving the serves after watching Australian Open doubles (ladies double and mixed double) final. I can tell the direction of the serve by the trajectory after the ball left the serverís hand.

How can I anticipate a dropshot? Any suggestions much appreciated.

A lot of factors can play in anticipation. Your opponent's body position, his position on the court, his tendency, his backswing, and so on. Also playing percentage based on the geometry of the court.

Drop shot is probably the easiest to notice if you pay attention. A lot of times, you can usually tell by their backswing.

LeeD
02-06-2009, 01:44 PM
I TRY to watch mainly the backswing. Long, it's gonna be a drive. Short and to the side, better get ready to get on your wheels.
Since I drop forehand with a SW grip, and drop backhand with my hard slice grip, it's hard to read. When I change to easternbackhand for a topspinner, I don't drop shot.
Anticipation is like chess. You play enough, you recognize certain tendencies in certain players. Some will never drop shot, other's use it too often.
When I drop shot, it's not to win the point, in any manner or form. It's to surprise the opponent, make him run (followed by a deep lob), and to change his comfort zone.

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 04:20 PM
Really the only way to anticipate a drop shot is to identify when is an optimal time for your opponent to hit a dropper. If you are out of position, if the ball lands short... stuff like that.

Looking to your opponent for signs would be another scenario. If your opponent hits the dropper within a pattern. If you see a grip change... stuff like that. Anytime your opponent hits a slice BH... figure it could be a dropshot, or a poorly executed slice.

The best defense for the drop shot is early preparation and good footwork. Meaning, if you identify the dropshot, react immediately... know what you want to do before you hit the ball... either send the ball deep or re-dropshot.
Great stuff~ Thank you~

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 04:23 PM
Watch your opponents racquet. On the forehand side you'll see him switch from a topspin grip to an open-faced grip. On the backhand - especially a 1HBH - you'll see the grip change to a contenental/slice grip. That doesn't mean a DS is comming for sure, because they may just hit a slice, but it's an indication one MAY be coming. With a 2HBH, watch for the off hand to drop. Players with a 2HBH usually hit a DS with just 1 hand. Also, DS's are usually hit with much more lift than a slice, so as soon as you see the ball start to float, take off!
Watch for grip change...Yes! Once the ball start to float....Run!!!:)

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 04:25 PM
A lot of factors can play in anticipation. Your opponent's body position, his position on the court, his tendency, his backswing, and so on. Also playing percentage based on the geometry of the court.

Drop shot is probably the easiest to notice if you pay attention. A lot of times, you can usually tell by their backswing.

Always prepare for the drop shot...Ok!
:)

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 04:30 PM
I TRY to watch mainly the backswing. Long, it's gonna be a drive. Short and to the side, better get ready to get on your wheels.
Since I drop forehand with a SW grip, and drop backhand with my hard slice grip, it's hard to read. When I change to easternbackhand for a topspinner, I don't drop shot.
Anticipation is like chess. You play enough, you recognize certain tendencies in certain players. Some will never drop shot, other's use it too often.
When I drop shot, it's not to win the point, in any manner or form. It's to surprise the opponent, make him run (followed by a deep lob), and to change his comfort zone.


I didn't pay too much attention to the backswing before. I need to work on this.

After I drop shot, besides lob what else I can do?

LeeD
02-06-2009, 04:47 PM
Well, they just ran a whole length of court to dig up your dropshot, so you can angle or pass down the line, you can lob, you can groundstroke into their hitting side hip.
I only worry about the dropshot when I'm deep back or wide of the court. Otherwise, it's suicide in MEN's tennis.

Topaz
02-06-2009, 04:51 PM
Well, they just ran a whole length of court to dig up your dropshot, so you can angle or pass down the line, you can lob, you can groundstroke into their hitting side hip.
I only worry about the dropshot when I'm deep back or wide of the court. Otherwise, it's suicide in MEN's tennis.

So, suicide in Men's tennis, but widely used on the ATP tour. Interesting statement.

beckham
02-06-2009, 04:53 PM
check if your opponent holds back and watch the racquet face and take back.

LeeD
02-06-2009, 05:05 PM
Topaz, can you hit like the top 40 pro mens?
I cannot, and I play mens tennis, so my most forcing shots are nothing compared to the pros. When I drop shot, my opponent is nowhere near as far off the court as the pros.
Suicide meaning my opponent gets to the ball, I have to hit another one, and they usually get to hit another one.
That's a lot of shots to make an error, at MY level.
And they employ it what..... twice a set?

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 05:12 PM
Well, they just ran a whole length of court to dig up your dropshot, so you can angle or pass down the line, you can lob, you can groundstroke into their hitting side hip.
I only worry about the dropshot when I'm deep back or wide of the court. Otherwise, it's suicide in MEN's tennis.

"groundstroke into their hitting side hip." -- :):):)

I play mixed double or ladies double and I drop shot only for those ladies who don't run.:???:

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 05:16 PM
How to anticipate a down the line shot?

crystal_clear
02-06-2009, 05:20 PM
How to tell the opponent at the net fake or really poch to attack when playing doubles?

Every time when he/she moves, I ( at the baseline) send the ball into the net. :(((

LeeD
02-06-2009, 05:26 PM
Tough to anticipate where your groundie opponent is gonna hit, except you just warmed up with him, and know a little about his DTL and his crosscourt shots.
As for poachers in doubles..... if he starts to move when you go crosscourt, you must send one out of 5 balls directly HARD right at him, to keep him honest.
If he actually IS poaching, then you gotta go down the line to his vacated spot.
You can lob crosscourt deep to the player at the baseline, then trot to net and anticipate a shot to your partner:):) That's just my case, I'm always paired with the worst of the foursome.
You can lob over the netman, but a shorty means your partner will hate you for a few minutes.
For all the above shots, you should communicate with your partner so he knows the appropriate positioning for your opponents shots.