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OvertheFence
02-09-2009, 12:56 PM
Right now, I seem to have a hard time clearing the net on my flat first serve. Ive been told to hit up, but I don't understand what I should really do. On my 2nd topspin or kick, I know that I should brush up on it, which gets net clearance.

EDit: Things to work on so far:
contact point higher than a foot
push w legs higher
tossing arm extended towards sky

Djokovicfan4life
02-09-2009, 12:58 PM
Most likely you are not driving upwards efficiently with the legs and your contact point is too low. Need a video for further comments.

Matt

oneguy21
02-09-2009, 01:00 PM
Make sure you have a high contact point.

JRstriker12
02-09-2009, 01:02 PM
There could be a lot of causes for your problem.... but one thing I've noticed is that if you drop your head during the serve to see where its going, instead of keeping your head up and watching the racket come through, a lot of the serves go into the net.

Djokovicfan4life
02-09-2009, 01:04 PM
There could be a lot of causes for your problem.... but one thing I've noticed is that if you drop your head during the serve to see where its going, instead of keeping your head up and watching the racket come through, a lot of the serves go into the net.

Yes, this can be fixed by keeping the tossing arm extended towards the sky as long as possible.

LeeD
02-09-2009, 02:34 PM
First flat, don't need to hit up.
Just hit it barely below dead level, the speed takes the ball over the net.
Highest comfortable contact point is the best.
Low margin for error, if you can hit it over 100.

OvertheFence
02-09-2009, 02:53 PM
I think I may need a higher toss/contact point for the serve. My contact point is about a foot above my head and about a meter into the court. Ive been told that I am hitting to the net because my upper body falls down, like one would do if they got punched hard in the stomach.

TennisProdigy
02-09-2009, 02:59 PM
Yeah you definitely need a higher contact point... Only a foot above your head is really low, my contact point is almost 3 feet above my head.

tennisdad65
02-09-2009, 03:04 PM
I think I may need a higher toss/contact point for the serve. My contact point is about a foot above my head and about a meter into the court..

I doubt it is only a foot above your head. a foot lower and you could serve your head. :)

I actually attempted to contact 1 ft above my head just now: I had to hold my racquet horizontally instead of vertically to get to 1 ft

Your racquet itself is >2 ft .. add in the length of your arm from elbow to wrist (atleast 1 ft)and that totals 3 ft..

WildVolley
02-09-2009, 03:44 PM
It seems odd that your contact point would only be a foot above your head.

I think you need to reassess your form. Make sure you are using a continental grip and your hitting arm is fairly straight at contact. I don't think you should be tossing it a meter into the court either when you are learning how to hit a flat serve.

commiboi
02-09-2009, 03:59 PM
Looking back again, I would say its about 2 feet :P Over estimated a foot

commiboi
02-09-2009, 04:01 PM
A foot is like aiming directly to the net

OvertheFence
02-09-2009, 04:13 PM
Any comments on upper body falling down? I dont think I really can "jump into the serve" without this happening

LeeD
02-09-2009, 04:47 PM
By upper body "falling down", do you mean on the followthru after you struck the ball? Yes, that should happen. But AFTER you strike the ball.
Leaning into the court is not terrible, but it IS old fart technique.
Young guy technique is to bend the knees, slightly arch the back, and explode UPWARDS into the service swing, hitting the ball from as high as you can reach, usually like 40" above your head. "LIKE", not exactly.

JRstriker12
02-09-2009, 07:24 PM
Any comments on upper body falling down? I dont think I really can "jump into the serve" without this happening

Keep your off arm extended straight up as long as possible. Keep your chest open to the ball when you explode upwards.

If you are slumping forward, maybe your ball toss is too far in front or to far to the right.