PDA

View Full Version : What to charge for stringing lessons?


jamauss
02-13-2009, 02:55 PM
So, some guy came into the tennis complex that I string racquets for asking for a "stringing lesson". I wasn't there so they just got his number for me.

The thing is, I don't really care to give anyone a "stringing lesson". If I'm going to do this, I want it to be worth my time (my life is busy enough as it is right now).

So, I'm trying to think of what a reasonable amount would be to request (per hour, maybe?) for this stringing lesson. I have no idea if he wants to ask questions for an hour or watch me string a racquet or have me coach him while he strings one or what, I haven't talked to him yet.

What do you guys think? Or should I not even bother and tell the guy no.?

ODYSSEY Mk.4
02-13-2009, 03:02 PM
In my case this guy Ola who drops off at least 8 racquets every 2 weeks since his kids play. i taught him how to do and dont he paid me 75$ per 2 hour lesson we did 4 lessons nice guy he even sold me his stringing machine for damn cheap. i love rich folk
i never gave a $$ amount i just said what every he thought was fair.
so depending on how bad that guy wants lessons from you
and how bad you want to make a buck

jefferson
02-13-2009, 05:35 PM
I have only shown friends or kids who play for me. I have never gotten paid to teach someone how to string. But I guess if it was a stranger, why not make some cheddars? Matter of fact, double dip. While teaching him string a customers racket or two. Then even watch/coach him to string another customers racket! I think you can make some quick money this way.

Some people may think that this is the wrong thing to do, since they are paying for YOU to string it. But you will be watching and he will be doing what you would be doing, right? If he sucks you take over and just show him. No hands on stuff.

Kinda like when you bring your car into the shop. How many times does the actual owner of the shop work on the vehicle? He hires/trains others to work for him. You trust him and his judgement so its okay that he didnt perform the actual work, but I am sure he looks it over, until he fully trusted his workers ability to do the job as he would.

jim e
02-13-2009, 06:03 PM
If you are a member of the USRSA,(actually you can access that part without being a member), you can go on their site and you can look up your state, and see what MRT stringers are charging / hour for stringing lessons. That can give you a range of what would be usual and customary fees for your area.There seems to be a wide degree of difference in hourly rates, even in the same states.It seems like it is left up to the stringer that determines what their time is worth.checking the site can give you an idea.You should be able to access that part of their site without being a member, click on the stringing tab, then get lessons, then enter your state at least it can give you a vague idea of your times worth.

Cruzer
02-14-2009, 05:30 PM
So, some guy came into the tennis complex that I string racquets for asking for a "stringing lesson". I wasn't there so they just got his number for me.

The thing is, I don't really care to give anyone a "stringing lesson". If I'm going to do this, I want it to be worth my time (my life is busy enough as it is right now).

So, I'm trying to think of what a reasonable amount would be to request (per hour, maybe?) for this stringing lesson. I have no idea if he wants to ask questions for an hour or watch me string a racquet or have me coach him while he strings one or what, I haven't talked to him yet.

What do you guys think? Or should I not even bother and tell the guy no.?

It is pretty chintzy to ask someone to pay you for a stringing lesson. It is probably nothing more than letting the guy watch you string a racquet or two and ask a few questions. You don't have to be a Rhodes Scholar to figure out how to string a tennis racquet. Geez, do you charge a fee if someone just asks a question about strings or stringing?
I would gladly show anyone who asked me to give him some help learning to string and not even think about asking to get paid. And yes, I have pretty busy life too. If your life is sooo busy you can't spend an hour or less with someone that wants to learn how to string then don't do it. I hope you don't do it so the poor guy doesn't get gouged by someone who thinks their time is so valuable they have to charge for anything they can get away with.

zacinnc78
02-14-2009, 06:31 PM
what if you sent him a copy of the klippermate manual ? then u save ur own time and dont have to worry about what to charge

jim e
02-14-2009, 07:16 PM
It is pretty chintzy to ask someone to pay you for a stringing lesson. It is probably nothing more than letting the guy watch you string a racquet or two and ask a few questions. You don't have to be a Rhodes Scholar to figure out how to string a tennis racquet. Geez, do you charge a fee if someone just asks a question about strings or stringing?
I would gladly show anyone who asked me to give him some help learning to string and not even think about asking to get paid. And yes, I have pretty busy life too. If your life is sooo busy you can't spend an hour or less with someone that wants to learn how to string then don't do it. I hope you don't do it so the poor guy doesn't get gouged by someone who thinks their time is so valuable they have to charge for anything they can get away with.

Well,There are a good # of stringers,(actually a great # of stringers), listed with the USRSA that lists they will give stringing lessons at an hourly rate, and you tell this person it is chintzy? Why is his time no different. You must think he is different than many others out there.It must be OK for others to do that,and "others" not to. It's not chintzy for teachers to get paid for teaching people the skills that they have, and they get paid well. Is there a discrepancy with this?

Cruzer
02-14-2009, 07:48 PM
Well,There are a good # of stringers,(actually a great # of stringers), listed with the USRSA that lists they will give stringing lessons at an hourly rate, and you tell this person it is chintzy? Why is his time no different. You must think he is different than many others out there.It must be OK for others to do that,and "others" not to. It's not chintzy for teachers to get paid for teaching people the skills that they have, and they get paid well. Is there a discrepancy with this?

Yeah there is a discrepancy with this. We are not discussing a skill that someone went to school for four of more years to learn. As I wrote you don't need to be a Rhodes Scholar to know how to string tennis racquet. If you think it is reasonable to charge someone for something like learning to string a tennis racquet then more power to you and I feel sorry for the poor schmucks you steal money from so they can understand the pretty straightforward task of stringing a tennis racquet. You would probably charge your mother a fee for mowing her lawn.

jim e
02-14-2009, 07:55 PM
No reason to get insulting here, the OP asked a question and I answered it for him, as he said he really did not want to do it, and if he did he wanted to make it worth his while. So I answered his question. No reason to jump on me.

game set match 46 TIMES!!
02-14-2009, 08:25 PM
this is my option.

1 stringing lesson: 45$
2 stringing lessons: 37$
3+: 35$

thats a good price you can ask for more this is just my option.

i only paid 25$ for my coach. but you can ask for more.

blue12
02-14-2009, 08:39 PM
Yeah there is a discrepancy with this. We are not discussing a skill that someone went to school for four of more years to learn. As I wrote you don't need to be a Rhodes Scholar to know how to string tennis racquet. If you think it is reasonable to charge someone for something like learning to string a tennis racquet then more power to you and I feel sorry for the poor schmucks you steal money from so they can understand the pretty straightforward task of stringing a tennis racquet. You would probably charge your mother a fee for mowing her lawn.

I think the main point in the post to consider is that he said he was very busy!
Plus what is very simple to some can be quite a challenge for others.
I guess if somebody offers to pay then why not, because they might turn out to be a major hassle!!

Gosh, I charge my mom to mow her lawn!!!
Kidding!! Just my Grandma!!

blue12
02-14-2009, 08:43 PM
Since you don't care to give any stringing lessons, I would charge 75 dollars an hour and then you won't have to give any stringing lessons, or at least not very many!!!

Steve Huff
02-14-2009, 10:02 PM
I guess my time is worth more than Cruzer's time. I have taught HS kids to string. Some turn around and try to take my business. I really don't mind. As Cruzer points out, it's not rocket science, but there are some shortcuts that sure would have been nice to know. Swim lessons isn't rocket science either, but most people pay for those. Time = money.

ChopSticks
02-15-2009, 01:16 AM
well how many rackets can you string in an hour??? and how much do you charge for those racquets??

ie you can do 2 racquets in 1 hour earning $20 each....then charge him 40~

themitchmann
02-15-2009, 03:07 AM
Well, I guess I shouldn't charge for tennis lessons since I didn't go to school for that.

Yes, I believe you should charge for lessons. Obviously don't overcharge the guy, but the USRSA does have a list of stringers that offer lessons for a fee. If you are a qualified stringer, there is no reason not to charge a reasonable amount. That amount is up to you, but I would say no more than $50 an hour. Remember how much many this guy will save just stringing his own racquets, not to mention if he starts stringing for customers.

YULitle
02-15-2009, 06:12 AM
An hour is a long time to be interacting with someone one-on-one. I charge about $20-25 for math tutoring. I think I would charge around $100 an hour with a two hour minimum for stringing lessons.

davidahenry
02-15-2009, 06:48 AM
I don't see anything wrong with charging money for stringing lessons. As several people have pointed out, time = money.

For those of us who string for others for money, we generally charge a labor fee, right? The labor fee is simply for our time in performing a service. I think that teaching someone to string is the same... You would be performing a service (teaching) that requires your time. And I think you would be performing a very valuable service - one that the person could take to make money for himself/herself. I think a fairly high fee would even be fine.

Sam Chan, a pro tour stringer from the UK, charges for stringing lessons. Check out www.protourstringer.co.uk If he can do it, so can the OP. (Maybe Sam, based on his stringing credentials, can charge a higher rate though. :-))

Just my $0.02. Take care.

DH

jim e
02-15-2009, 06:56 AM
I don't see anything wrong with charging money for stringing lessons. As several people have pointed out, time = money.

For those of us who string for others for money, we generally charge a labor fee, right? The labor fee is simply for our time in performing a service. I think that teaching someone to string is the same... You would be performing a service (teaching) that requires your time. And I think you would be performing a very valuable service - one that the person could take to make money for himself/herself. I think a fairly high fee would even be fine.

Sam Chan, a pro tour stringer from the UK, charges for stringing lessons. Check out www.protourstringer.co.uk If he can do it, so can the OP. (Maybe Sam, based on his stringing credentials, can charge a higher rate though. :-))



Just my $0.02. Take care.

DH
Nice post David, well put!As You said it is a service that they can have the rest of their life,like the old timer that taught me to string back in the 60's . Where when you charge for stringing someones racquet, they get no knowledge for that.
BTW, I like your machine!!!Good choice!

Vermillion
02-15-2009, 07:00 AM
I'd go with 30-35 an hour

davidahenry
02-15-2009, 07:05 AM
Nice post David, well put!As You said it is a service that they can have the rest of their life,like the old timer that taught me to string back in the 60's . Where when you charge for stringing someones racquet, they get no knowledge for that.
BTW, I like your machine!!!Good choice!

Thanks Jim.

Yep - the more and more I string on my machine, the more and more I love it. It is definitely a thing of beauty and makes stringing a dream. But I'm not telling you anything you don't already know. :-)

Take care.

DH

saram
02-15-2009, 10:09 AM
You have to remember that your time and skills are of value. You provide a service that others are not capable of doing and therefore charging for your time in teaching someone else is justified. This may be a person that either just wants to learn for themselves or do it for profit and a side business. If the second is the case--then consider yourself a paid consultant in their quest to earn a profit off of your knowledge.

jim e
02-15-2009, 10:29 AM
Yeah there is a discrepancy with this. We are not discussing a skill that someone went to school for four of more years to learn. As I wrote you don't need to be a Rhodes Scholar to know how to string tennis racquet. If you think it is reasonable to charge someone for something like learning to string a tennis racquet then more power to you and I feel sorry for the poor schmucks you steal money from so they can understand the pretty straightforward task of stringing a tennis racquet. You would probably charge your mother a fee for mowing her lawn.

You know Cruzer, comments like yours are not cared for,when you do not know what you are saying. I am probably the least person on these boards that is a chintzer, as you would say. I give away more services / year to people I feel cannot afford my services, as I am a dentist. I feel very fortunate, and I give away a decent amount of my time each year. And that comment about my mother is very thoughtless on your part, as you have no idea what I do for my 92 year old mother to have her taken care of properly so she can stay in her own home.(And yes, I have a landscaping service take care her yardwork, and I also take care of almost all her needs). You have no idea what I spend on her and her needs/ year along with the time I put in as well as should be by me.In time if you have an elderly parent you may understand!You have no right to comment the way you did.It is always easier to criticize someone else, without being in their shoes!
There are nice,and helpful people on these boards, and there are thoughtless ones who should think before they post!!

saram
02-15-2009, 10:40 AM
There are nice,and helpful people on these boards, and there are thoughtless ones who should think before they post!!

Well said, Jim. And good for you in being kind enough to donate services of yours that some cannot afford. Your offerings have surely brought smiles to those that cannot afford one. People like you make the world go round and round.

zapvor
02-15-2009, 02:02 PM
i taught someone to string for free, but i didn't really have a choice. i was happy to do it though because he was a nice kid. the downside is our first time took almost 3 hours so i had to be there the entire time and skip my lunch. i think it's ok to charge since it is a skill, but at the same time i learned how to string free of charge.

jefferson
02-15-2009, 02:31 PM
An hour is a long time to be interacting with someone one-on-one. I charge about $20-25 for math tutoring. I think I would charge around $100 an hour with a two hour minimum for stringing lessons.

You might want to delete your youtube videos first, they show everything one needs to know and then some. My point is that you post them all filled with your crazy knowledge of the stringing ins and outs for all of us to see for free. I would be surprised if you were to actually charge a kid who was curious to learn about stringing. As I stated earlier I have shown a few kids how to string for free, because I think it is the right thing to do. With that said if someone wants to make money TEACHING another person a trade then by all means go for it. We all have bills to pay and if you can capitalize on a skill that you possess to help pay them, by all means capitalize.