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Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 11:22 AM
Currently teaching at a tennis club, I get the chance to work with up and coming juniors. The other pros tend ask questions to the group looking for the group to answer.

Yesterdays quetsion:

"What is mental toughness?"

*insert juniors blank look*

Juniors today seem to dedicate so much time with technique they totally overlook simple concepts and strategy. So when a question like this came up I really got to see it in action (or not in action if you know what I mean)

So I ask you TW posters: Define Mental Toughness?

Sup's answer: To get the job done by filtering out what you can't use, and empower yourself with what you can.

Caloi
02-17-2009, 11:26 AM
Mental toughness is defined as NOT repeating, "Do not double fault, do NOT double fault" over and over in your head. Once you're past that you're good to go.

Not being a smartarse, that's my mental block. As soon as it comes into my head my serve is 50% the speed it should be to ensure it goes in.:evil:

drakulie
02-17-2009, 11:30 AM
staying focused on what you can and can't do against a particular opponent.

being able to stay focused on the task at hand, even when things aren't going your way.


edit::: love your sig. :)

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 11:36 AM
Mental toughness is defined as NOT repeating, "Do not double fault, do NOT double fault" over and over in your head. Once you're past that you're good to go.

Not being a smartarse, that's my mental block. As soon as it comes into my head my serve is 50% the speed it should be to ensure it goes in.:evil:

Interesting reply. You do mean not repeating the bad things and repeating the good things by telling yourself repetitive reinforcement.

So you adapt to get your game going? Not sure I define that as mental toughness per se.. but its getting there. That is more my next question. What is book smart vs street smarts.

An interesting reply to the question. What is mental toughness.

spot
02-17-2009, 11:37 AM
mental toughness is the ability to learn from the last point without dwelling on the last point.

albino smurf
02-17-2009, 11:40 AM
Nice spot. I'd add keeping it together when things are going wrong for you.

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 11:45 AM
staying focused on what you can and can't do against a particular opponent.

being able to stay focused on the task at hand, even when things aren't going your way.


edit::: love your sig. :)

Sup (using coach voice): So mental toughness= focus? Focus on your options. Focus on what you need to do to get out of a bad situation?

What about when you are ahead? Or hurt? Or tired? Or trying to convince a guy who thinks he is a 5.0 that he is really a 3.5-4.0 with a dismal record and way too much false bravado?

p.s. thought you would like my sig.

PCXL-Fan
02-17-2009, 11:58 AM
Ability to cope with and withstand mental & emotional duress and stress.

The navy seals with the highest level of mental toughness are capable of withstanding water boarding, sleep deprevation and torture the longest before cracking.

Caloi
02-17-2009, 12:14 PM
Interesting reply. You do mean not repeating the bad things and repeating the good things by telling yourself repetitive reinforcement.

So you adapt to get your game going? Not sure I define that as mental toughness per se.. but its getting there. That is more my next question. What is book smart vs street smarts.

An interesting reply to the question. What is mental toughness.

I mean that I tend to start repeating defeating thoughts in my head when I'm down. "I need this point to stay in the set, don't double fault" usually results in a weak kick serve that gets crushed right back into my feet. "I need to get this return in to stay in the point, don't hit it long" usually goes into the net.

If I can instead think about what's been working, even if it's only been one or two good points, then I can relax and implement muscle memory and just swing away.

Booksmart ~vs~ Street smart...booksmart guy read that playing dead instead of running while a charging bear is about to maul him was a good idea. Streetsmart guy knows that you don't have to out run a bear...you just have to out run the guy you're with.

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 12:18 PM
I mean that I tend to start repeating defeating thoughts in my head when I'm down. "I need this point to stay in the set, don't double fault" usually results in a weak kick serve that gets crushed right back into my feet. "I need to get this return in to stay in the point, don't hit it long" usually goes into the net.

If I can instead think about what's been working, even if it's only been one or two good points, then I can relax and implement muscle memory and just swing away.

Booksmart ~vs~ Street smart...booksmart guy read that playing dead instead of running while a charging bear is about to maul him was a good idea. Streetsmart guy knows that you don't have to out run a bear...you just have to out run the guy you're with.

Good reply.

Lol. The bear analogy is pretty darn funny. Keep that for my next thread. Very close.

ShcMad
02-17-2009, 12:24 PM
I define mental toughness as hitting everything as hard as you can despite the outcome.

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 12:27 PM
I define mental toughness as hitting everything as hard as you can despite the outcome.

FAIL

http://i43.tinypic.com/257gg3d.jpg

JRstriker12
02-17-2009, 12:30 PM
Hmmmm.... mental toughness encompasses so many things...

1. Ignoring tiredness/physical pain and being willing to run down one more ball than your opponent or make your opponent hit one more shot.

2. Not letting a bad result or pressure dictate how you play:

Got passed? That shot was too good. I'm going to go back to the net again next point.

Lost the first set? Oh well, next set will be different. How can I make things more difficult for my opponent next set?

Dumped that last backhand? I'm still going to take my full (but controlled) swing at the next backhand I get.

3. Figuring out what your opponent doesn't like and using that against him or her.

4. Focus - not letting you opponent distract you. Staying on track with your game plan and executing.

5. Consistency - Being able to keep that ball in play no matter how many times it comes back. Keeping that stroke relaxed and groved. No rushing overhitting, or pushing.

6. Recognizing key moments in the match and taking advantage.

If it's 15-40 or ad out on your opponent's serve, they just presented you with an opportunity. Make them pay. That one break could decide the set or match.

It's 30-40 on your serve. Going for that running, behind the back, down the line shot is probably not the smartest thing to do.

hollywood9826
02-17-2009, 12:53 PM
^^^^

Well thank you JRStriker for the dissertation. I guess grad school is working out well for you :)

And being the non college learned person will try to make this more sexual in nature so that I may better understand it.

So mental toughness is

When you hittin from the back and its just not working for some reason. Instead of pounding away as hard as you can and hope that it "Works". you change up and hit from the front and at a slightly slower pace. Know if hitting from the front works you are good to go, but if that still dont work. You cannont lose "FOCUS" and get flustered. But instead must switched to the patented peter north side position. And after modify the patented P-North it still doesnt work it probably never will. If you have switch to plan 4 its probably too late to win the so called match.

So mental tougness in a nutshell is

"when all fails go for the patended Peter North side position."

Topaz
02-17-2009, 01:04 PM
Mental toughness = not crying. Even when you really, really want to.

Topaz
02-17-2009, 01:13 PM
I always think about this a lot when I see people talk about the mental fragility of pro players...say for instance, Elena Dementieva.

Of course, her serve is a problem. Only, it isn't a problem in practice, just in matches. That means there is a screw loose, and it really isn't any secret. The thing that gets me is that, *despite* having such horrible serve problems and double faulting like mad, she is ALWAYS able to come back and rely on and use her strengths (insanely awesome groundstrokes) to keep her in the match, and more than often win it!

Then there is Amelie Mauresmo. Again, publicly branded as a head case. Yet, she never gave up, and kept on working until she broke through. She endured all the criticism from the media (ruthless at times) and never gave up.

Those are two mentally tough women, IMO. The still came through and learned to work around or inspite of some pretty big weaknesses.

Personally, I believe that being mentally tough for me (and I do NOT consider myself mentally tough in a tennis match unfortunately) lies in focusing, whether it is on the ball, or on what I need to be doing, and not focusing on the negative (such as 'how the h*ll can I be losing to this person?!? AGAIN?!?'). I am still struggling, as stupid as it sounds, to actually figure out what is going on during a match...why did I win that point, why did I lose that point, what shot should I hit when?

Humbling, for sure.

LuckyR
02-17-2009, 01:22 PM
What Mental Toughness is, exactly will vary from player to player, and even within the same player from match to match. But it all boils down to winning when you shouldn't. For some, it will be becoming detached and unemotional. For others it will entail becoming emotional and lifting your effort, say in a five setter. What it for one guy on a particular day, is not nearly as important as deciding correctly what the situation calls for for you that day.

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 01:44 PM
What Mental Toughness is, exactly will vary from player to player, and even within the same player from match to match. But it all boils down to winning when you shouldn't. For some, it will be becoming detached and unemotional. For others it will entail becoming emotional and lifting your effort, say in a five setter. What it for one guy on a particular day, is not nearly as important as deciding correctly what the situation calls for for you that day.

Good reply. A filtering effect to recognize what you need and what you will not help.

P.S. My original post has my answer in case some missed it. This is getting there.

Lots of different versions but so far the common words are "focus","fighting" and "filtering"

Caloi
02-17-2009, 02:06 PM
[/B]

Sup's answer: To get the job done by filtering out what you can't use, and empower yourself with what you can.

And don't forget, if a bear runs onto the court, make sure you can out run your opponent! :)

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 02:14 PM
And don't forget, if a bear runs onto the court, make sure you can out run your opponent! :)

Brilliant. That bear analogy will surely work for the next thread/question. You must find a picture.

Sup2Dresq
02-17-2009, 02:20 PM
When an answer was tough to arrive at, the juniors were asked:

Who is mentally tough?

Most of them answered: Nadal

So maybe that will help .. why is Nadal Mentally Tough?

*insert more blank junior looks*

http://i176.photobucket.com/albums/w170/jesi3781/532ee388fd8db1e0dab43bfe17d5f0aa-ge.jpg

wihamilton
02-17-2009, 02:48 PM
I would more simply define mental toughness as the ability to sustain and / or elevate your level of play in pressure situations.

prestigeprolover
02-17-2009, 03:04 PM
I define mental toughness as hitting everything as hard as you can despite the outcome.

:lol: this really made me LOL.

dennis10is
02-17-2009, 08:28 PM
I'm an investment banker and in these trouble times, when so many people have lost their life savings, I soldier on and continue to swindle the poor, desperate, dillusional saps who believes me when I tell them that I know how to re-grow their nest eggs.

I'm rich but I remain MENTALLY TOUGH and committed to fleecing every last penny out of my clients.

It is STAYING THE COURSE when parts of you want to quit as you look into the trusting eyes of a little old lady who is half way to senility and you take that last five thousand dollars from her savings account. EYE OF THE TIGER BABY!! Winter is almost over, she doesn't need the heat in apartment and I need another BOTOX treatment.

Tsonga nDance
02-17-2009, 09:08 PM
I think mental toughness is your ability to think clearly during a match and be able to handle the pressure of a match... mentally. Lol

mikeler
02-18-2009, 05:41 AM
I like JRstriker12's post. As to why Nadal has mental toughness I think I can sum it up with 2 examples.

The first example for me was his first Wimbledon final. He was clearly nervous against Federer and lost the first set 6-0. After the changeover, he sprinted out of his chair to the baseline and started jumping around. John McEnroe made a comment that Nadal looked like he had just won the first set 6-0, not lost it. He always had belief that he could win the match. Which leads me to my next example.

I can't remember who Nadal lost against, but a reporter asked him after the match something like "When did you feel like you were going to lose the match?". His blunt answer was something like, "When I lost the last point". He was not joking, the guy never believes he is out of a match until it is over.

Nadal rarely seems to have mental lapses during a match. He is the most steady player I have ever seen from start to finish. My favorite player Mr. Federer can play brilliant in stretches and then patchy in stretches which we saw in the 5th set of the AO.

Sup2Dresq
02-18-2009, 06:04 AM
I like JRstriker12's post. As to why Nadal has mental toughness I think I can sum it up with 2 examples.

The first example for me was his first Wimbledon final. He was clearly nervous against Federer and lost the first set 6-0. After the changeover, he sprinted out of his chair to the baseline and started jumping around. John McEnroe made a comment that Nadal looked like he had just won the first set 6-0, not lost it. He always had belief that he could win the match. Which leads me to my next example.

I can't remember who Nadal lost against, but a reporter asked him after the match something like "When did you feel like you were going to lose the match?". His blunt answer was something like, "When I lost the last point". He was not joking, the guy never believes he is out of a match until it is over.

Nadal rarely seems to have mental lapses during a match. He is the most steady player I have ever seen from start to finish. My favorite player Mr. Federer can play brilliant in stretches and then patchy in stretches which we saw in the 5th set of the AO.

Good specific examples Mikeler.

Like Nadal is filtering emotions and thoughts that he can use and not using what he can't.

One thing we notice with the juniors are the scores after a close first set. Lots of 6-4s, 7-5s followed by 6-1s and 6-0s. I get on the case of my adult clinic guys when I see such a score. Vice versa as well.

Sup2Dresq
02-18-2009, 06:06 AM
I think mental toughness is your ability to think clearly during a match and be able to handle the pressure of a match... mentally. Lol

Post made me lol as well.

I should make a rule the next time that states your direct answers can't have the same words as the question asked.

Still, think we have add more descriptions for a better picture.

Mental toughness = dealing with pressure, thinking clearly, focus, and not dwelling on unproductive thoughts.

drakulie
02-18-2009, 06:17 AM
Mental toughness= coming onto these boards every day, and knowing you are going to be stalked by other posters, and yet having the courage to go on without losing focus on your task at hand(without using the "ignore function") :)

mikeler
02-18-2009, 06:26 AM
FYI, I saw a post by NBMJ yesterday...

JRstriker12
02-18-2009, 06:27 AM
Mental toughness= coming onto these boards every day, and knowing you are going to be stalked by other posters, and yet having the courage to go on without losing focus on your task at hand(without using the "ignore function") :)

I have seen the light! Now I know what it takes to be a TW GOAT! ;)

tfm1973
02-18-2009, 07:04 AM
mental toughness to me is the byproduct of confidence in your abilities which is a byproduct of hours of repetition and physical conditioning. so that conditioning/repetition/confidence/toughness allows you to treat every point the same.

the only difference between the first point of a match (little pressure) and you serving 0-40 in the 5th set of wimbledon finals (huge pressure) is in your mind. they're both only worth 1 point.

Sup2Dresq
02-18-2009, 07:27 AM
mental toughness to me is the byproduct of confidence in your abilities which is a byproduct of hours of repetition and physical conditioning. so that conditioning/repetition/confidence/toughness allows you to treat every point the same.

the only difference between the first point of a match (little pressure) and you serving 0-40 in the 5th set of wimbledon finals (huge pressure) is in your mind. they're both only worth 1 point.

Well done TFM!

ShcMad
02-18-2009, 08:17 AM
:lol: this really made me LOL.

I'm glad I made you laugh, former doubles partner! :)

ShcMad
02-18-2009, 08:19 AM
So, you ask why Nadal is mentally tough?

Because he hits the crap out of the ball every chance he gets, even when he's under pressure.

Sentinel
02-18-2009, 08:30 AM
Mental toughness == not being mentally weak.

Sentinel
02-18-2009, 08:32 AM
Mental toughness= coming onto these boards every day, and knowing you are going to be stalked by other posters, and yet having the courage to go on without losing focus on your task at hand(without using the "ignore function") :)

*big smile* that makes N_F and V very tough mentally.

mordecai
02-18-2009, 08:59 AM
Mental Toughness is the ability to focus on every point with a clear head and deal with every shot as well as you can regardless of distractions.

Distractions include: Your opponent's level, your h2h, the score, the ball (oh look how pretty that shot is), your condition, your level.

raiden031
02-18-2009, 10:36 AM
I would more simply define mental toughness as the ability to sustain and / or elevate your level of play in pressure situations.

This is exactly what I was going to say.

Also within the context of tennis, I think mental toughness is not related to emotion. I often get angry, frustrated, and will yell outbursts, but that doesn't cause me to play worse, and if anything it causes me to play better, because I'm usually in that state because I'm already playing at my worst and its a bit of a mental reset to let out some emotion. Thats why I don't like in doubles when a partner feels the need to comfort me when I'm yelling at myself. Yelling at myself is a release I need.

hollywood9826
02-18-2009, 10:52 AM
mental toughness to me is the byproduct of confidence in your abilities which is a byproduct of hours of repetition and physical conditioning. so that conditioning/repetition/confidence/toughness allows you to treat every point the same.

the only difference between the first point of a match (little pressure) and you serving 0-40 in the 5th set of wimbledon finals (huge pressure) is in your mind. they're both only worth 1 point.

So it has nothing to do with the patented Peter North side position? The guy knows his strenghts and no matter the situation or pressure at hand. he is able to perform at all times no matter what. Thats what seperates the legends from the above average dudes.

Pete had the mental touhness to go for the 2nd serve down the T or out wide, and never faltered when down.


If you want a true mental tough player look at Manny Rameriz. On the outside he may seem like an idiot. But that guys approach to hitting a baseball is 2nd to none. He puts the work in and has the confidence to rely on his abilities. no matter the pressure and the situation, and actually his best moments come when that mental toughness is tested the most.

Aroid on the other hand has no mental toughness he is menatlly frail and almost always folds when put up to the task.

wihamilton
02-18-2009, 11:32 AM
This is exactly what I was going to say.

Also within the context of tennis, I think mental toughness is not related to emotion. I often get angry, frustrated, and will yell outbursts, but that doesn't cause me to play worse, and if anything it causes me to play better, because I'm usually in that state because I'm already playing at my worst and its a bit of a mental reset to let out some emotion. Thats why I don't like in doubles when a partner feels the need to comfort me when I'm yelling at myself. Yelling at myself is a release I need.

Ya McEnroe was great at doing this. Some players can harness emotion to elevate their games, but most can't.

Topaz
02-18-2009, 01:59 PM
Good specific examples Mikeler.

Like Nadal is filtering emotions and thoughts that he can use and not using what he can't.

One thing we notice with the juniors are the scores after a close first set. Lots of 6-4s, 7-5s followed by 6-1s and 6-0s. I get on the case of my adult clinic guys when I see such a score. Vice versa as well.

What about when you get blown away the first set, and come back and *win* the second set? Is that a sign of mental strength?

Or, a sign that your coach was on court with you, coaching you every step of the way? :)

sp00q
02-19-2009, 08:16 AM
Mental toughness is confidence. As Nastase once said: "Confidence, that is everything." From confidence comes patience and a state of relaxed concentration: your not going to to tremble even if it's 0-5 in the final set.

Sup2Dresq
02-19-2009, 08:20 AM
Mental toughness is confidence. As Nastase once said: "Confidence, that is everything." From confidence comes patience and a state of relaxed concentration: your not going to to tremble even if it's 0-5 in the final set.

Mental Toughness = confidence.

Interesting observation. Is an example of Agassi coming back to win the French Open final?

LuckyR
02-19-2009, 10:07 AM
Mental Toughness = confidence.

Interesting observation. Is an example of Agassi coming back to win the French Open final?

Not so much. Blind confidence in Plan A, when it is not working leads to a thrilling, rapid, loss. A craftier player (B Gilbert a good example) will try Plan B or even C and may win or lose, but probably has a better chance of actually winning than going down with the ship with your head held high.

Topaz
02-19-2009, 10:51 AM
Not so much. Blind confidence in Plan A, when it is not working leads to a thrilling, rapid, loss. A craftier player (B Gilbert a good example) will try Plan B or even C and may win or lose, but probably has a better chance of actually winning than going down with the ship with your head held high.

But I think confidence, in this case, meant more of confidence in yourself and your game and thinking 'okay, I know I can do this', and not doubting your ability...and your ability to put into play other game plans, if need be.

LuckyR
02-19-2009, 11:28 AM
I see your point, but I guess I would call that competitiveness (the unwillingness to buckle under even the most dire circumstances) rather than confidence (the belief that what you are doing is the right way to go).

maleyoyo
02-19-2009, 12:56 PM
Mental toughness on a tennis court is a combination of discipline, motivation, and problem-solving skills.
One must have discipline to stick with what he set out to do within his ability. One also must be motivated to give it enough effort to get it done.
Problem-solving skills are so critical because the winner of the match is usually the one who copes better than the opponent on any given day.

Sup2Dresq
02-19-2009, 01:16 PM
Not so much. Blind confidence in Plan A, when it is not working leads to a thrilling, rapid, loss. A craftier player (B Gilbert a good example) will try Plan B or even C and may win or lose, but probably has a better chance of actually winning than going down with the ship with your head held high.

So the opposite of Safin. LOL.

Hear that Shcmad?

All good replies people. Rather interesting talk.

ShcMad
02-19-2009, 04:10 PM
So the opposite of Safin. LOL.

Hear that Shcmad?

All good replies people. Rather interesting talk.

Ho hardy har har.

naylor
02-19-2009, 07:47 PM
I would more simply define mental toughness as the ability to sustain and / or elevate your level of play in pressure situations.

I would just add the ability to think throughout during the match, and also change your play by reference to the situation.

My partner and I played a very talented teenager paired with a team player yesterday. The youngster started with three aces in his opening game - a wide slider, a bomb down the middle and another slider. And when my partner managed to return his serve from the deuce side to a good depth, he simply drilled me down the trams (rather than the percentage cross-court back to my partner still at the back). So, we simply stood 4 feet inside the baseline to cut the angles and block the ball back - still some aces, but now double faults started coming also. And we also started returning short, to stop him from teeing off from the baseline (not a natural S&V doubles player) and forcing him to come forward and hit low balls upwards - shots started hitting the back fence. And we never dropped serve - but broke him twice and his partner once - so 64 63, thanks very much from the team with a combined age of 110!

Basically, we worked out quickly that on our serve games we would play for 1 or 3 stroke rallies, and on return games we'd try to get into longer rallies but also get in a position when we could play shorter balls and more angled shots, to take them away from the comfort of the baseline. And we got enough plays of both to get the result.

crystal_clear
02-19-2009, 08:35 PM
Mental toughness is the ability you can control your emotion and mentality in any circumstance and not controlled by emotion.

Sup2Dresq
02-20-2009, 03:59 AM
Not so much. Blind confidence in Plan A, when it is not working leads to a thrilling, rapid, loss. A craftier player (B Gilbert a good example) will try Plan B or even C and may win or lose, but probably has a better chance of actually winning than going down with the ship with your head held high.

Good response. I know of a person with blind confidence. Plays like plan A you mentioned and loses 80% plus of the time. Sad to see he won't play at his level and almost thinks 3.5 is too low for his 5.0 fantasy.

Sup2Dresq
02-20-2009, 04:02 AM
I would just add the ability to think throughout during the match, and also change your play by reference to the situation.

My partner and I played a very talented teenager paired with a team player yesterday. The youngster started with three aces in his opening game - a wide slider, a bomb down the middle and another slider. And when my partner managed to return his serve from the deuce side to a good depth, he simply drilled me down the trams (rather than the percentage cross-court back to my partner still at the back). So, we simply stood 4 feet inside the baseline to cut the angles and block the ball back - still some aces, but now double faults started coming also. And we also started returning short, to stop him from teeing off from the baseline (not a natural S&V doubles player) and forcing him to come forward and hit low balls upwards - shots started hitting the back fence. And we never dropped serve - but broke him twice and his partner once - so 64 63, thanks very much from the team with a combined age of 110!

Basically, we worked out quickly that on our serve games we would play for 1 or 3 stroke rallies, and on return games we'd try to get into longer rallies but also get in a position when we could play shorter balls and more angled shots, to take them away from the comfort of the baseline. And we got enough plays of both to get the result.

Nice post and congrats on the win. Remember your post for the next thread I'm about to start. Again congrats.

mikeler
02-20-2009, 11:22 AM
Nice post and congrats on the win. Remember your post for the next thread I'm about to start. Again congrats.


Is it going to be the "How To Beat A Talented Teenager" thread? :-)

Sup2Dresq
02-20-2009, 11:49 AM
Is it going to be the "How To Beat A Talented Teenager" thread? :-)

No, but that's an idea.

BTW, when you won did you mention the combine age of you and your partner. Maybe you two should get a t-shirt.

T-shirt: Would be a shame to lose to a team with a combined age of 110.

Maybe a lot to write on a shirt, but well worth it.

mikeler
02-20-2009, 01:02 PM
No, but that's an idea.

BTW, when you won did you mention the combine age of you and your partner. Maybe you two should get a t-shirt.

T-shirt: Would be a shame to lose to a team with a combined age of 110.

Maybe a lot to write on a shirt, but well worth it.


Please put a link in this thread to your new post when it is up as I'll be interested in checking it out. Thanks and have a good weekend.

naylor
02-20-2009, 01:17 PM
BTW, when you won did you mention the combine age of you and your partner

We didn't need to - we look it! But we're young at heart and play a reasonably athletic game so didn't want to make much of it (and they were some good-looking ladies watching too).

Sup2Dresq
02-26-2009, 07:13 AM
Vic Braden's book: Mental Tennis has 4 good points that may help define Mental Toughness. Well maybe.

He wrore the 4 concepts of mental tennis are:

1- Mind body connections.
2- Psychological states, moods, affects, feelings, and problems all dramatically impinge on your game.
3- "Mental" implies "smart" and "intelligent" tennis
4- "Mental" also implies strategies.

Sup2Dresq
02-26-2009, 07:15 AM
We didn't need to - we look it! But we're young at heart and play a reasonably athletic game so didn't want to make much of it (and they were some good-looking ladies watching too).

How about a shirt with these two characters and the words: Shame to lose to the likes of us. Talk about mental warfare.

http://carpefactum.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/09/29/muppet_statler_waldorf.jpg

LuckyR
02-26-2009, 09:04 AM
Good response. I know of a person with blind confidence. Plays like plan A you mentioned and loses 80% plus of the time. Sad to see he won't play at his level and almost thinks 3.5 is too low for his 5.0 fantasy.

The early rounds of tournaments are littered with the remnants of folks like that...

cl76
02-26-2009, 12:52 PM
Mental toughness is the ability to control your emotions.

Xisbum
02-26-2009, 03:30 PM
Posting late, and I can only speak for myself. Para mi, mental toughness kicks in on every single point - Make. One. More. Shot.

Works for me.

ShooterMcMarco
02-26-2009, 10:57 PM
For me, mental toughness boils down to this:

Outcome independence.

When you don't care if you win or lose, you tend to relax...when you're relaxed, you think more clearly in terms of strategy and you also hit out on your shots. Mental toughness is the ability to be consistently outcome independent.