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View Full Version : A little Instruction help?


pfchang
03-02-2009, 08:20 PM
I guess this may kinda fit here, as i'm not getting to many responses in the tips and instructions forum, and I got burned by a poster already there.

So I kinda am an appointed instructor at my club now, and i'm supposed to be taking care of beginner-intermediate range kids now.

I really have very little idea of how to begin teaching them, or what exercises to do.

I only remember skyball and like around the world games, and very few stroke developing exercises that do not involve the racket.

These kids range from 13-16 years old I think.

Any good suggestions? I would greatly appreciate your comments!

saram
03-02-2009, 09:05 PM
One thing you want to do is not lose their attention. Never continue a drill long enough where you lose their attention. You have to make it fun for them.

You also have to realize that not all of them are there for themselves--some are there only for their parents.

As far as drills and such, just make it fun at first. Keep them interested, even ask what they want to do and take it from there.

Keep them busy. Keep them entertained. Keep them interested. Don't go into point/shot construction or anything too in depth at first. Find out who is interested in taking their game further and work with them in private lessons.

In group lessons with kids, I have found that keeping them busy and involved is the core of giving lessons in the beginning.

pfchang
03-02-2009, 10:00 PM
One thing you want to do is not lose their attention. Never continue a drill long enough where you lose their attention. You have to make it fun for them.

You also have to realize that not all of them are there for themselves--some are there only for their parents.

As far as drills and such, just make it fun at first. Keep them interested, even ask what they want to do and take it from there.

Keep them busy. Keep them entertained. Keep them interested. Don't go into point/shot construction or anything too in depth at first. Find out who is interested in taking their game further and work with them in private lessons.

In group lessons with kids, I have found that keeping them busy and involved is the core of giving lessons in the beginning.

Ok, that actually helps. I really wanted to help each and everyone of them, but i guess some are just not interested in getting further on.

Thanks a lot, Saram.

Also, for the kids who do seem a bit more serious, what i should i start out with? I have a very general idea of what, like some games i know, but I would also like to help out their begining strokes. I can handle some kids who have intermediate experience just fine, but my beginner years were a LONG time ago...

maverick66
03-02-2009, 10:14 PM
just let them have fun. 13-16 and just beginners you can help there strokes but if there not taking it serious let them have fun. do some drills but mostly keep them moving and playing games. do things that keeps everyone involved. dont let them stand and wait cause there gonna start quitting if you do.

saram
03-02-2009, 10:20 PM
Ok, that actually helps. I really wanted to help each and everyone of them, but i guess some are just not interested in getting further on.

Thanks a lot, Saram.

Also, for the kids who do seem a bit more serious, what i should i start out with? I have a very general idea of what, like some games i know, but I would also like to help out their begining strokes. I can handle some kids who have intermediate experience just fine, but my beginner years were a LONG time ago...

Just about every person new to tennis needs consistency. So, hit with them for ten minutes. See their patterns. Don't teach them the Fed forehand instantly. I have found over and over that footwork and preparation will help tons. Just talk about recovering to the center of the court, anticipation of forehand, backhand, etc. Kids are so lazy these days.

For those that are serious--truly ask them what they want out of their lessons. Their parents will tell you one thing--but you are coaching the child. Ask them what they want, what they lack, and what they would like to improve on. If the kid thinks you are listening to them and helping them--they will work with you.

Too many kids are pressured by their parents. Don't listen to what the parent 'thinks' should happen. Listen to and analyze the kid you are teaching. If you become a friend of the kid and listen to them--they may respect and react to you more than their parent.