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View Full Version : Hating my USTA experience


albino smurf
03-20-2009, 05:45 PM
I've got to say that so far the matches have been scheduled at terrible times and their seems to be a culture of cheating built in to it. When in doubt call it out is what I keep hearing and I'm of the mindset that I give the other player the benefit of the doubt if I'm not certain. I have so much better of a time in unsanctioned matches. I also do not care for the team format and the pressure that comes with it. The thing I've always enjoyed most about tennis is that it is me against whoever, and me alone. Maybe I'm just not a good fit for the USTA. Anybody else go through this when they started and figured out a way to enjoy it more?

Majik
03-20-2009, 06:05 PM
I've got to say that so far the matches have been scheduled at terrible times and their seems to be a culture of cheating built in to it. When in doubt call it out is what I keep hearing and I'm of the mindset that I give the other player the benefit of the doubt if I'm not certain. I have so much better of a time in unsanctioned matches. I also do not care for the team format and the pressure that comes with it. The thing I've always enjoyed most about tennis is that it is me against whoever, and me alone. Maybe I'm just not a good fit for the USTA. Anybody else go through this when they started and figured out a way to enjoy it more?

Yes, my whole first term was nothing but losses, and many times against those I should normally be able to beat. You need to learn how to relax and play like you practice. That's the only way you're ever going to have fun with it.

saram
03-20-2009, 06:52 PM
Yes, my whole first term was nothing but losses, and many times against those I should normally be able to beat. You need to learn how to relax and play like you practice. That's the only way you're ever going to have fun with it.

Why do you need to practice? You are a 3.0 with 100mph forehands and 120mph serves for cryin' out loud. YOU ARE THE BOMB!!!!!

TenniseaWilliams
03-20-2009, 07:45 PM
Cheer up, the only thing worse than playing the adult leagues is ... not playing.

The inconvenience never goes away, rush hour cross town matches canceled by thunderstorms. (unless half the team doesn't show) If your pain threshold goes up enough, you could always be a captain.

I try to concentrate on the social aspects, good hitting partners are valuable and scarce.

I like the new avatar.

cak
03-20-2009, 11:18 PM
I also do not care for the team format and the pressure that comes with it. The thing I've always enjoyed most about tennis is that it is me against whoever, and me alone.

I really like the whole team concept, and don't play competitively if it's just me against whomever. And I like the social aspect of one for all and all for one. That's why I like team play. But if you don't there are flex leagues (where you set up the matches at a convenient time for both parties) and tournaments. They may be much more of the type of tennis you are comfortable with.

Dorfs
03-20-2009, 11:56 PM
Maybe I'm just not a good fit for the USTA. Anybody else go through this when they started and figured out a way to enjoy it more?

You first have to realize, that even when competing you are playing a game.Games should make fun.Just take it positive.You are a good fit for the USTA.Why shouldn't you be???If you take it that bad playing USTA you never will have fun.You have ONLY to see the positive things.Forget that bad ****.The timetable is bad.But it is as bad for you as it is for the guy you play.
I don't think you play because you want to win, you play because you decided, that tennis is something fun YOU WANT to do.
About the positive stuff: You can play USTA (not everbody can.)
You can play with new guys.You can show what you learned in practice.You can get better while playing.You can find your game-style better.You can make new friends.
But the best thing is: You can have fun.
Put up the positive side of the coin you have and put down the negative side, because if not it will **** you off.

Godd luck m8

albino smurf
03-21-2009, 07:11 AM
Good advice all. Thanks.

gould2000
03-21-2009, 09:40 AM
Re:

"When in doubt call it out is what I keep hearing and I'm of the mindset that I give the other player the benefit of the doubt if I'm not certain."

I agree with you 100%. In my area, people are pretty good about giving the opponent the benefit of the doubt in un-officiated matches. #8 of the USTA "the code" basically says says, if your not sure, call the ball good. Sounds like the people in your league need to be reminded of that.

http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/sitecore_usta/USTA/Document%20Assets/2008/05/29/doc_13_22409.pdf

Don't get down. As you get more comfortable with the pressure, you'll enjoy the wins that much more.

bad_call
03-21-2009, 09:59 AM
suggest you become acquainted with those you meet who could potentially be a practice partner outside the league.

saram
03-21-2009, 10:42 AM
Cheer up, the only thing worse than playing the adult leagues is ... not playing.



Well said!

Topaz
03-21-2009, 11:42 AM
Ugh, sorry to hear you aren't having a positive first experience.

In my time with USTA, I have found that yes...the match times are inconvenient because the indoor clubs are only going to rent the courts to the USTA during the 'down' times, which means either really early or really late.

Fortunately, we have outdoor USTA options here as well.

Also, flex leagues were mentioned...we are getting that in my area for the first time soon, and I'm excited about it! That may be something that would be more enjoyable for you, as well.

And, yes, even here, USTA line calling has a bad reputation. I like having an actual copy of The Code lying visible, maybe next to my bag, if I know I'm coming up against someone of dubious line calling abilities. You can always do the same back to them, but that has always been hard for me to do, because that isn't how I learned how to call lines. The best way to deal with those people...beat them.

Also, for me, my experiences varied greatly depending on my team captain and other members, and sometimes my own members (when I was captaining). It might take a while for you to find a good fit as far as that goes.

tyro
03-21-2009, 11:43 AM
I think it takes a season to adjust to league tennis and the mostly self-imposed pressure of playing for a team.

In my first season, I joined a team that expected to be a strong contender for the league title. Before every match, the captain's injunction was, "Let's take all five courts."

Maybe he was just trying to pump us up, but I didn't need that kind of pressure. I didn't play well at all. The following season, I joined a weak team, built on the few lessons I'd learned in the previous season, and started to put together a few wins. Within two years, our weak team developed enough to make it to the districts, where we lost to the team that wound up representing our section in Nationals.

So, I think it's a combination of getting used to the league format and finding a team that suits your personality. At some point, it will be fun!

--Tyro

netman
03-22-2009, 06:26 PM
Find a team that is in sync with your goals. Want to have fun, get out of the house for 2-4 hours and hang out wth some fun folks? Then find a team that is focused on that goal. Want to crush your opponents and contend for a national championship? Then find that type of team and do what ever it takes to make the starting rotation.

Never forget you are not getting paid to play. So you are in control of the outcome. 25 years of USTA competition has taught me its much more fun to hang out with a bunch of folks you enjoy tossing back a cold one with and striving for a title, than playing on a team that will do whatever it takes to win a title.

BTW, you pretty much have to cheat the ranking system to win a national title, so check your morals at the door if you choose that path. If you think you are 4.0, self-rate at 3.0 and make the best of your one season at 3.0.

skiracer55
03-23-2009, 12:35 PM
I've got to say that so far the matches have been scheduled at terrible times and their seems to be a culture of cheating built in to it. When in doubt call it out is what I keep hearing and I'm of the mindset that I give the other player the benefit of the doubt if I'm not certain. I have so much better of a time in unsanctioned matches. I also do not care for the team format and the pressure that comes with it. The thing I've always enjoyed most about tennis is that it is me against whoever, and me alone. Maybe I'm just not a good fit for the USTA. Anybody else go through this when they started and figured out a way to enjoy it more?

...Boomer edition. I'm assuming you're talking about USTA Leagues, and I don't think you're gonna find any way to enjoy that experience. I'd rather lie out on the highway and let big trucks roll over me than play in a USTA league. USTA tournaments are a different story, at least if you stay away from the NTRP events. I play Men's Open and age class events only, and I've uniformly found that I play fun, competitive, high level tennis against tough competitors who are also thorough sportsmen. So, yep, there is life after USTA Leagues...

mdthsv
03-23-2009, 05:43 PM
...Boomer edition. I'm assuming you're talking about USTA Leagues, and I don't think you're gonna find any way to enjoy that experience. I'd rather lie out on the highway and let big trucks roll over me than play in a USTA league. USTA tournaments are a different story, at least if you stay away from the NTRP events. I play Men's Open and age class events only, and I've uniformly found that I play fun, competitive, high level tennis against tough competitors who are also thorough sportsmen. So, yep, there is life after USTA Leagues...

Our league is comprised, by and large, of honest, good-intentioned players. There have been two instances in two full years of USTA play in which I observed an opponent utilizing the "when in doubt, call it out" strategy. That being said, I make every effort to eliminate line calls in those matches and hit a few statement shots in the direction of the offending player or their partner. That usually sends a message to the offender and might prompt their partner to be a little more assertive in challenging their partner on questionable calls.

ttbrowne
03-23-2009, 05:45 PM
USTA sucks because the weather here sucks. Hate the outdoor, misting rain, windy, cold crap.

But just this weekend, a team we were playing didn't see my partners forhand that hit the line. They asked me, I said yes it was in. They got ****ed and later called one of his line shots out. Cheap!