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View Full Version : Rule about the netplayer in doubles


Ruud
03-27-2009, 05:00 AM
I was playing doubles against some friends. When one of them was serving the man that was standing at the net positioned himself at the same side as the server. So when he was serving from the right at 40 - 40 the man at the net was also standing on the right site of the court at the net. Is this legal?

I hope it is al little bit clear.

PS i had no problems with this (it was just for fun) otherwise i woud have smacked him wright between the eyes hahaha.

spt
03-27-2009, 05:16 AM
yes it is legal - it even has a name. It is called Australian doubles because it was formation popularized by, you guessed it - the Australians. Some of the top teams play this occasionally.

Atown
03-27-2009, 06:55 AM
Is this legal?

Yes, it is legal; see Rule 26, Case 5:

Case 5: In doubles, where are the serverís partner and receiverís partner allowed to stand?

Decision: The serverís partner and the receiverís partner may take any position on their own side of the net, inside or outside the court. However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used.

Ruud
03-27-2009, 09:01 AM
Thanks, i knew about the australian formation but i did not know that is was legal to totally stand on same side as the server.

But now it is clear thanks.

blakesq
03-27-2009, 09:47 AM
What does "However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used" actually mean? For instance, if you are playing the standard Australian Doubles position, and the opponents claim its hindering them, can they make you move to the standard doubles position?

And, if that is the case, what if opponents claim that the net man on the serving side is standing too close to the net, can they claim a hinderance on that, and make the net man move back to where they feel "unhindered'?


Yes, it is legal; see Rule 26, Case 5:

Case 5: In doubles, where are the server’s partner and receiver’s partner allowed to stand?

Decision: The server’s partner and the receiver’s partner may take any position on their own side of the net, inside or outside the court. However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used.

woodrow1029
03-27-2009, 09:52 AM
What does "However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used" actually mean? For instance, if you are playing the standard Australian Doubles position, and the opponents claim its hindering them, can they make you move to the standard doubles position?

And, if that is the case, what if opponents claim that the net man on the serving side is standing too close to the net, can they claim a hinderance on that, and make the net man move back to where they feel "unhindered'?
In this case, hindrance would refer to something like the net man waving his arms up in the air, or jumping up and down. Something deliberately done for the sole purpose of distracting the opponent.

Some people will say that just standing there is done to distract the opponent, however the phrasing of the server and receiver's partner may take any position on their side of the net takes that argument away.

Geezer Guy
03-27-2009, 09:59 AM
What does "However, if a player is creating a hindrance to the opponent(s), the hindrance rule should be used" actually mean? For instance, if you are playing the standard Australian Doubles position, and the opponents claim its hindering them, can they make you move to the standard doubles position?

And, if that is the case, what if opponents claim that the net man on the serving side is standing too close to the net, can they claim a hinderance on that, and make the net man move back to where they feel "unhindered'?

Good point. And what if the server is serving too hard? Call a hinderance on that as well.

Geezer Guy
03-27-2009, 10:01 AM
... however the phrasing of the server and receiver's partner may take any position on their side of the net takes that argument away.

The servers partner, the returner, and the returners partner can ALL stand ANYWHERE on their side of the net that they want to.
The server is the only one that has a defined area from which he must start the point. (I know YOU know that - just trying to make it abundantly clear.)

jefferson
04-03-2009, 04:31 PM
This is totally legal. No hinderance...
Sounds like the line is wide open.

tennisdad65
04-08-2009, 01:58 PM
The servers partner, the returner, and the returners partner can ALL stand ANYWHERE on their side of the net that they want to.

I am trying to visualize the situation where the returners partner stands on the opposite court within the service line :)

i.e. directly in the path of the serve. That would be distracting to the returner and put himself at injury risk, but could be very distracting to the server too..

Geezer Guy
04-08-2009, 02:41 PM
I don't think it would really be that distracting to most "seasoned" players.
They'ed probably just aim their serve at the guy standing in the box.

spot
04-09-2009, 02:38 PM
In a mixed doubles match earlier this season when the woman was serving from the deuce side her partner was standing to her right. It was australian but with both players at the baseline. I couldn't believe it and it had us cracking up. The guy they were serving to had a WICKED crosscourt return that the girl had no chance at. The guy had no chance at it while he was at the net either. So he came back to the baseline. Of course they still had no chance- there was too much of the court open, the girls serve just wasn't strong enough to give the guy they were playing any problems but I actually thought it was sort of creative and I doubt it would have ever crossed my mind.