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View Full Version : How often do pros switch out their frames??


fps
04-06-2009, 01:35 PM
Hey,
I know the likes of Safin have always used PC600s with various paintjobs over. Over time, these rackets must lose at least some of their vibrancy, so how often does a guy go back to the well and replace his rackets with fresh, if identical, frames? How is this done with older, rarer rackets?
I've not done a search, if there's already a topic like this, still I'd like to hear from newer posters too if they can give me some information.

OliverSimon
04-06-2009, 02:36 PM
I was also wondering that and I have no idea :)

fps
04-07-2009, 08:09 AM
bump.

over time, frames surely go bad. how do top pros deal with this, and where do they get their replacements for out-of-production frames from?

racketcollector
04-07-2009, 08:29 AM
There are always reps from the various racket companies traveling the tour. The grand slams are a sure bet for receiving new sticks. Different players have different contracts as well. Some may get a "set amount" of frames, others may be unlimited. Some may have them delivered to their agent; some to their racket technician who will then customize them and have them ready for pickup at the next tourney. Some may have delivered to their home. The amount and frequency of replacement varies. As far as grommet replacement goes, its probably up to the sales rep on the tour to help them out. If not, a good technician is probably helping those guys. If that's not possible, the stringer has to be inventive with tubing etc to get the job done.

Rabbit
04-07-2009, 09:20 AM
Tennis magazine had an article some years ago. They said that a professional player usually wears a frame out in 6 months.

For 4.5s and above, the average life was 5 years or so. And 3.0 and below would never need a new frame.

babolatboy12
04-08-2009, 06:45 PM
yes i agree that pros switch out at the most every 6 months. tiny bits of graphite tend to break off from the vibration and especially shanks. and as it wears on, it loses its stiffness and becomes a bit more flexible.

J011yroger
04-08-2009, 06:49 PM
Tennis magazine had an article some years ago. They said that a professional player usually wears a frame out in 6 months.

In a rotation of 6-12 frames that is.

J

Sovereignty
04-08-2009, 07:21 PM
But how do you tell when a frame is dead? Is it obvious, or just knowledge.

miniRafa386
04-08-2009, 07:34 PM
But how do you tell when a frame is dead? Is it obvious, or just knowledge.

if you take a new frame and a used frame of the same model, the used frame would feel more "mushy" and flexible, while the new one would be "crisp" and stiffer.

nadal for number1
04-08-2009, 07:38 PM
i guess you feel the difference right?
you can totally tell, get two of the same rackets, a new one and an old one, theyll feel diff. in some way

Fedace
04-08-2009, 07:48 PM
I try to switch out the frame once a year or so. the ones i use most often, of course. i can tell some loss in control and power after a year.

DjordjeRosic
04-08-2009, 08:16 PM
Most companies keep molds from previous rackets and just add the current paintjob they are endorsing a player for, I know the Head has all their old molds, and still produces 50,000 frames a year for all contracted players that are ranked and im not quite sure but some high up college players, like i said they just add the new paint to them when they are freshly made and ship them out.

-Djordje

Rabbit
04-09-2009, 05:44 AM
I don't really think anyone with an NTRP rating is ever going to wear a frame out....well maybe if you played the same frame for 10 years....

I'm stringing for a WTA Satellite event this week. There is one girl who plays with Nads' racquet, the Babolat AeroPro Drive, and fellas......she goes through two racquets every day. I figure she gets an hour to an hour and a half out of a frame.

I don't know how many frames she has and don't think it's germane to this discussion anyway. I say this because for sure one I strung last night was a repeat, I could tell by the knots. The second one I strung for her is the one of interest though. It had been strung so many times that the paint had worn off where it is tied off. In other words, when the stringiner used the tensioner to pull tension on the knot, it had been done so many times, that the paint had worn off in the spot where the string was pulled against the frame.

Now take into account the following variables. Depending on how the frame was strung, the last cross tie off could have occurred in one of four spots since the frame could be strung up or down, left or right. Still there was enough activity on the frame to wear paint off in all four spots...and still she's swinging away with the frame.

I don't think any of us need to worry about swapping frames any time soon.

tennisdad65
04-09-2009, 09:22 AM
tiny bits of graphite tend to break off from the vibration and especially shanks. and as it wears on, it loses its stiffness and becomes a bit more flexible.

the used frame would feel more "mushy" and flexible, while the new one would be "crisp" and stiffer.

so a used racquet is more flexible and better for the arm / Tennis elbow?

J011yroger
04-09-2009, 02:49 PM
so a used racquet is more flexible and better for the arm / Tennis elbow?

Not really, they break in, and play the same for a while, and then when they flex out, they tend to go downhill pretty quickly.

I guess if you took someone like me, and had a frame that I said was flexxed out, but before it broke, and you gave it to a light hitting never break a string kind of guy, he could play it for a long time with the softer feeling.

But they start to feel soft, and then shortly thereafter they just take a dump, and you can feel the frame wobble too much, and it feels like it is going to snap in half every time you lay into a FH.

J

christo
04-09-2009, 02:53 PM
maybe Sampras will give away his old worn out St.Vincent's now he's found his new "holy grail" the K88, LOL