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CityHeightsTennis
04-09-2009, 12:26 AM
To clarify the question, if you play tennis (not just High School tennis) such as USTA tournaments and you hold a solid rank (USTA and tennisrecruiting.net), but not high enough to be recruited into colleges, do
you have a better chance of getting admitted into colleges than who just played JV or Varsity HS tennis w/o USTA?

Or if you are not good enough to be recruited, you basically have the same resume like the ones who just play JV or Varsity High School tennis?

Many of my friends and I are wondering about this question...any help would be really appreciated. Thank you. :)

eeytennis
04-09-2009, 06:40 AM
To clarify the question, if you play tennis (not just High School tennis) such as USTA tournaments and you hold a solid rank (USTA and tennisrecruiting.net), but not high enough to be recruited into colleges, do
you have a better chance of getting admitted into colleges than who just played JV or Varsity HS tennis w/o USTA?

Or if you are not good enough to be recruited, you basically have the same resume like the ones who just play JV or Varsity High School tennis?

Many of my friends and I are wondering about this question...any help would be really appreciated. Thank you. :)

It really depends on the type of school you are going to...if you are a solid player who has a USTA ranking and/or a tennisrecruiting.net rating then there will definitely some D3 schools that would want you. However, if you are looking to get into Stanford, for example, and are not one the best juniors in the USA, then none of your tennis credentials will help get you into the school if the coach is not interested with you. If a D1 coach does have interest in you and wants you to play on the team, then you will sign with that school in the fall and are basically guaranteed a spot into the school. For D3, you can contact the coach and if they are interested, they will often contact the Admissions office and let them know that you are a recruit, and yes, that does give you some pull but doesn't necessarily guarantee you a spot...yet. Also, D3 schools can offer academic study halls of a sort for those who wouldn't normally get in under the average admission standards, but have been accepted because of the sport they play.

Again, like I have reiterated before, contact the coaches of the schools you are interested in, they can give you all the information needed for that specific school.

eagle
04-09-2009, 07:31 AM
contact the coaches of the schools you are interested in, they can give you all the information needed for that specific school.

Unless a college tennis coach is here to see this and respond, the advice above is your best course of action. All others will simply be opinions and conjectures.

r,
eagle

charliefedererer
04-09-2009, 08:50 AM
Does tennis help towards admission in college?

Maybe a little, but not much, unless you are intent at getting into a smaller school that definitely is looking to get you on their team. Take the above advise and start contacting any prospective shools now, to get an idea of how good a tennis player you will need to be to get recruited.
Admissions are done by admission officers whose job it is to first screen and make sure you can handle the acedemic rigors or their college, based on your scholastic record and achievement tests.
They will look to fill their athletic teams and orchestras with recruited athletes and musicians, but if you are not one of these, your tennis achievement may not resonate with an admissions officer who is unaware of how hard you have worked on your tennis game. They would more likely be impressed if you had demonstrated a level of achievement in an are you are going to major in (like the prospective engineer who was on the math and science teams, and who worked/volunteered on a community project to install solar panels on school and government office buildings.) Or that you would round out their student body by being interested in student government, and had volunteered in a political campaign.
That's not to say that for you as an individual, tennis won't have been a useful area for you to have participated in. It takes discipline and work to be successful in tennis, and this will help you later in life. Also tennis is a potentially lifelong activity that can be enjoyed, help relieve stress, and be a powerful motivator to stay in shape.
Now go and talk to your guidance councilor for further advice.

CityHeightsTennis
04-09-2009, 11:15 AM
It really depends on the type of school you are going to...if you are a solid player who has a USTA ranking and/or a tennisrecruiting.net rating then there will definitely some D3 schools that would want you. However, if you are looking to get into Stanford, for example, and are not one the best juniors in the USA, then none of your tennis credentials will help get you into the school if the coach is not interested with you. If a D1 coach does have interest in you and wants you to play on the team, then you will sign with that school in the fall and are basically guaranteed a spot into the school. For D3, you can contact the coach and if they are interested, they will often contact the Admissions office and let them know that you are a recruit, and yes, that does give you some pull but doesn't necessarily guarantee you a spot...yet. Also, D3 schools can offer academic study halls of a sort for those who wouldn't normally get in under the average admission standards, but have been accepted because of the sport they play.

Again, like I have reiterated before, contact the coaches of the schools you are interested in, they can give you all the information needed for that specific school.

thanks for the great advice. :)

CityHeightsTennis
04-09-2009, 11:24 AM
Does tennis help towards admission in college?

Maybe a little, but not much, unless you are intent at getting into a smaller school that definitely is looking to get you on their team. Take the above advise and start contacting any prospective shools now, to get an idea of how good a tennis player you will need to be to get recruited.
Admissions are done by admission officers whose job it is to first screen and make sure you can handle the acedemic rigors or their college, based on your scholastic record and achievement tests.
They will look to fill their athletic teams and orchestras with recruited athletes and musicians, but if you are not one of these, your tennis achievement may not resonate with an admissions officer who is unaware of how hard you have worked on your tennis game. They would more likely be impressed if you had demonstrated a level of achievement in an are you are going to major in (like the prospective engineer who was on the math and science teams, and who worked/volunteered on a community project to install solar panels on school and government office buildings.) Or that you would round out their student body by being interested in student government, and had volunteered in a political campaign.
That's not to say that for you as an individual, tennis won't have been a useful area for you to have participated in. It takes discipline and work to be successful in tennis, and this will help you later in life. Also tennis is a potentially lifelong activity that can be enjoyed, help relieve stress, and be a powerful motivator to stay in shape.
Now go and talk to your guidance councilor for further advice.

thanks for the great advice. :)

Fedace
04-09-2009, 04:15 PM
If you are trying to get into D1 Ivy league type of schools like Stanford or Harvard, You have to have both grades and tennis talent. Lets say you are one of the top 30 Juniors in the nation, and the coach really wants you on the team. But you only have C average in High school, it will be nearly impossible for the coach to convince the admission office, to give you a pass.
So it really depends on the University. If you are one of the top Juniors and want to play for USC for instance, in that case, the grades probably aren't as important. Not that i am putting down USC here, but i am just using it as a example.

jaggy
04-09-2009, 06:41 PM
The Ivys turn away lots of 4.0 students so if you are a 4.0 and have a real shot at making their team it would help.

cdbell
04-09-2009, 07:20 PM
I completely agree with eeytennis. I played D1 tennis for 4 years in undergrad, and last year I was an assistant coach for a D1 team during my final year of grad school.

From what I saw, unless the tennis coach actually picks up the phone and calls the admissions director about a particular applicant he has recruited, admissions isn't going to give much weight to your tennis record. In other words, I don't think you'd get extra points for being almost good enough to be on the team (no offense).

a_2c+
04-13-2009, 07:23 PM
BUMP: don't know if it is off topic, but, here's my input on what you can try, if it's possible (i still go to high school, so i don't know if my theory is credible...)

Go to college of your choice based on academic achievement. ONce you get into that college, play strong club tennis or something. Maybe after a year of so, try to convince coach to let you in as a walk on.

or, if that advice does not sound feasible, you can chuck it altogether. :-p

charliefedererer
04-15-2009, 08:17 AM
CityHeightsTennis,
The following is an exchange I just had with a high school coach looking for used racquets to benefit his community. I don't know if you are in any position to do something like this for an area near you. But if you could, it would be a something likely to impress an admissions officer, learn from an experience, and help others.

Tennis Balls/Racquets

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm a high school tennis coach in Southern California (about 2 hours east of San Diego), and am looking to purchase tennis balls (used or new) or used racquets for our program.

Our students tend to come from a lower socio-economic background, so our budget is limited.

We're always trying to find the best deals on tennis balls and racquets that we can find.

Anyone here know of places to find good deals on tennis balls/racquets, or perhaps have tennis balls/racquets that you are willing to donate/sell at a reasonable price?

Any help is appreciated.

Please email me at clxtennis@hotmail.com

Thank you.

Thanks,

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I've noticed in the "College Tennis Talk" section that young players often wonder whether tennis will help get them into a better college. My guess is that most admissions officers would be more impressed with someone organizing a used racquet drive in their community than in just joining some volunteer club or playing second doubles for their high school team. Even if they they have a high junior USTA ranking, such an endeavor would be a good one to be involved in. Organizing a used racquet drive would demonstrate real industry and initiative, identifying them as a problem solver concerned about others. How about posting in the College Tennis Talk section to see if you have any takers?

paws26
05-01-2009, 06:36 AM
You didn't state the type of college you were trying to get into - Div I, II, or III, but I would say 'yes' playing high school varsity & USTA will help. Assuming you're not trying to get into the top Ivy's or other top schools, which even superstars have trouble getting into, this is why it should help. If you want to play at a Div III school I'll tell you what I did.

You will have to fill out an application for college that will include many questions including accomplishments, interests and an essay. You can stress your ongoing commitment to the sport and how it helped you be a better student by giving you discipline, teamwork skills etc. USTA experience is invaluable for facing pressure and competition. Did you win any USTA sportmanship awards or high school awards? MVP or most improved? All of those accomplisments will be noted. You need to tie that back to how it has helped you succeed in school. You can list your coach as a reference, and you will also need letters of recommendation - again perhaps from your coach.

I wanted to continue playing tennis and knew Div I & II schools were out of my reach. Once I narrowed it down to the schools I was interested in I put to together a package of my high school & USTA tennis accomplishments, including video, and sent it to the tennis coaches. I also filled out the online recruiting form for the schools I was interested in on their school website. I then visited the schools, requesting a meeting with the tennis coach, in addition to the normal tour, and admission officer talks. I even practiced with the teams so the coach could check me out. I applied to 7 schools, div I through III, got into 6, got interest from 3 of the Div III tennis coaches, and am now playing college tennis at a private div III school. We just wrapped up our season and I couldn't be happier.

I also got a large scholarship which wasn't warranted by my grades, so I do think the tennis coach intervened to get me an academic scholarship. So, I say, yes, playing high school & USTA tennis can help with college admissions, even if you aren't the top player in the country.

paws26
05-01-2009, 06:37 AM
You didn't state the type of college you were trying to get into - Div I, II, or III, but I would say 'yes' playing high school varsity & USTA will help. Assuming you're not trying to get into the top Ivy's or other top schools, which even superstars have trouble getting into, this is why it should help. If you want to play at a Div III school I'll tell you what I did.

You will have to fill out an application for college that will include many questions including accomplishments, interests and an essay. You can stress your ongoing commitment to the sport and how it helped you be a better student by giving you discipline, teamwork skills etc. USTA experience is invaluable for facing pressure and competition. Did you win any USTA sportmanship awards or high school awards? MVP or most improved? All of those accomplisments will be noted. You need to tie that back to how it has helped you succeed in school. You can list your coach as a reference, and you will also need letters of recommendation - again perhaps from your coach.

I wanted to continue playing tennis and knew Div I & II schools were out of my reach. Once I narrowed it down to the schools I was interested in I put to together a package of my high school & USTA tennis accomplishments, including video, and sent it to the tennis coaches. I also filled out the online recruiting form for the schools I was interested in on their school website. I then visited the schools, requesting a meeting with the tennis coach, in addition to the normal tour, and admission officer talks. I even practiced with the teams so the coach could check me out. I applied to 7 schools, div I through III, got into 6, got interest from 3 of the Div III tennis coaches, and am now playing college tennis at a private div III school. We just wrapped up our season and I couldn't be happier.

I also got a large scholarship which wasn't warranted by my grades, so I do think the tennis coach intervened to get me an academic scholarship. So, I say, yes, playing high school & USTA tennis can help with college admissions, even if you aren't the top player in the country.