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Blask
04-26-2009, 03:40 PM
When playing a USTA doubles match and an opponent is clearly headhunting during the match, do you say something? By head hunting, I mean trying to nail the ball on every sitter or short return of serve directly at the net man. I'm not talking about going down the line or hitting a tough ball at someone's feet, I mean deliberately taking aim at someone's head.

This happened in my match today and was curious how most people handle it. I know the easy response is to prepare yourself for it, get out of the way, or have better communication with your partner , but still going to ask the question.

maverick66
04-26-2009, 03:44 PM
return the favor. they will get the message. most guys ive played with that hh in tournies are wanna be tough guys. they are the first ones to complain when it comes back at them. its one thing to joke around with friends and hit balls at each other but you never go for a head.

autumn_leaf
04-26-2009, 04:16 PM
^^ agreed. i tend to be a vengeful guy in this situation. get a clean shot and take it.

i have to say playing like this and playing people that hh takes the fun out of the game major..

Blask
04-26-2009, 04:20 PM
Well, to finish the story, I didn't retaliate. At one point the guy literally knocked the hat off my head. I really wanted to jump over the net and pound the guy in the to the court but contained myself. The only think I really did was on one of his head shots i got a clean winner volley and told him to keep bringing it, I wasn't intimidated

We ended up losing in a 3rd set tiebreaker so that makes it harder to swallow.

TenS_Ace
04-26-2009, 09:23 PM
When playing a USTA doubles match and an opponent is clearly headhunting during the match, do you say something? By head hunting, I mean trying to nail the ball on every sitter or short return of serve directly at the net man. I'm not talking about going down the line or hitting a tough ball at someone's feet, I mean deliberately taking aim at someone's head.

This happened in my match today and was curious how most people handle it. I know the easy response is to prepare yourself for it, get out of the way, or have better communication with your partner , but still going to ask the question.
Couple things, if you are at the net and this dude tee's up a groundy that will hit you in the head...that ball should be sailing way long..so just duck! Second, time to have a chat with your partner for allowing crappy shots to get eaten up by the other team. If poor/short returns are a norm from your partner, it is best to play 2 back on the baseline when receiving the serve, that way you won't be a target. Why should the other team "try" to make the shot more difficult by aiming away from you? I'm not condoning(sp) head hunting, I'm just sayin'

nickynu
04-27-2009, 03:52 AM
I like to volley it for a winner, just a thought!

WBF
04-27-2009, 04:00 AM
key their car discreetly. Walk by when you notice them coming into view of the damage. Smile and wave.

origmarm
04-27-2009, 04:06 AM
I'd love to play an opponent like this, those are probably the most volleyable shots in the world. The worst is the "crotch hunter" :)....same thing but very difficult to volley.

Rickson
04-27-2009, 06:24 AM
HH is very bad form and it would probably be best not to play the hh in the future.

raiden031
04-27-2009, 06:54 AM
I've never played someone who I'd classify as a headhunter. Worst I've seen is in mixed when they hit every shot to my partner at the net, but it wasn't to take her head off. Anyways obviously its within the rules of the game so I don't know if you can really say anything about it.

I don't condone playing two back when you are the serving team unless you are so outclassed by your opponents, but then why would you play such a mismatched doubles match? Worst case should be that when your partner is serving, you start deeper in the service box so you have more time to react to the head-hunting return. I've never played someone where they could take my head off while I am on the service line. If you're 3 feet from the net and your opponent is returning from the service line, then you are a bit vulnerable, so thats why you wait it out before closing the net against this type of returner when your partner is not hitting good enough shots to keep them at bay.

Cindysphinx
04-27-2009, 08:31 AM
Raiden, I was playing yesterday with a lady who struggles with her serve. She was serving helium balloons yesterday. The problem wasn't that they were going at me at net. The problem was that they were going around me. Serve is up center. Cindy shifts to center to mirror ball. Opponent hits angle to alley. Point lost. Rinse and repeat.

I honestly thought about retreating to the baseline so I could at least run over and hit a groundstroke. I didn't. They tried to go up the line, I hit a winner, and they stopped. Had they kept at it, I wasn't sure what I was gonna do.

Rickson
04-27-2009, 09:08 AM
If your partner is serving so slow the ball doesn't even reach the baseline, you should stay back so you at least have a chance at something at a blazing return of serve.

raiden031
04-27-2009, 10:07 AM
Raiden, I was playing yesterday with a lady who struggles with her serve. She was serving helium balloons yesterday. The problem wasn't that they were going at me at net. The problem was that they were going around me. Serve is up center. Cindy shifts to center to mirror ball. Opponent hits angle to alley. Point lost. Rinse and repeat.


I just ordered The Art of Doubles and there are some things in there that don't seem quite right to me. Here is one example that covers what you are talking about. They say that you should ALWAYS poach when your server hits the ball down the T.

The problem is this:

If the returner is returning from the T with their forehand, that means they are receiving an inside shot, in which case the higher percentage return (specified by Wardlaw Directionals) would actually be the down the alley return (apparently low percentage in doubles). To clarify, returning cross-court with your forehand on the down the T serve is inside-out, which is considered low percentage. But if your poacher is following the rule to ALWAYS poach, then that alley return becomes open.

I tried following this rule of thumb given by Art of Doubles in a pickup doubles match with some 3.5s the other day, and I got burned numerous times down the alley. The problems were 1) these 3.5s always go for more down the alley shots than is recommended and 2) since I was poaching after EVERY serve down the T, they particularly had an easy time on second serves, which are not known to be big weapons at the 3.5 level.

Is there really any truth that you should be poaching every down the T serve?

Cindysphinx
04-27-2009, 10:22 AM
I just ordered The Art of Doubles and there are some things in there that don't seem quite right to me. Here is one example that covers what you are talking about. They say that you should ALWAYS poach when your server hits the ball down the T.

The problem is this:

If the returner is returning from the T with their forehand, that means they are receiving an inside shot, in which case the higher percentage return (specified by Wardlaw Directionals) would actually be the down the alley return (apparently low percentage in doubles). To clarify, returning cross-court with your forehand on the down the T serve is inside-out, which is considered low percentage. But if your poacher is following the rule to ALWAYS poach, then that alley return becomes open.

I tried following this rule of thumb given by Art of Doubles in a pickup doubles match with some 3.5s the other day, and I got burned numerous times down the alley. The problems were 1) these 3.5s always go for more down the alley shots than is recommended and 2) since I was poaching after EVERY serve down the T, they particularly had an easy time on second serves, which are not known to be big weapons at the 3.5 level.

Is there really any truth that you should be poaching every down the T serve?

I didn't understand AofD to be saying you have to poach every serve down the T. (Maybe it does in fact say that, I haven't looked at it recently). I think it says you have to be ready to poach, you have to consider poaching. What you have to do is stand smack dab in front of the ball when it goes up the T, so if this means a slight adjustment to be in front of the ball, good.

So if you know your returner has that fancy FH shot where they can take it behind you into the alley, then you don't necessarily poach, but you do move. I would say you should fake just as much as you poach in that situation.

True? False?

raiden031
04-27-2009, 10:26 AM
I didn't understand AofD to be saying you have to poach every serve down the T. (Maybe it does in fact say that, I haven't looked at it recently). I think it says you have to be ready to poach, you have to consider poaching. What you have to do is stand smack dab in front of the ball when it goes up the T, so if this means a slight adjustment to be in front of the ball, good.

So if you know your returner has that fancy FH shot where they can take it behind you into the alley, then you don't necessarily poach, but you do move. I would say you should fake just as much as you poach in that situation.

True? False?

I don't have the book on me, but if I recall the chapter on poaching (ch. 5?) said "it is not an option" to poach on the T serve, you must do it. I seem to recall their being some difference between first edition and second edition (I have 2nd edition).

How do you mirror the ball without opening up the alley return? Mirroring the ball means you are just about in the center of the court, leaving that huge gaping hole behind you.

EDIT: The book says on every serve you should start out moving forward (agreed, because you want to move forward and diagonal in the event that you do poach), and if its wide you stay home and if its down the T you move towards the front center to poach.

sureshs
04-27-2009, 10:30 AM
I adopt the matador position as soon as possible, just peeking a little bit to see if the guy is going to mishit and I will have a chance. With glasses, I don't want to take any risk just to impress a bunch of people who sure are not going to pay my medical bills.

Babo
04-27-2009, 10:34 AM
I feel for you, I've had a few opponents that weren't seemingly interested in playing a professional game, they just wanted to hit someone. I'm not ashamed to say that after they hit my opponent point blank in the back when he was fleeing (and standing out of bounds) I started yelling and ended up jumping over the net. After they apologized I hit the hardest second serve return directly at the net player's face...he just barely got out of the way. I don't care if I sound like a hot head because anyone whos played me knows I am usually very calm. These *****holes deserved what was coming to them, the whole club knows their reputation now.

larry10s
04-27-2009, 10:40 AM
#1 wardlow laws are more for singles since in doubles you will most often return crosscourt even if its an inside out fh or bh. #2 you start in the middle of the service box when the ball goes up the t you take a step towards the t the poach has to be timed so as not to let the receiver see you going and then hit behind you. #3 my guess is the book says be ready to poacg with an up the t serve because if you are too predictable the receiver knows you are going and will hit behind you. #4 by fake poaching, going sometime, going early on purpose to make the returner hit to you ( i like this one),etc put doubt in the returners mind of where to aim their returns and makes you an effective net player

raiden031
04-27-2009, 11:05 AM
#1 wardlow laws are more for singles since in doubles you will most often return crosscourt even if its an inside out fh or bh. #2 you start in the middle of the service box when the ball goes up the t you take a step towards the t the poach has to be timed so as not to let the receiver see you going and then hit behind you. #3 my guess is the book says be ready to poacg with an up the t serve because if you are too predictable the receiver knows you are going and will hit behind you. #4 by fake poaching, going sometime, going early on purpose to make the returner hit to you ( i like this one),etc put doubt in the returners mind of where to aim their returns and makes you an effective net player

In books like Art of Dubs, I think they must be making asumptions that you have a competent server as a partner. Most of us probably play between 3.0-4.0 (especially 3.5), so you're often trying to poach on weak second serves (or even weak first serves at times). When they say poach the center T, and your partner has a weak 2nd serve, you really gotta wait to make that movement because the server's ball will take a while to get to your opponent, and getting that timing right can be difficult. When you have a big serving partner, it is very easy because as soon as you see the ball going down the T, the opponent doesn't have much time to adjust to your movement so the poach is easy. So I get annoyed when a book says "do this", then doing that in practice fails miserably. They need to have books that teach you how to poach when your partner sucks. LOL.

Nellie
04-27-2009, 11:24 AM
Original post: Oh yes - I would have some words for the "headhunter" - Tennis is a fun game and should be not result in injuries to the opponents. I would not hit back, but I would leave that court after a couple of times. I am assuming, that when the ball is in the air, you are not running up to block the overhead with your body.

As to the question regarding the directionals, I would agree that the return for a serve down the middle would not, classically, be wide to the alley because of the net person. If you (the person at the net) are getting passed a lot, you may have been moving too far to the middle. I would not be right at the tee, but instead, a couple of feet over from the middle.

Cindysphinx
04-27-2009, 01:49 PM
Raiden, I kind of think of it as blocking. Even if I'm not going to poach (returner hits too hard, serves are too weak), I think it makes sense to mirror the ball so it blocks your opponent. Yes, they can hit behind you. But your hands aren't tied behind your back. You can volley that ball going into the alley just as easily as you can volley the crosscourt counterpart, so long as you're not leaning.

I can assure you that the winners my opponents hit into the alleys weren't poaches! I was just mirroring the ball and they hit a good shot. Few at my level can make that shot regularly, so I figure the odds are on my side.

Steady Eddy
04-27-2009, 02:03 PM
A headhunter shouldn't be that much of a problem. When a shot sets up short, you're at the net, and this guy is cranking up...duck beneath the net, 'cause you know what's coming. Don't listen to a partner who says, "Hey! Hang in there." You've no obligation to get hurt when your partner sets you up like that, (and that's usually how these situations come about, isn't it?) When you get a chance, nail the headhunter, promptly offer an insincere apology, (don't people see the value of insincerity anymore?). Take a tip from baseball players, when they get hit they run to 1st base like it doesn't sting at all, even though you know it does. They want the pitcher to think they're like, "Thank you for the free base." and that they're not rattled at all. Be the same way with the headhunter. Protect yourself, retaliate, and smile when he hits long after you duck.

raiden031
04-27-2009, 02:06 PM
Raiden, I kind of think of it as blocking. Even if I'm not going to poach (returner hits too hard, serves are too weak), I think it makes sense to mirror the ball so it blocks your opponent. Yes, they can hit behind you. But your hands aren't tied behind your back. You can volley that ball going into the alley just as easily as you can volley the crosscourt counterpart, so long as you're not leaning.

I can assure you that the winners my opponents hit into the alleys weren't poaches! I was just mirroring the ball and they hit a good shot. Few at my level can make that shot regularly, so I figure the odds are on my side.

Well if the ball is going down the T and you are lined up straight with the ball, you might as well be poaching because you have left too much open court behind you to cover the alley. Once you start that movement, I don't think its easy to suddenly change directions and volley the alley shot. I don't think it [the alley return] is a hard shot to pull off either (as it was pulled off numerous times by a couple 3.5s against me the other day while experimenting), but as someone mentioned, the key is that you don't get to that position too soon otherwise your opponent has time to see your position and set up for the alley shot.

raiden031
04-27-2009, 06:59 PM
Cindy,

Here is what the Art of Doubles says about poaching down the T:


If, however, the serve is to the inside, you must move to the center line and cover the middle at a minimum. This movement is not optional....You are never obligated to cross the center line, particularly if you feel that the return is too fast, too low, or too wide.


It also says never to poach the outside ball:


If the serve goes to the outside, honor your mirroring responsibilities and forget all thoughts of poaching.


These views seem too extreme and predictable to me.

Cindysphinx
04-27-2009, 07:11 PM
Cindy,

Here is what the Art of Doubles says about poaching down the T:



It also says never to poach the outside ball:



These views seem too extreme and predictable to me.

I would agree with the first idea (always move to the middle). I think the person who actually can go behind you is rare. It is low-percentage. If they want it, they can have it. I don't define "middle" as make the ball line up with your belly button, though. And you do have to be balanced and ready to try to cover the line.

The second idea about not poaching the outside ball also seems correct to me. In other words, unless I have a partner with a very big serve, I simply am not going to reach that ball. That said, I do think it is fine to poach the outside ball if the returner must take his BH up the line to beat you. Again, I change my tune once they prove to me that they can beat me up the line with their BH.

mutantducky
04-27-2009, 07:29 PM
to the op- i would say anything goes when it comes to serve returns. if your partner or you have a bad serve then get the net guy back. top doubles you sometimes see really aggressive play. now if someone starts smacking the ball on a put away at a net player then yeah it is an issue. poor sportsmanship

herrburgess
04-27-2009, 07:44 PM
I feel for you, I've had a few opponents that weren't seemingly interested in playing a professional game, they just wanted to hit someone. I'm not ashamed to say that after they hit my opponent point blank in the back when he was fleeing (and standing out of bounds) I started yelling and ended up jumping over the net. After they apologized I hit the hardest second serve return directly at the net player's face...he just barely got out of the way. I don't care if I sound like a hot head because anyone whos played me knows I am usually very calm. These *****holes deserved what was coming to them, the whole club knows their reputation now.

In the finals at States last year I took the approach of retaliating for each of my opponents' bad calls (for which their team was notorious) with an overhead aimed at the net guy. By the end of the match I had hit each player 4 times. They eventually won the match, which I suppose goes to show that cheating on line calls is more effective than head hunting.

NoMansLandPlayer
04-27-2009, 08:26 PM
HH is total bush league and should not be tolerated. Scumbags like this take all the fun out of playing.

LuckyR
04-28-2009, 08:07 AM
"Headhunting" returns from near the baseline is an essential myth. If the shot is so fast that you can't return it, then at head height it is going out. If the ball will land in, it is going at a speed that is returnable (usually for a winner).

As to poaching off of serves to the T. You should never "always" do anything in tennis, singles or doubles. Even the best shot is mediocre if it is predictable. However, poaching off of shots from the center of the court takes away the alley angle for the returner so the netman should be playing closer to the center as well, so taking a few extra steps and poaching is very reasonable.

penang
04-28-2009, 08:21 AM
I feel for you, I've had a few opponents that weren't seemingly interested in playing a professional game, they just wanted to hit someone. I'm not ashamed to say that after they hit my opponent point blank in the back when he was fleeing (and standing out of bounds) I started yelling and ended up jumping over the net. After they apologized I hit the hardest second serve return directly at the net player's face...he just barely got out of the way. I don't care if I sound like a hot head because anyone whos played me knows I am usually very calm. These *****holes deserved what was coming to them, the whole club knows their reputation now.

That isn't cool to hit someone when he/she fleeing out of court. I will do the same, blast at the opponent at the net when I serve.
I think HH is part of the game and to be played to win. Better than someone who serve aces after aces on foot fault that many people don't mention on this forum.

Majik
04-28-2009, 10:30 AM
I will do the same, blast at the opponent at the net when I serve. I think HH is part of the game and to be played to win.

Is it legal to aim your serve at the net man in doubles? Do they consider it against the "code"?

penang
04-29-2009, 08:06 AM
Is it legal to aim your serve at the net man in doubles? Do they consider it against the "code"?

I don't think so and do not recommend. This will cause riot.

Nellie
04-29-2009, 08:36 AM
There is simply no need to hit at someone's head.
Even if you are being aggressive and trying to "hit" the netman, aiming high will just give him/her a chance to reflex volley and win the point, so you are always better off hitting at the player's feet. I may not like it when I get hit the legs, but I don't really get annoyed at the opponents

herrburgess
04-29-2009, 08:40 AM
There is simply no need to hit at someone's head.
Even if you are being aggressive and trying to "hit" the netman, aiming high will just give him/her a chance to reflex volley and win the point, so you are always better off hitting at the player's feet. I may not like it when I get hit the legs, but I don't really get annoyed at the opponents

I thought "head hunting" was just a euphemism...I didn't think it actually meant hitting at someone's head, just aiming at the person in an attempt to win the point (and maybe intimidate), but not to injure.

raiden031
04-29-2009, 08:42 AM
I thought "head hunting" was just a euphemism...I didn't think it actually meant hitting at someone's head, just aiming at the person in an attempt to win the point (and maybe intimidate), but not to injure.

I get the impression they are talking about the intent being to hit the person in such a way that if the person avoids the shot, the ball will likely land out of bounds.

woodrow1029
04-29-2009, 08:52 AM
Is it legal to aim your serve at the net man in doubles? Do they consider it against the "code"?
Yes it is legal. It will cause arguments though.

Joeyg
04-29-2009, 09:13 AM
I hope you all don't think too poorly of me, but there was a match a few years ago where I lost it a bit. It was 8.0 mixed and the guy was a decent 4.0 playing with a very good 4.0 woman. I was and am a fairly strong 4.5. After several attempts by the man to intimidate my partner, I approached him on a changeover and basically asked him to tone it down a bit, that they were going to win anyway and there was no reason to be so gung ho. He glared at me and pretty much told me to mind my own business and if my partner couldn't take the "heat" she shouldn't be playing. Now at this point I got a little testy myself. I thought, hmmm...heat, not a bad idea. I have a pretty good serve, around 100-110 or so when I choose to hit it flat. For my next service game, when i was supposed to serve to the woman, I hit every first serve at the net guy. After the first two, he became belligerant and asked what my problem was. I told him that I couldn't control the "heat", but if he couldn't take it, perhaps he should move back to the baseline. The match pretty much went hteir way after that and they won. At the net after it was over, he refused to shake my hand. Believe it or not, he had his captain come over and threaten to file a grievance with USTA Norcal against me. I told him to go right ahead, I would look forward to a hearing. I never saw or heard from him again.

Sublime
04-29-2009, 09:58 AM
These are tennis balls we're talking about right?

Cindysphinx
04-29-2009, 12:25 PM
I hope you all don't think too poorly of me, but there was a match a few years ago where I lost it a bit. It was 8.0 mixed and the guy was a decent 4.0 playing with a very good 4.0 woman. I was and am a fairly strong 4.5. After several attempts by the man to intimidate my partner, I approached him on a changeover and basically asked him to tone it down a bit, that they were going to win anyway and there was no reason to be so gung ho. He glared at me and pretty much told me to mind my own business and if my partner couldn't take the "heat" she shouldn't be playing. Now at this point I got a little testy myself. I thought, hmmm...heat, not a bad idea. I have a pretty good serve, around 100-110 or so when I choose to hit it flat. For my next service game, when i was supposed to serve to the woman, I hit every first serve at the net guy. After the first two, he became belligerant and asked what my problem was. I told him that I couldn't control the "heat", but if he couldn't take it, perhaps he should move back to the baseline. The match pretty much went hteir way after that and they won. At the net after it was over, he refused to shake my hand. Believe it or not, he had his captain come over and threaten to file a grievance with USTA Norcal against me. I told him to go right ahead, I would look forward to a hearing. I never saw or heard from him again.

Just curious . . . what did his attempt to intimidate your partner look like, exactly?

Cindy -- who apparently doesn't live in a world where male mixed players protect the honour of their damsels in distress

Fedace
04-29-2009, 12:30 PM
:)Well, to finish the story, I didn't retaliate. At one point the guy literally knocked the hat off my head. I really wanted to jump over the net and pound the guy in the to the court but contained myself. The only think I really did was on one of his head shots i got a clean winner volley and told him to keep bringing it, I wasn't intimidated

We ended up losing in a 3rd set tiebreaker so that makes it harder to swallow.

If this is a league or USTA match, i would definitely report this. IF this is NCAA college match then you can file a grievance with the NCAA office. They take this kind of conduct very seriously. One time this guy accidently hit a ball right at the net guy and missed his head by 2 inches. I know it was a accident cause it was a drop volley and he barely got to the ball and didn't have any control really. but he got a Warning from the Umpire anyway for Unsportsman like conduct. and next one would have been point penalty...

woodrow1029
04-29-2009, 01:16 PM
Fedace is wrong by the way. As far as the legality of hitting at the net man, there's nothing you can do. It is a fair shot.

If someone got a code for hitting someone, it would have been because the ball was out of play and the player hit it at him either intentionally out of anger, or unintentionally and recklessly.

Sublime
04-29-2009, 01:24 PM
Fedace is wrong by the way. As far as the legality of hitting at the net man, there's nothing you can do. It is a fair shot.


It's been said a bunch in this thread, but it is a totally legal shot. An easily volleyed, somewhat tasteless, and definitely stupid shot, but legal nonetheless.

If you're going to hit at the net person, the best place to aim is their backhand hip pocket. Low clearance over the net, topspin bringing it below the net cord before it gets to the net person.

Fedace
04-29-2009, 01:38 PM
NO, if you aim for the head intentionally and it is deem to be so by the Umpire, you WILL get a warning. I saw this guy doing something as simple as punching the tennis ball in anger after the point and he got a Warning from the Ump.

Joeyg
04-29-2009, 02:51 PM
Fedace, I know you have probably never heard this before, but you are mistaken in your interpretation of the rules.

Cindy, by intimidate, I mean that he hit EVERY ball at her as hard as he could regardless of his or her position on the court. I realize that everyone is fair game, but his behavior was just a bit more than I was willing to accept.

OrangePower
04-29-2009, 02:54 PM
It's been said a bunch in this thread, but it is a totally legal shot. An easily volleyed, somewhat tasteless, and definitely stupid shot, but legal nonetheless.

If you're going to hit at the net person, the best place to aim is their backhand hip pocket. Low clearance over the net, topspin bringing it below the net cord before it gets to the net person.

Out of interest, why backhand hip pocket as opposed to forehand hip pocket? Seems to me that a ball directed at the backhand hip pocket can be easily blocked with a backhand, but one directed at the forehand hip pocket is more akward to get to.

Sublime
04-30-2009, 06:21 AM
Out of interest, why backhand hip pocket as opposed to forehand hip pocket? Seems to me that a ball directed at the backhand hip pocket can be easily blocked with a backhand, but one directed at the forehand hip pocket is more akward to get to.

Just my experience. At the 3.5 and below (singles) rankings most people don't play the net with a continental grip, a lot use an EFH grip. Usually when you hit to this person's BH hip pocket they either try to move to volley it with a FH and get jammed or do their best to hit a BH volley which usually ends up in the net or something you can really work with for a winner.

I agree though, someone who has good volleying fundamentals, the FH pocket is the place to go.

woodrow1029
04-30-2009, 09:07 AM
NO, if you aim for the head intentionally and it is deem to be so by the Umpire, you WILL get a warning. I saw this guy doing something as simple as punching the tennis ball in anger after the point and he got a Warning from the Ump.
After the point, yes, if you hit at someone, you will get a code violation and possibly defaulted depending on the severity. During the point, it's fair game.

blakesq
04-30-2009, 07:02 PM
If your serve hits the netman (before it bounces) it is your point. It is legal, but likely to escalate bad blood. I have done it when I am exceptionally angry at my opponents.


Is it legal to aim your serve at the net man in doubles? Do they consider it against the "code"?

blakesq
04-30-2009, 07:03 PM
Warning for what? what rule are you violating if you "aim for the head" intentionally?

NO, if you aim for the head intentionally and it is deem to be so by the Umpire, you WILL get a warning. I saw this guy doing something as simple as punching the tennis ball in anger after the point and he got a Warning from the Ump.