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suwanee4712
05-07-2009, 09:50 AM
Has anyone else read Cach's autobiography? A rather odd book in some ways, but I was very interested and read it rather quickly. I remembered there being some players upset when the book came out, and now I see why.
He lets just everybody have it, from Mac to Newk to even Claudia Kohde Kilsch and the entire country of Austria.

The book is just so negative and there's always an excuse for everything it seems. I can't count the number of times that he uses the word "betrayed" in the book.

Now I'm not saying that he's lying about anything. It's just that he's a Wimbledon champion and lucky to have had the chances that he has. Though I don't get the feeling that he fully appreciates that. Maybe I'm wrong. But that's the impression I was left with.

Anyone else who has read that book have any thoughts?

Especially on the accusations he makes against his coach, Ian Barclay, John Newcombe, Paul McNamee, Mark Phillipousis, and Greg Rusedski?

Winners or Errors
05-07-2009, 10:11 AM
Wow. Now you've made me want to read it. Perhaps that's why the editors pushed him in this direction... as I suspect they did.

suwanee4712
05-07-2009, 10:28 AM
Yeah, you never know what all goes into a book deal. And his rows with most of those people were fairly public. So they may have required him to dish.

But he says some things about Vitas Gerulitis that I don't think a friend should say in a book. I'm pretty sure this is part of what got Mac so mad with him, besides the barbs aimed at him too.

He makes some serious accusations about Lendl and tells of a time in Monte Carlo when he supposedly grabbed Lendl by the throat in the locker room and had to be pulled off of him.

He names names in almost all cases. Including some well known coaches, agents, and tour officials.

I may have to reread the book just to remember all of the people he took to task.

grafselesfan
05-07-2009, 10:36 AM
He has always been very upfront and candid. Some love it, others find it downright rude and tactless at times. It was well publicized when he referred to Davenport as looking like a shot putter earlier this decade. Even though it is well known Davenport worked her butt off to get as fit as she was, and was extremely fit by that point in time, and cant help her build or natural unathletic body and look.

tonyg11
05-07-2009, 11:00 AM
he wrote a book and was honest about his life. Who wants to read a boring book full of BS about how perfect your life was. The reason why any would be ****ed is that he's telling the truth. And we all know the truth hurts. Sounds like a good read.

galain
05-07-2009, 11:59 AM
The incident with Lendl is pretty well known - I've heard various accounts but all seem to agree that Lendl "started it" by pulling on Cash's shoes and the speed lacing system fell apart, then Cash went beserk.

Cash's book is a great read and I thought, really brave of him to mention all the things he did (or thick - you do wonder how much he proof read before he signed off for the ghost writer).

suwanee4712
05-07-2009, 02:30 PM
True. Pat referred to Lendl as "Mr. Shoebreaker." He also called him a racist and homophobe. Pat said that he still takes great pleasure in denying Lendl a Wimbledon title.

The book is very interesting. But to listen to Pat, the world was always against him. And most of his relationships end in some sort of betrayal from his point of view. I'm always leery of people who play the perpetual victim. But it is his book, and what he said very well could've happened as he said it did.

I would just hope that a fantastic and accomplished athlete like Pat would be happy and satisfied with his career. But he spent more space complaining about being disrespected by Tennis Australia, the press, and key figures than he did lamenting on his successes and great fortune to do what he did for a living.

However, that might not make for as interesting a read. :wink:

gpt
05-07-2009, 03:31 PM
Well said suwanee. Pat Cash Snr was a lawyer in Melbourne. He was considered hardnosed, ruthless and relentless in his practice. The Cash family's take on the world is that everyone is out to get them. The are decendants of bushranger Ned Kelly and seem to have collectively inherited his victimised outlook. In fact the family produced a short film in the 80's in which Pat starred as Kelly.
I played a few junior tournaments in Melbourne and I played Cash on clay the same week John Lennon was killed. He was leadding 4-0 and serving when I went up 0-40 with a couple of 'caution to the wind' winners. He walked to the back fence and swore and cursed to himself. After what seemed like a minute he stepped up to serve. He served to clean aces followed by a virtual ace that I only just framed. He went on to whip me 6-0. He shook hands and wished me luck in the doubles. My doubles partner who was sitting behind, Cash later told me that when he went to the fence he was swearing and racially abusing me and calling me all the names under the sun. His competitiveness is to be admired and he always came across as serious and focused. I haven't yet read his book.

AndrewD
05-07-2009, 04:08 PM
The Cash family's take on the world is that everyone is out to get them.

The are decendants of bushranger Ned Kelly and seem to have collectively inherited his victimised outlook. In fact the family produced a short film in the 80's in which Pat starred as Kelly.


LOL, Cash's family was SUPPOSED to have been related to a bushranger called Martin Cash. End result, they weren't.

Ned Kelly LOL.

We don't play on clay in Melbourne.

gpt
05-07-2009, 04:32 PM
Royal South Yarra tennis club 1980. Last time I looked it was still clay. Whether you call it en tous cas or porous or whatever, it is still clay. How old are you AndrewD? Do you go through life distrusting people as a rule?

Deuce
05-07-2009, 09:42 PM
My impression of Cash has always been that he's a petty, bitter man who is resentful that he never made it that 'extra step' to be considered one of the greats.

Or, to sum it up, a spoiled punk.

That he habitually blames others is hardly surprising.

galain
05-07-2009, 10:11 PM
His ghostwriter certainly paints him squarely in the victim role in the book, that's for sure. How true that is in real life, who can say? But yes - there is quite a list of tragedy, misfortune and fiasco that he seems to be on the receiving end of. Rusedski not paying him, McNamee 'stealing' the Hopman Cup from him, his physical issues and on and on it goes.

I was either feeling very sorry for the guy or thinking to myself, 'Mate - you must be getting some sort of positive reinforcement out of all this public suffering'.

And then, once the book is published, his new business partner Gavin Hopper is sent down for having an inappropriate relationship with a student while he was still a high school PE teacher. If Cash's perspective/personality is anything at all true to how his writer portrayed him it's a wonder he didn't slit his wrists there and then.

rolandg
05-08-2009, 01:05 AM
I found the book really interesting, but, yes, God can he moan. Some of it was slightly over the top, like at the end of the book, when he berates Tennis Australia for not honouring him enough, or the Australian Open, for not yet giving him a bronze head at Melbourne Park.

Still, an interesting book.

Deuce
05-08-2009, 01:40 AM
I found the book really interesting, but, yes, God can he moan. Some of it was slightly over the top, like at the end of the book, when he berates Tennis Australia for not honouring him enough, or the Australian Open, for not yet giving him a bronze head at Melbourne Park.

Really, folks... to complain that people are not praising and applauding you enough, one must be a very insecure, egotistical neanderthal.

Kind of like Jimmy Connors being upset that they named the new Stadium at Flushing after the late Arthur Ashe instead of after him.

Some of these guys need a major wake-up call...

rolandg
05-08-2009, 01:47 AM
Really, folks... to complain that people are not praising and applauding you enough, one must be a very insecure, egotistical neanderthal.

Kind of like Jimmy Connors being upset that they named the new Stadium at Flushing after the late Arthur Ashe instead of after him.

Some of these guys need a major wake-up call...

LOl true. I haven't read the book in ages but I think there is also a part when he complains about not being invited to a davis cup match in Australia. Think it was around the time he was coaching Pip, and it is yet another example of how he is not being appreciated etc

Gaucho Behrend
05-08-2009, 02:32 AM
It was an entertaining enough as a read, but old Petty Cash never made a mistake and everything was someone elses fault.

I wonder if he has holidayed in Austria, since he wrote that book.

ferb55
05-08-2009, 02:55 AM
I haven't read the book and probably wont after reading this thread. But, Cash is responsible for two of my favorite sports moments. The first was climbing into the stands to hug his dad after winning Wimbledon. Had never seen anything like it and now everyone does it. Cash was first.
The second was a simple sign in the crowd that I thought was classic. "Cash is better than a Czech!"

Moose Malloy
05-10-2009, 06:52 PM
Pat referred to Lendl as "Mr. Shoebreaker." He also called him a racist and homophobe.

can you give us some more details? did cash witness some incident w/lendl?

I played a few junior tournaments in Melbourne and I played Cash on clay the same week John Lennon was killed

interesting, cash gave an interview on tennis channel recently where he said that he grew up playing a lot on clay, which I was pretty surprised by.

gpt
05-10-2009, 10:01 PM
Moose
I grew up in Melbourne in the 70's. 90% of the courts were en tous cas (clay). There were a few plexipave and cement type courts. Most club tennis was played on clay. The wealthy clubs like Dendy Park and Royal South Yarra Had lawn courts so it was really the wealthy or the advancing juniors that played on lawn. Just about all the junior tournaments including those held at Kooyong were on clay. Before the widespead use of synthetic courts most kids learned to play on clay. It's kind of ironic considering the general perception of a tradition of grass court serve vollyers in Australian tennis. Laver, Roche and Court only really played on grass later in their development. Same goes for Cash. Writing this reminds me that as a junior Cash was number two for the most part. He won tournaments but from memory was more often than not beaten by a guy named Mark Hartnett. I think they played doubles together quite a bit. I think Hartnett suffered a chronic arm injury or something and was unable to fulfill his promise.

120mphBodyServe
05-10-2009, 10:22 PM
Pat strikes me as being a matey, sensitive guy who wears his heart on his sleeve. I empathised with him greatly while reading the book, and I appreciated his blunt honesty about life on the tour, how it was for him and so on...
I do not consider his story to be whining or complaining, I just think that's the reality of it...
And for people on this forum to take cheapshots at what he's written without having any idea what life is like on the tour, or even thinking of what it could be like, is rather low, imho...
I do not appreciate the comments of one prominent member on here.
GRRR.

Deuce
05-10-2009, 11:10 PM
Pat strikes me as being a matey, sensitive guy who wears his heart on his sleeve. I empathised with him greatly while reading the book, and I appreciated his blunt honesty about life on the tour, how it was for him and so on...
I do not consider his story to be whining or complaining, I just think that's the reality of it...
And for people on this forum to take cheapshots at what he's written without having any idea what life is like on the tour, or even thinking of what it could be like, is rather low, imho...
I do not appreciate the comments of one prominent member on here.
GRRR.
Ok, so you've got a bias in favour of Cash. Thanks for establishing that.

I, myself, have no bias for or against. I am assessing him based on what I've seen of him, and heard from him. And based on that, I assess him as a whiner who feels that he is 'entitled' to be regarded as one of the greats, and criticizes those who do not recognize him as such.
I am clearly not alone in this assessment - one need only read this thread to see that several others have a similar perspective.

How, may I ask, do you know that Cash is telling the truth about "what it's like on the tour"? You criticize us for our negative view of Cash, and say that we are not in a position to assess, as we've never been on the tour. But have you? What places you in a better position to assess than us?

Further, if "life on the tour" were truly how Cash portrays it, do you not think that just about every book written by a former pro would be written with the same whining tone and sense of entitlement as Cash's book?
But they're not.
Seems that ol' Pat thinks he's not only a perpetual victim, but THE ONLY victim. Everyone else are the villains.
If you don't see this because of your bias, that's fine - that's your right. But try not to tell us that we're way off the mark because we have no idea what the tour is like when you yourself know no more than us, and when other players who've written autobiographies have not whined or played the role of 'victim' nearly to the degree that Cash has.

120mphBodyServe
05-10-2009, 11:19 PM
Ok, so you've got a bias in favour of Cash. Thanks for establishing that .

I, myself, have no bias for or against. I am assessing him based on what I've seen of him, and heard from him. And based on that, I assess him as a whiner who feels that he is 'entitled' to bee regarded as one of the greats, and criticizes those who do not recognize him as such.
I am clearly not alone in this assessment - one need only read this thread to see that several others have this perspective, as well.

How, may I ask, do you know that Cash is telling the truth about "what it's like on the tour"? You criticize us for our negative view of Cash, and say that we are not in a position to assess, as we've never been on the tour. But have you? What places you in a better position to assess than us?

Further, if "life on the tour" were truly how Cash portrays it, do you not think that just about every book written by a former pro would be written in the same whining tone as Cash's book?
But they're not.
Seems that ol' Pat thinks he's not only a perpetual victim, but THE ONLY victim. Everyone else are the villains.
If you don't see this because of your bias, that's fine - that's your right. But try not to tell us that we're way off the mark because we have no idea what the tour is like when you yourself know no more than us, and when other players who've written autobiographies have not whined or played the role of 'victim' nearly to the degree that Cash has.

You come across as a complainer. A complainer complaining about others who complain...
Why don't you take a happy pill, and give us all a break?

Deuce
05-10-2009, 11:29 PM
You come across as a complainer. A complainer complaining about others who complain...
Why don't you take a happy pill, and give us all a break?
You accuse a bunch of us of taking "cheapshots", and claim that we have no idea what we're talking about... and then you say that Iam a complainer?!!?

You're the one whining here - to 'protect' your 'hero' Pat Cash - the same Pat Cash who very publicly takes very cheap shots at a bunch of people.
Rather than appreciate that he was one of the few on this planet to be able to play tennis for a living - and to get all the bonuses that come with that position, he chooses to complain that people don't see him as one of the greats!
That's pretty much the definition of egotistical, arrogant obnoxiousness right there.

You need a reality check, bud.
And a mirror.

gpt
05-11-2009, 12:27 AM
People are what they are, tour or no tour A jerk is a jerk. I suspect that Edberg was nice guy before he joined the tour. The 'tour' didn't change that

slice bh compliment
05-11-2009, 01:19 AM
I haven't read the book and probably wont after reading this thread. But, Cash is responsible for two of my favorite sports moments. The first was climbing into the stands to hug his dad after winning Wimbledon. Had never seen anything like it and now everyone does it. Cash was first.
The second was a simple sign in the crowd that I thought was classic. "Cash is better than a Czech!"


That was classic. I remember it well. I was so happy for him (and happy for classic, attacking, all-court tennis in general. I was a college player playing open tournaments and the qualies of satellites at the time, and I was genuinely inspired by Cashy. That was in July of 1987.

Yannick Noah did the same thing in Paris, June 1983. Went up and hugged his dad after winning RG. Really touching moment.

Anyway, no need to psychoanalyze Patrick Cash. Been done privately on a sofa by professionals. The couple of times I was around him on and off a tennis court...he was never anything but a great player and an allright guy as fas as I could tell, but ...when you look at his myriad injuries, his ego, his weird inferiority complex, the 'close but no cigar' finishes in many, many slams (outside of 87 Wimbledon), his upbringing, his candor, his bitterness and pettiness....playing the victim's role...nothing surprising that he's kind of a jerk with a sense of entitlement.

I remember in probably 89 or 90, I had a Sergio Tacchini shirt or two from his 'line'. White with about 11 thick pastel brush strokes curving up the front. My dubs partner commented that each stripe represented one match win since he'd won Wimbledon. LOL.

Pretty cheesey, poseur-ish guy overall, if you've ever seen him in something other than tennis attire.

In the end, you get the feeling he always wanted to be seen as cool like Noah, Mac, Vitas or Becker. But he ended up more of an intense ***** like Connors or Lendl. Minus the results.

gpt
05-11-2009, 01:37 AM
One of the greatest tennis memories i have is watching Cash come back from two sets to love down to win the deciding rubber in the 86 davis cup final. Pernfors came out swinging and everything he hit was perfection. Cash just kept attacking and eventually wore him down. It was a classic match and it won Australia the Davis cup.
One of the dumbest thing I have seen him do was when Cash tried to be funny by wearing a red curly wig to his post match press conference after Becker beat him in straight sets in a Wimbledon QF. (1988 I think) I assume he must have kept the gag to himself because surely someone would have talked him out of it. It was very unfunny and appeared ungracious in defeat. It detracted from an entertaining high quality match.

BTURNER
05-11-2009, 02:27 AM
As I remember, he had the best low forehand volley and half volley I had seen and some great backhand passes.

gpt
05-11-2009, 03:26 AM
Yes, and a great backhand overhead.

120mphBodyServe
05-11-2009, 03:33 AM
You accuse a bunch of us of taking "cheapshots", and claim that we have no idea what we're talking about... and then you say that Iam a complainer?!!?

You're the one whining here - to 'protect' your 'hero' Pat Cash - the same Pat Cash who very publicly takes very cheap shots at a bunch of people.
Rather than appreciate that he was one of the few on this planet to be able to play tennis for a living - and to get all the bonuses that come with that position, he chooses to complain that people don't see him as one of the greats!
That's pretty much the definition of egotistical, arrogant obnoxiousness right there.

You need a reality check, bud.
And a mirror.

Excuse me but no. Have you even read the book? Nowhere in does he state that he should have been seen as one of the "greats"...
Anyway he never could have been, since he always had trouble with injuries...
Oh yeah and nice edit.. I saw that post before you edited it..
It took you a few hours just to think of that?? Nice....

Moose Malloy
05-11-2009, 08:52 AM
Moose
I grew up in Melbourne in the 70's. 90% of the courts were en tous cas (clay). There were a few plexipave and cement type courts. Most club tennis was played on clay.

was it red or green clay(or something similar)? thanks

BTW, Yannick Noah did the same thing in Paris, June 1983. Went up and hugged his dad after winning RG. Really touching moments. Very natural, spontaneous, emotional, original and genuine.


Yannick never made it to the stands, his dad ran onto the court(as did quite a few fans)

gpt
05-11-2009, 03:06 PM
The clay courts of Melbourne were red.I think En tout cas is/was a British company that devised the clay courts used in Melbourne. I seem to remember that it is made from crushed red bricks. But I stand to be corrected

Kaptain Karl
05-11-2009, 03:47 PM
Slice - Stop clicking REFRESH on your browser. You're making your posts repeat ... repeat ... repeat.

- KK

AndrewD
05-11-2009, 04:18 PM
Royal South Yarra tennis club 1980. Last time I looked it was still clay. Whether you call it en tous cas or porous or whatever, it is still clay.

"Royal South Yarra tennis club 1980" - what in the bloody hell is that supposed to mean? You might as well have written, 'scratched arse 1979' - without context is makes just as little sense.

En tous cas is 'dirt' or 'porous' but it is not clay. That's just an affectation.


How old are you AndrewD? Do you go through life distrusting people as a rule?

Mate, I'm not stupid enough to ask someone how old they are, as if the answer will, in some way, make my failings less apparent.

Pointing out that you were wrong about two particular things doesn't make me distrustful. It does, however, make you untrustworthy.

gpt
05-11-2009, 04:45 PM
AndrewD I only asked how old you were in the hope that you may still be young enough to grow out of your unhospitable immaturity. I contribute to this forum because I enjoy the mostly intelligent and insightful discussion of the great game that is tennis. Your reply to my post came across as distrustful because you wrote that 'we dont play on clay in melbourne'. The implication being that my annecdote was without integrity. I have since read previous posts of yours and it seems to me that you are an intelligent person.
Perhaps you suffer a personality disorder or are just argumentative. Either way, thanks for correcting me re Martin Cash.

You may place great import on semantics but bricks are made of clay. En tout cas tennis courts are clay. I dont care if you wont concede that. If Laver, Cash, Rosewall, Newcombe, Phillipoussis etc refer to en tout cas courts as clay then it is good enough for me. Any person in the world (beyond Melbourne) knows what type of surface it is if you call it clay. It IS clay.

PERL
05-11-2009, 04:59 PM
Reading the book I thought Pat Cash was a good guy overall although tormented and impulsive.

slice bh compliment
05-11-2009, 06:40 PM
Slice - Stop clicking REFRESH on your browser. You're making your posts repeat ... repeat ... repeat.

- KK

sorry mate

thanks for the edit

[it wasn't a multiple refresh, it just wasn't responding, so I was heavy handed with the ''submit reply'' button]

suwanee4712
05-11-2009, 08:49 PM
Pat is still one of my favorite players to watch on the court. I can remember watching his final Wimbledon when he had to retire, and I felt so badly for him. The truth is, he did have more than his share of bad luck.

I suppose the reason why I was taken aback by the tone of the book is that I wanted him to seem happier. He's a Wimbledon champion. But he says point black at the beginning of his book that winning Wimbledon is not the cure all that everyone thinks that it is. I was surprised by that. But he would certainly know more about that than I.

One of the more positive moments in his book is when he talks about beating Pernfors to win the Davis Cup. I have been fortunate to see Michael in and around the Stone Mountain, GA area from time to time and ask him a few questions. That's not one of his matches that I've asked about. But I would like to see it one day.

plasma
05-11-2009, 08:59 PM
het gpt, I find it ironic and frankly somewhat disturbing that hearing of a racial slur directly against you seems to prompt you to admire the individual that dealt it. If I was your doubles partner and sat behind an individual who said something like that, that person would get their teeth knocked in, in a hurry.

gpt
05-11-2009, 09:48 PM
Plasma. Please do not be disturbed. I do not admire the individual, i think he is a jerk. But i did admire his determination and competitiveness. As someone said previously, i also suspect that Pat Cash needed more hugs. Breaking his teeth would not change his take on life but you sound like a loyal friend or doubles partner.

nfor304
05-12-2009, 07:09 AM
I read somewhere that Cash is one of the least 'winningest' Grand slam winners of all time. something like winning 6 career titles, inc Wimbledon

Micce
05-12-2009, 12:41 PM
By making some searches it appears that En Tout Cas plays similar to clay and looks like red clay, but it's not considered the same surface:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=146055&postcount=14
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showpost.php?p=146117&postcount=16
http://www.entoutcas.com.au/entoutcas.htm

In 1909, a British firm named En Tout Cas (its name was taken from a French idiom meaning "all weather") solved the drainage problem by replacing the clay surface course with a blended mixture of crushed brick. This new material played similar to clay despite its considerably more granular appearance. The crushed brick surface allowed more water to run through the surface of the court drying the surface more quickly after a rain.

http://www.xsports.com/clay.html

About the Royal South Yarra Tennis Club:

The primary sporting activity of the Club is tennis, conducted on 25 courts – 10 grass courts and 15 porous all-weather courts lit for night play.

http://www.rsyltc.org.au/Public/AbouttheClub/tabid/153/Default.aspx

Moose Malloy
05-12-2009, 12:53 PM
By making some searches it appears that En Tout Cas plays similar to clay and looks like red clay, but it's not considered the same surface

guess someone should tell cash(he calls it clay)

I read somewhere that Cash is one of the least 'winningest' Grand slam winners of all time. something like winning 6 career titles, inc Wimbledon

And he's probably the 'most injured' Grand Slam winner of the open era. look up his player activity/career matches played, etc & compare to other one slam winners like Krajicek, Stich, etc.

amazing that he did so well in the majors with so few shots at playing them while healthy & in his prime.

gpt
05-12-2009, 02:40 PM
If I remember correctly ( Andy will set me right if I'm not) Cash made the Wimbledon QF only weeks after an appendix operation. He suffered a lot of stomach problems through his career and subsequently changed what was a very effective service action to compensate for it. A lower ball toss and a compact but accelerated swing was implored to lessen the stress on his stomach. He is to be admired for overcoming the injuries and achieving the successes he had.

NostalgiaTennisFan
10-01-2013, 09:04 AM
Has anyone else read Cach's autobiography? A rather odd book in some ways, but I was very interested and read it rather quickly. I remembered there being some players upset when the book came out, and now I see why.
He lets just everybody have it, from Mac to Newk to even Claudia Kohde Kilsch and the entire country of Austria.

The book is just so negative and there's always an excuse for everything it seems. I can't count the number of times that he uses the word "betrayed" in the book.

Now I'm not saying that he's lying about anything. It's just that he's a Wimbledon champion and lucky to have had the chances that he has. Though I don't get the feeling that he fully appreciates that. Maybe I'm wrong. But that's the impression I was left with.

Anyone else who has read that book have any thoughts?

Especially on the accusations he makes against his coach, Ian Barclay, John Newcombe, Paul McNamee, Mark Phillipousis, and Greg Rusedski?

I have read it in one sitting, it was a page turner. How much of it was true? My take would be 60%. Mr Cash leaves gray areas out to make himself appear in better light - like 99% of people. But his take on Rusedski is spot on, I mean here we have Greg's coach Brian Teacher who catapulted his pupil from just another erratic big server to the top echellons of tennis and how Does Greg repays him - by sacking him! Case closed! I also feel that the shoe breaking incident involving Lendl was true, on the other hand Cash's take on Newcombe and others comes across as highly subjective. Worst part of the book - when he tries to wax faux existentialist, it's rather cringe worthy to say the least, I mean suicidal thoughts, really Pat? You ain't the type mate, sorry to dissapoint you. Before attempting at the genre read Camus, Kiergard or Dostoevski. But I have to confess, Cash is the reason I fell in love with tennis, and his colourfull somewhat bashfull personality is reflected in the book.

bluetrain4
10-01-2013, 10:08 AM
Claudia Kohde Kilsch??

of all the people he apparently comments about, I find CKK the most random and thus the most intriguing. Was it a romantic thing? Any men I understand, can chalk it up to simply being competive, maybe too competitive and letting that fire lead to other things between guys.

BTURNER
10-01-2013, 01:41 PM
Moose
I grew up in Melbourne in the 70's. 90% of the courts were en tous cas (clay). There were a few plexipave and cement type courts. Most club tennis was played on clay. The wealthy clubs like Dendy Park and Royal South Yarra Had lawn courts so it was really the wealthy or the advancing juniors that played on lawn. Just about all the junior tournaments including those held at Kooyong were on clay. Before the widespead use of synthetic courts most kids learned to play on clay. It's kind of ironic considering the general perception of a tradition of grass court serve vollyers in Australian tennis. Laver, Roche and Court only really played on grass later in their development. Same goes for Cash. Writing this reminds me that as a junior Cash was number two for the most part. He won tournaments but from memory was more often than not beaten by a guy named Mark Hartnett. I think they played doubles together quite a bit. I think Hartnett suffered a chronic arm injury or something and was unable to fulfill his promise.

If en Tous Cas plays like clay and slides like clay, as by all accounts so far it does, do I care if it is somehow a mutation invented in 1907? It explains why Court did so well at RG. The slide was second nature, like Martina's was. I also read somewhere that Goolagong played on 'clay' as a youth. You suppose that is the real secret behind so much more success for Australian players, than Britain and Ireland exposure to this stuff and building a good ground game thereby at an early age, instead of Harry Hopman getting all the credit?

kiki
10-01-2013, 02:20 PM
That was classic. I remember it well. I was so happy for him (and happy for classic, attacking, all-court tennis in general. I was a college player playing open tournaments and the qualies of satellites at the time, and I was genuinely inspired by Cashy. That was in July of 1987.

Yannick Noah did the same thing in Paris, June 1983. Went up and hugged his dad after winning RG. Really touching moment.

Anyway, no need to psychoanalyze Patrick Cash. Been done privately on a sofa by professionals. The couple of times I was around him on and off a tennis court...he was never anything but a great player and an allright guy as fas as I could tell, but ...when you look at his myriad injuries, his ego, his weird inferiority complex, the 'close but no cigar' finishes in many, many slams (outside of 87 Wimbledon), his upbringing, his candor, his bitterness and pettiness....playing the victim's role...nothing surprising that he's kind of a jerk with a sense of entitlement.

I remember in probably 89 or 90, I had a Sergio Tacchini shirt or two from his 'line'. White with about 11 thick pastel brush strokes curving up the front. My dubs partner commented that each stripe represented one match win since he'd won Wimbledon. LOL.

Pretty cheesey, poseur-ish guy overall, if you've ever seen him in something other than tennis attire.

In the end, you get the feeling he always wanted to be seen as cool like Noah, Mac, Vitas or Becker. But he ended up more of an intense ***** like Connors or Lendl. Minus the results.

Cash was a welcome addition to a tour already rich with personalities at the very top.Specially for all of us who lured for another australian champion since Newcombe

But, having said that, he always seemed to me he played in a very insane way with drugs; I donīt know what drove him at that point.Pitty, he brought back for a moment the reminiscence of the best aussie tennis.

galain
10-01-2013, 11:44 PM
If en Tous Cas plays like clay and slides like clay, as by all accounts so far it does, do I care if it is somehow a mutation invented in 1907? It explains why Court did so well at RG. The slide was second nature, like Martina's was. I also read somewhere that Goolagong played on 'clay' as a youth. You suppose that is the real secret behind so much more success for Australian players, than Britain and Ireland exposure to this stuff and building a good ground game thereby at an early age, instead of Harry Hopman getting all the credit?

I come from melbourne and now live in Europe. En tous cas and (at least) European clay are 2 quite different surfaces. yes - you slide on both of them, but the playing characteristics are not all that similar.

In Australia, a lot of courts are referred to as 'clay' when they aren't. I wouldn't be surprised if Evonne Cawley grew up on crushed termite mounds - a popular 'clay' surface in the country areas. Perhaps technically en tous cas is a clay surface, but it doesn't really behave the same way as the stuff here in Europe.

Fedinkum
10-02-2013, 12:35 AM
Cash was exciting to watch and a superb athelete, but he smoked too much pots with Wilander.

NostalgiaTennisFan
10-28-2013, 06:16 AM
For the record, Cash was the greatest volleyer ever!

kiki
10-29-2013, 02:24 PM
For the record, Cash was the greatest volleyer ever!

Not quite, but he certainly was a top notch volleyer and one of the best low voleyer that played the game over the last 30 years.

BTURNER
10-29-2013, 04:39 PM
I come from melbourne and now live in Europe. En tous cas and (at least) European clay are 2 quite different surfaces. yes - you slide on both of them, but the playing characteristics are not all that similar.

In Australia, a lot of courts are referred to as 'clay' when they aren't. I wouldn't be surprised if Evonne Cawley grew up on crushed termite mounds - a popular 'clay' surface in the country areas. Perhaps technically en tous cas is a clay surface, but it doesn't really behave the same way as the stuff here in Europe.


This is about to become a new thread.

Rhino
10-29-2013, 04:49 PM
Definitely makes me want to read this book.

kiki
10-29-2013, 10:37 PM
This is about to become a new thread.

May explain why aussies did much better on clay than americans in the past, and why Court and Goolagong played so well on the dirt.