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View Full Version : Situation in Which You Are Most Likely To Cough Up A Point


Cindysphinx
05-12-2009, 05:33 AM
For me, it is when both opponents are at net, my partner is at net, and I am at the baseline.

I lose my head completely. I can't decide whether to lob or to pass. I can't decide whether to hit to a particular opponent or go up the middle. I worry that my ball will sit up and they will tattoo my partner. I watch them instead of watching the ball. I assume they have textbook volleys and will win the point no matter what shot I hit to them. I am also chewing myself out for letting myself get pinned in the corner like that. I have No Plan At All.

I think I could really beat some people if I could fix this problem. :(

raiden031
05-12-2009, 05:45 AM
1) Rushing too much to get to the net on a S&V and I botch the first volley.
2) Too ambitious while poaching at the net and either get passed DTL or botch a low volley I should've let go to my partner
3) Any time I try to return a backhand on the deuce side with my 1-handed topspin

cak
05-12-2009, 07:00 AM
When I misjudge my approach shot and come in on something too weak.

Though in a clinic we tried serve and volley. And I got to tell you, the only points I won in that drill were service winners. If they could return my serve it definitely wasn't something I should come in on.

OrangePower
05-12-2009, 08:39 AM
Botched attempt at a topspin lob. I have good groundstrokes. When my opponents are both at the net and I am back, the right play for me is to hit a drive. But hitting a great topspin lob is a thing of beauty, when it works. Unfortunately, I only make maybe one of four - the other three times it ends up being a nice shallow sitter of an overhead. I keep telling myself to play smart and avoid trying this so much, but somehow I can't resist. Idiot!

oldhacker
05-12-2009, 02:27 PM
For me (in doubles) it is when both opponents are at the net and I am moving up from the baseline to hit a very short ball (say halfway between net and service line). I know I should just play a controlled up and down topspin shot down the middle but for some reason I always try to chip it past one of them and mess up.

BTW Cindy - in your scenario I have a strict rule. This being that if I can move forward into the shot then I go straight between them with topspin. But if I am rushed or pushed back I hit a lob. Ideally topspin but if I am really rushed for time a more defensive chip lob.

For me, it is when both opponents are at net, my partner is at net, and I am at the baseline.

I lose my head completely. I can't decide whether to lob or to pass. I can't decide whether to hit to a particular opponent or go up the middle. I worry that my ball will sit up and they will tattoo my partner. I watch them instead of watching the ball. I assume they have textbook volleys and will win the point no matter what shot I hit to them. I am also chewing myself out for letting myself get pinned in the corner like that. I have No Plan At All.

I think I could really beat some people if I could fix this problem. :(

J011yroger
05-12-2009, 02:56 PM
I would like to think that I am not stingy nor one dimentional in the ways in which I cough up points.

You see I prefer the all-court approach to coughing up points.

Loosing most of your points in certain situations makes you predictable.

If you were possessed of my great variety and posessed the ability to double fault, as well as make errors off the forehand and backhand wings, and complimented that with incredible ability to hit the easiest volleys both into the bottom of the net, or surprisingly long, then your opponent wouldn't ever know how they were going to win on that given day.

It really saddens me how so many players only have one bad shot that is their go-to shot for loosing matches, when there are so many other shots and situations for failure. . .

J

Sublime
05-12-2009, 02:57 PM
Opponent hits a drop shot from the base line and I'm charging the net to get to it. I know that I have to push a top spinner where he isn't. When the player stays at the baseline I always decide it would be awesome if I drop shot him back just over the net, sharp angle to boot.

This is a glorious shot I've hit a few times. Unfortunately that's a few out of more than I'd like to admit... I usually end up hitting a flub slice that's a gift to kill or I put it into the tape.

OrangePower
05-12-2009, 04:18 PM
I would like to think that I am not stingy nor one dimentional in the ways in which I cough up points.

You see I prefer the all-court approach to coughing up points.

Loosing most of your points in certain situations makes you predictable.

If you were possessed of my great variety and posessed the ability to double fault, as well as make errors off the forehand and backhand wings, and complimented that with incredible ability to hit the easiest volleys both into the bottom of the net, or surprisingly long, then your opponent wouldn't ever know how they were going to win on that given day.

It really saddens me how so many players only have one bad shot that is their go-to shot for loosing matches, when there are so many other shots and situations for failure. . .

J

Classic! I hereby resolve to follow the path that Jolly has blazed, and become more well rounded in my error-making!

Topaz
05-12-2009, 04:21 PM
Any attempt by me to hit a FH lob. Might as well just catch the ball myself and award the point to my opponent!!! :shock:

Cindysphinx
05-12-2009, 05:05 PM
Classic! I hereby resolve to follow the path that Jolly has blazed, and become more well rounded in my error-making!

Nah, I can't keep all of that straight. I mean, my opponent might not fully grasp the breadth of my incompetence if I hit a dizzying array of errors.

I think the most rewarding kind of error is the Failed Lob, of the type Topaz describes. Ah, yes. You know it's going to be short because they always are. You throw that puppy up anyway. In this way, you can get your partner involved in the point as she dodges an overhead bullet.

Cindy -- who had a mixed doubles partner *beg* her not to hit any more lobs, and who decided to cooperate because the poor guy looked a bit shaken

Grover Sparkman
05-12-2009, 05:06 PM
I would like to think that I am not stingy nor one dimentional in the ways in which I cough up points.

You see I prefer the all-court approach to coughing up points.

Loosing most of your points in certain situations makes you predictable.

If you were possessed of my great variety and posessed the ability to double fault, as well as make errors off the forehand and backhand wings, and complimented that with incredible ability to hit the easiest volleys both into the bottom of the net, or surprisingly long, then your opponent wouldn't ever know how they were going to win on that given day.

It really saddens me how so many players only have one bad shot that is their go-to shot for loosing matches, when there are so many other shots and situations for failure. . .

J

I for one take this approach to losing games. I consider myself a renaissance man of losing. :lol:

lovin'it
05-13-2009, 05:31 AM
for me, the one that hurts the most is overhitting a return of serve off of the second serve. there is just no reason for that...which reminds me of another.

ya make a couple of great shots in a row and suddenly think you are SERENA! powee!! into the net, next shot, guaranteed! even worse if you get a compliment or two on those great shots.

what does it say about a person to hit a few great shots and think they have mastered this game??? confidence? or complete ignorance??

(hey, don't answer, i think i know!)

Xisbum
05-13-2009, 05:46 AM
If you play this game long enough, you will find many, many ways to cough up a point - forehands and backhands in the net, f&bs into the ground, f&bs into the back fence, f&bs into your back fence, an infinitum. I believe I have found something like 9,275 so far - and counting. ;-)

max
05-13-2009, 06:38 AM
Good thread! For me, it's trying a hard one-handed topspin backhand; this can be SO tempting because it feels SO good when it connects. . . as it rarely does.

Maybe the infrequency of success of a shot makes it all the more appealing!

Indiana Puffed
05-13-2009, 06:52 AM
Doubles - probably poaching at the wrong time. If I start with good poaching it seems to stick, but one bad poach early can throw my confidence and I end up covering the line maybe too much. Ultimately this makes it a failure to capitalise on points we could have had.

Singles - Closing in on a dink and hitting a slice/soft placed drop shot that I intend to land in their service box and far away from them, ends up going closer to them than if I had tried, usually to their forehand for an easy passing shot.

Slice backhand returns right now are the bane of my tennis existance... used to be one of my fave shot :(

J011yroger
05-13-2009, 04:27 PM
for me, the one that hurts the most is overhitting a return of serve off of the second serve. there is just no reason for that...which reminds me of another.

In all seriousness, depending on the person, I would encourage that.

If you have the time to practice, and your primary intent is to improve, and you are not playing a match that you have to win (for a team or some such) then by all means take a rip at those 2nd serves, you have to learn how to return agressively, and which balls you can attack.

Likewise, it is ok to double fault if you are working to develop a solid unattackable, or aggressive 2nd serve.

Nobody wants to go through life with a lame second serve, and return.

Especially if you are building your game to be a hitter.

My favorite drill for practicing this is a game to 7 points. The server gets one serve, and if he faults, he looses the point. If the serve goes in, the returner must either hit a clean winner, or force an error with his return or the server wins the point.

That way the server has to concentrate on making a high percentage of unattackable serves. And the returner must concentrate on punishing the return because any return that doesn't win the point outright is a failure.

J

Cindysphinx
05-13-2009, 04:46 PM
My favorite drill for practicing this is a game to 7 points. The server gets one serve, and if he faults, he looses the point. If the serve goes in, the returner must either hit a clean winner, or force an error with his return or the server wins the point.

That way the server has to concentrate on making a high percentage of unattackable serves. And the returner must concentrate on punishing the return because any return that doesn't win the point outright is a failure.

J

OK, I'm going to try this on Friday in a singles practice with a friend. I don't know if it will help us improve, but it sounds like a snortin' good time!

I will report back on how those 3.5-level second serves hold up . . .

moonbat
05-13-2009, 05:25 PM
^^^^^
Me, too, J011y. That's a great idea. And I'll hit that second serve with "belief and clarity." :)

moonbat
05-13-2009, 05:30 PM
Nah, I can't keep all of that straight. I mean, my opponent might not fully grasp the breadth of my incompetence if I hit a dizzying array of errors.

I think the most rewarding kind of error is the Failed Lob, of the type Topaz describes. Ah, yes. You know it's going to be short because they always are. You throw that puppy up anyway. In this way, you can get your partner involved in the point as she dodges an overhead bullet.

Cindy -- who had a mixed doubles partner *beg* her not to hit any more lobs, and who decided to cooperate because the poor guy looked a bit shaken

Yeah---even when I'm pinned behind the baseline, I keep trying to throw up a forehand topspin lob....slowly. D'oh!

Steady Eddy
05-13-2009, 07:21 PM
When it's break point and I'm serving. The first serve goes long and then there's a long delay in clearing the ball. I have to stand there waiting to hit the second serve, which must go in or the game ends on a double. I hate that situation. :mad:

Cindysphinx
05-15-2009, 09:15 AM
My favorite drill for practicing this is a game to 7 points. The server gets one serve, and if he faults, he looses the point. If the serve goes in, the returner must either hit a clean winner, or force an error with his return or the server wins the point.

That way the server has to concentrate on making a high percentage of unattackable serves. And the returner must concentrate on punishing the return because any return that doesn't win the point outright is a failure.

J

Wow.

I tried this drill with a friend today. It was a terrific drill!

My practice partner has a very good serve, and she doesn't push the second serve at all. She may need to toss it five times, but when she gets the toss she wants, watch out. That made this drill very hard, as I wasn't dealing with a cupcake second serve.

At first, I just returned the serve with a lot of pace. This did not work at all. All she had to do to win the point was get it back. No, I was going to have to go for a clean winner.

Then I tried standing in very close and trying to volley/block the ball back quickly and take away her time. This worked great. Every time I made good contact I won the point. Trouble was, I whiffed or framed as many as I made, and she aced me wide once.

Then I tried imitating Fernando Verdasco. I stood a foot behind the baseline and split-stepped forward onto the baseline like he does. Then I hit the ball as hard as I could with my FH to the deuce sideline. I won the almost point every time. Trouble is, I can't do it well with my BH, so if I couldn't run around it, I couldn't hit a winner.

I liked the drill, though. I was surprised how often I double-faulted for no good reason. . . . . .

J011yroger
05-15-2009, 05:48 PM
^^^ If you keep at it, what you are going to do is find your four contact points. The one for the dtl/isi, and short angle cross/iso for the FH and BH. Once you know where your contact points are for those 4 shots, and you can read the ball coming in, then you just need to get the racquet to that point, and you are set.

When you start the drill, it is easier to have one person serve for an entire game to 7 and then switch servers for the next game. This lets the server get into a nice groove. Then when you want to make it challenging, you switch servers after every point. Or you can do volleyball scoring for fun.

Glad you liked it. I love doing that drill with the juniors, and they hate doing it with me.

J

maverick66
05-15-2009, 07:00 PM
Cindy even when you miss some of those shots its still a good thing. You put it in there head that your gonna be aggresive on there second serve. This puts pressure on there first serve and big pressure on there second. Dont worry if you miss one because the message is being sent that your gonna attack anything weak. Obviously if your missing alot take something off of your return and put it in play but i always liked to really rip the first second serve i saw to let my opponent know anything weak was gonna be attacked hard.

J011yroger
05-15-2009, 07:16 PM
^^^ Playing dubs has really sharpened up my situational returning. Knowing when you need to just focus, find your spot, and get the ball in play, and when to unload on one.

In singles, I am more blast away with my returns, but the lesson is carrying over a bit.

J

maverick66
05-15-2009, 07:46 PM
Thats why i encouraged every junior i ever met to enter dubs tournies. Your returns get so much better as there is much more pressure on your return in dubs. I used to poke a few crosscourt to start and then rip one as hard as i can right at the net player. Get them to back off a little and get them to stay honest.

J011yroger
05-15-2009, 07:50 PM
I love to belt one at the net guy when he is dancing around like a jackass and fake poaching. I usually say something like "Hey, you looked like you wanted to get involved in the point."

J

Cindysphinx
05-16-2009, 08:57 AM
The one for the dtl/isi, and short angle cross/iso for the FH and BH. Once you know where your contact points are for those 4 shots, and you can read the ball coming in, then you just need to get the racquet to that point, and you are set.

I'm trying to figure out which of these is the high-percentage shot.

Say I am in the ad court and the weak second serve is coming to my BH. Should I take that DTL, or should I take it crosscourt?

Also, is it better to stand in or take it behind the baseline? In other words, if I'm just a 3.5 player, does it make sense to take it on the rise?

When you start the drill, it is easier to have one person serve for an entire game to 7 and then switch servers for the next game. This lets the server get into a nice groove. Then when you want to make it challenging, you switch servers after every point. Or you can do volleyball scoring for fun.

We had someone serve until they won the game, winning by two. It would have been harder to get in a groove and get some good reps if we switched back and forth, I think.

[/QUOTE]

maverick66
05-16-2009, 02:56 PM
if your standing inside the court i would go dtl and follow it to the net. this is a more aggresive play that will put all the pressure on the server. this is the one you are taking on the rise. and yes 3.5 players should try to take the ball on the rise here and there. you gotta learn sometime how to do it so might as well start now.

if you are standing behind the baseline take it cross court. if you go dtl with a ball where you are behind the baseline or out of position you give up way to much court. all they have to do is flick the ball cross court and you are scrambling.

J011yroger
05-17-2009, 07:50 AM
I'm trying to figure out which of these is the high-percentage shot.

Say I am in the ad court and the weak second serve is coming to my BH. Should I take that DTL, or should I take it crosscourt?

Also, is it better to stand in or take it behind the baseline? In other words, if I'm just a 3.5 player, does it make sense to take it on the rise?



Neither of them is a high percentage shot, the lame 2nd serve allows you to hit a lower percentage shot with a larger chance of success.

The high percentage shot is to send the ball back exactly the way it came, just punch it deep cross court.

Now if you feel that you can attack the serve I would expect that the ladies you are playing have shakier backhands, so if you could take it cross court, and put a little more angle on it so that your opponent would have to take a few steps and hit a BH.

DTL is nice if the opponent has a suspect BH and cheats over to cover it, so you burn them DTL.

With reguard to the taking on the rise, I can't tell without seeing the serves you are facing. If they are lolipops, taking it on the rise does nothing, let it peak, and crack the thing. If they have some pace and kick on them, then taking on the rise is valid. I can't imagine 3.5 ladies league 2nd serves having enough steam on them to make taking on the rise a worthwhile venture. I suspect you would lose more points making errors than gain by shorthopping the return.

J