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joe sch
05-12-2009, 08:05 AM
Allen Fox was a top player in the 1960s, and is now known as a great coach and writer. Allen won the 1960 (NCAA) doubles (with Larry Nagler who also won the singles title) title for UCLA and the next year, 1961, won the NCAA singles title. It was really tough to make a living as a tennis pro in the early 1960s so Allen went back to UCLA where he obtained a Ph.D. in psychology, which helped him to write some of the best psychological tennis books. A few of the best known include Think to Win: The Strategic Dimension of Tennis, If I'm The Better Player, Why Can't I Win?, and his most recent book The Winner's Mind: A Competitor's Guide to Sports and Business Success.

What I think was Allens biggest tennis championship is 1966 Championship of Pacific Southwest in Los Angeles, which Im calling the Fox Slam. The "Fox Slam" is a play on words based on todays "Serena Slam". Allen Fox won this tournament beating Manuel Santana aka "Manolo" Santana, Fred Stolle, Tony Roche, and Roy Emerson in the finals.

I think this maybe a historic win as the only time that a player won a tournament beating the four "slam" wininers for the same year (Austrailian, Wimbledon, French, USO). Can anybody else confirm or deny this win as being a unique tennis accomplishment ?

Another interesting part of this history is that Fox rode his motorcycle each day from UCLA, where he was a grad student, to the Los Angeles Tennis Club.

Joe

Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_Fox

A.J. Sim
05-12-2009, 01:13 PM
Joe, you are indeed correct. In 1966, Santana won Wimbledon, Emerson won the Australian, Stolle won the US Open, and Roche won the French.

What an amazing feat that Fox beat all 4 of them in one tournament. I'm not sure if something like this has ever been done again.

I read Think to Win awhile back and thought it was a great tennis book. Fox certainly does has a great tennis mind. In addition to what you wrote, Fox coached the men's tennis team at Pepperdine, where he coached another great tennis mind, Brad Gilbert.

AndrewD
05-12-2009, 07:47 PM
What an amazing feat that Fox beat all 4 of them in one tournament. I'm not sure if something like this has ever been done again.

Actually, whoever beat Laver, Budge, Court, Connolly and Graf after they won their Grand Slams would have done the same thing.

joe sch
05-12-2009, 09:16 PM
Actually, whoever beat Laver, Budge, Court, Connolly and Graf after they won their Grand Slams would have done the same thing.

Nope. It would have needed to be in the same tournament, same year, and beat those 4 champions in succession in a tournament after the USO *and* before the end of the year. This would obviously require 4 different slam championship winners for the given year. Not beat one grand champion sometime afterward. Big difference.

AndrewD
05-12-2009, 09:34 PM
Nope. It would have needed to be in the same tournament, same year, and beat those 4 champions in succession in a tournament after the USO *and* before the end of the year. This would obviously require 4 different slam championship winners for the given year. Not beat one grand champion sometime afterward. Big difference.

I was only joking BUT it is the same thing. You mightn't have beaten four different people to do it but you still beat all of the people who won that year's majors.

joe sch
05-12-2009, 09:44 PM
I was only joking BUT it is the same thing. You mightn't have beaten four different people to do it but you still beat all of the people who won that year's majors.

I guess if you could beat the grand slam winner in the same year after the USO and beat him 4 times in the same tournament then it would be close to the same thing :) Still, to defeat 4 diff slam winners, in the same year, at the same tournament, is hard to believe.

gpt
05-20-2009, 03:16 AM
Thank you joe sch for this post. Any way you look at it, Fox's achievement in this tournament is both unique and exceptional. I was not aware of it and am glad you let me know. Does Allen Fox have anything to do with Fox tennis racquets?

urban
05-20-2009, 11:04 AM
In Forbes' Summers book are some humorous stories abot Fox, who had a psychological or even psychoanalytical approach to tennis. For example, he was reasonning deeply about 'choking', but could never solve the problem for himself. He was always suprised, that some people like Gonzales never choked, and even more, that people like Hoad or Laver actually did choke, but won anyway. His analytical approach stood in sharp contrast to the more intuitive and philosophical approach by Guru Torben Ulrich. I think Ulrich came nearer to exploring the hidden secrets of tennis.

joe sch
05-22-2009, 06:14 AM
In Forbes' Summers book are some humorous stories abot Fox, who had a psychological or even psychoanalytical approach to tennis. For example, he was reasonning deeply about 'choking', but could never solve the problem for himself. He was always suprised, that some people like Gonzales never choked, and even more, that people like Hoad or Laver actually did choke, but won anyway. His analytical approach stood in sharp contrast to the more intuitive and philosophical approach by Guru Torben Ulrich. I think Ulrich came nearer to exploring the hidden secrets of tennis.

Urban, It is interesting that Fox was the most accomplished player/scholar, ie top 10, phd, and Ulrich and Gallwey probably bettered uncovered the keys to choking and avoiding choking. I beleive the ability is to "let go" like preached in Inner Tennis. Guess that tournament proved that Fox was capable of beating anybody in the world as he beat the 4 slam champions in the same tournament in succession. It also shows that it was not at the highest pressure level, a slam tournament, and that he was comfortable at his "home" courts with less pressure.

Joe

tennizen1
03-24-2010, 02:39 PM
Allen Fox has his own site now: AllenFoxTennis.net. Maybe you can send him a note and get the answers direct from the source?

hoodjem
03-24-2010, 03:22 PM
Actually, whoever beat Laver, Budge, Court, Connolly and Graf after they won their Grand Slams would have done the same thing.That would be quite a tournament: mixed seniors and mixed genders.

Don't Let It Bounce
03-24-2010, 03:29 PM
His analytical approach stood in sharp contrast to the more intuitive and philosophical approach by Guru Torben Ulrich. I think Ulrich came nearer to exploring the hidden secrets of tennis.Has Ulrich written on management of mind/emotions in tennis? I'm unable to find anything by him, but I'd be interested.