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dancraig
05-18-2009, 05:51 PM
In general, what national standing number would a junior player need to have a chance for a college scholarship at any level? Would a boy in the 14's with a USTA national standing of about 500 have a shot? Thanks.

10isDad
05-18-2009, 06:46 PM
I would say a boy in the 14's with a ranking in the 500s has a chance of getting injured, a chance of losing interest in the game, a chance of getting much better and a chance of not improving very much. Sorry - way too vague a question.

If the boy in question is determined, fairly capable, has the financial means to afford good coaching and to afford to travel around playing national tournaments, stays relatively injury free, doesn't get sidetracked by other things (girls, school, life in general), that boy might improve significantly enough to get something. Thing to remember, however, is a male tennis player has a much better shot of getting academic money than they do of getting much in the way of significant athletic money.

dancraig
05-18-2009, 07:14 PM
So, is a 14 year old with a USTA standing of about 500 generally considered college scholarship material?

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
05-18-2009, 07:36 PM
Are you obtuse?
How many fourteen year olds do you even know who are in college at all?:)

A nice opinion was posted that said in effect that IF this player started working their butts off with A LOT of money backing them, than maybe...
No Money, not happening.

Better to start SAVING money right now, with the same intensity toward the college goal (and if the coming double digit inflation in the next outlying years does not eat it all) You could actually enjoy your college experiance without being a slave to a team or settle for a school just so you can play.

ClarkC
05-18-2009, 07:40 PM
So, is a 14 year old with a USTA standing of about 500 generally considered college scholarship material?

No. In fact, 14 year old tennis players with a USTA standing in the top 10 are not considered college scholarship material, because they are too young to offer a scholarship to. Coaches cannot contact them at that age, according to NCAA rules, let alone offer them scholarships.

You obviously paid no attention to the other answer you got, which is disrespectful of the time spent offering you some info. Try again.

Are you asking whether a high school senior, age 18, with a USTA ranking of 500 can get a college scholarship? That would be an intelligent question that could receive good answers on this board. Yours is not a very good question as phrased. Try again, and pay attention this time.

tennismom42
05-18-2009, 08:01 PM
Short answer, yes, you can be recruited & there's still time for that. I'd say coaches make up their minds about your recruiting class between April - April of your Junior to Senior years. D1 is not the only choice. At 500, there are (a few) D1 schools that will take you. Just remember, there are 4.5 scholarships per team and at least 7 players per team. You do the math.

Long answer, since you want to do a comparison, I'll give you a comparison. My son is in the 18s, and got a scholarship to a D1 school. Personally, for me, the scholarship was a very ANTI-CLIMATIC, DISENCHANTING event. For what I spent in Jr. tennis to "buy*" that ranking, it's just not fun. Most parents' (sane ones, not like me) money is better spent not chasing rankings points.

(*You have to attend tournaments to get the rankings, often they require travel.)

Don't play tennis with the goal of getting a scholarship. The tennis JOURNEY has far more to offer than that. Do compete, do challenge your skill-set at various levels of competition, know that tennis is there for you until you're in the grave. Get the dang grades, do the HS activities, clubs. Yes, it's wonderful my son got a scholarship, but he missed out on so much more. Be a well-rounded person (grades, friends, HS clubs, job, volunteering, other activities). Tennis will always be there for you. Look at all the goals

dancraig
05-18-2009, 08:12 PM
Short answer, yes, you can be recruited & there's still time for that. I'd say coaches make up their minds about your recruiting class between April - April of your Junior to Senior years. D1 is not the only choice. At 500, there are (a few) D1 schools that will take you. Just remember, there are 4.5 scholarships per team and at least 7 players per team. You do the math.

Long answer, since you want to do a comparison, I'll give you a comparison. My son is in the 18s, and got a scholarship to a D1 school. Personally, for me, the scholarship was a very ANTI-CLIMATIC, DISENCHANTING event. For what I spent in Jr. tennis to "buy*" that ranking, it's just not fun. Most parents' (sane ones, not like me) money is better spent not chasing rankings points.

(*You have to attend tournaments to get the rankings, often they require travel.)

Don't play tennis with the goal of getting a scholarship. The tennis JOURNEY has far more to offer than that. Do compete, do challenge your skill-set at various levels of competition, know that tennis is there for you until you're in the grave. Get the dang grades, do the HS activities, clubs. Yes, it's wonderful my son got a scholarship, but he missed out on so much more. Be a well-rounded person (grades, friends, HS clubs, job, volunteering, other activities). Tennis will always be there for you. Look at all the goals

Thank-you.
So if he maintains his standing, he's got a shot. Great!

TennisTaxi
05-18-2009, 08:17 PM
Don't listen to all those junior coaches who promise results and guarantee scholarship money. Unless you are in the top 25 of the 18's your son will not be getting much $$ and the way the economy is going, by the time he is in college who knows how many college teams will have vanished by then. Tennis is not a money making sport for colleges and they would rather spend their money elsewhere. If you are lucky, you will get a split of a scholarship 1/4 maybe.

I wish we had taken all the $$ we had spent on chasing national points, travel, academies and put into a college fund; in the long run that would have been a wiser decision. But looking back, if we had to do it over again, I still would have and don't regret it for a moment! My son would have lost out on an amazing junior tennis experience; he has seen the US, can navigate the world on his own, has met and made friends with kids from all over the country and all walks of life, matured from competition and can handle himself in most situations....far more mature than some kid who jusy spent 4 normal years in high school.

But...no not expect this adventure to equal scholarships, it will cost you a lot more than you will get in the long run!!

Good luck to you...and enjoy the experience!!

dancraig
05-18-2009, 08:37 PM
Don't listen to all those junior coaches who promise results and guarantee scholarship money. Unless you are in the top 25 of the 18's your son will not be getting much $$ and the way the economy is going, by the time he is in college who knows how many college teams will have vanished by then. Tennis is not a money making sport for colleges and they would rather spend their money elsewhere. If you are lucky, you will get a split of a scholarship 1/4 maybe.

I wish we had taken all the $$ we had spent on chasing national points, travel, academies and put into a college fund; in the long run that would have been a wiser decision. But looking back, if we had to do it over again, I still would have and don't regret it for a moment! My son would have lost out on an amazing junior tennis experience; he has seen the US, can navigate the world on his own, has met and made friends with kids from all over the country and all walks of life, matured from competition and can handle himself in most situations....far more mature than some kid who jusy spent 4 normal years in high school.

But...no not expect this adventure to equal scholarships, it will cost you a lot more than you will get in the long run!!

Good luck to you...and enjoy the experience!!

Thanks for your answer.
I have taught for decades, but still wanted some insight into the current correalation between USTA national standings and college scholarship chances. I understand things have really changed in the past 15-20 years, with more foreign players getting the slots.

10isDad
05-19-2009, 02:53 AM
Thank-you.
So if he maintains his standing, he's got a shot. Great!

Tennismom42 did NOT imply that if he "maintains his standing" he has a shot. Tennismom42's kid (the one who got the scholarship) likely did not get a full ride (can you enlighten us?) and is ranked in the top 75 nationally - very different than the 500's.

If all he does is maintain his standing, he's got a shot at playing lower echelon D-I or mid- to mid-upper echelon D-II and D-III, but relatively little shot getting athletic money. -edit- ...by lower echelon, I am NOT saying a "bad school", I'm speaking about those D-I schools that don't have a big name or a big tennis program. Look, for instance, at Longwood University. The guy who played #1 in 2007/8 & #2 this year was ranked around 220. They have a guy who was around 500 playing at #4/5 singles. Many people, however, have never heard of Longwood University so that's what I'm calling a lower-echelon tennis school.

You talk about wanting a correlation between ranking and scholarship opportunities. Relatively few male players get a full ride. Many who do are either foreign players or are extremely highly ranked players. Scholarship money may exist for players ranked within the top 150 and perhaps lower, but it doesn't compare to the amount of money that can be available if the boy gets top grades. He has a better chance getting on a tennis team if he gets amazing grades, therefore doesn't need athletic money. Notice I did not say "play on a tennis team", I said a chance of getting on a tennis team. With only 4.5 scholarships available and a minimum of 6 guys on a team, hopefully you can see why full rides are rare in men's tennis. Most D-I teams have 8 or more guys on the team. The coach gets to decide how to divvy up the money. He/she may divide it somewhat equally among the players (top 6), or may decide to give a full ride or two and divide up the remaining money so a player may get 10% or 15% or 20%, etc.

-edit- and just as a reminder, just because 4.5 scholarships are allowed doesn't mean every D-I and D-II tennis team has 4.5 scholarships to give out. It's just the upper limit. We received some documentation from a D-I school (non-Ivy) where they flat out said up front they do not give out athletic scholarships for tennis.

tennismom42
05-19-2009, 06:16 AM
Thank-you.
So if he maintains his standing, he's got a shot. Great!
If he maintains his standings, he has a slim shot. He would need to continue to improve his rankings to ensure it. I don't want to deceive you! Take a look at some of the D1 schools. Some of them are in QUITE remote locations, including farming towns. Will parent & child be content with a $1000 scholarship at a farming town? That is a reality. For the class of 2009, I can think of only 2 full-ride scholarships. (That's 2 kids out of 2500, mine is not one of them, of course.) The value of his scholarship, for one year, could fit 5 times into the amount I spent on tennis in the past 4 years.

DII is great as well, much better chances and a better quality of college life. DIII gives academic scholarships. Many D3 schools can & do beat D1 schools.

Grampy
05-25-2009, 10:05 AM
I played college tennis with a scholarship and never had a national ranking. I did have a state ranking (nothing impressive though). I believe in boys 18's I was around 10 in the state. It was over 15 yrs ago, so I don't remember for sure.

Now if you are talking D1 school scholarship, thats a different story. I played Junior college tennis then D2.

SoCalDominates
05-25-2009, 07:18 PM
im around 150 in the country in 16s and was told if i kept it up in the 18s i could go to many D1 schools but get scholarship money at very few

SoCalDominates
05-25-2009, 07:20 PM
Tennismom42 did NOT imply that if he "maintains his standing" he has a shot. Tennismom42's kid (the one who got the scholarship) likely did not get a full ride (can you enlighten us?) and is ranked in the top 75 nationally - very different than the 500's.

If all he does is maintain his standing, he's got a shot at playing lower echelon D-I or mid- to mid-upper echelon D-II and D-III, but relatively little shot getting athletic money. -edit- ...by lower echelon, I am NOT saying a "bad school", I'm speaking about those D-I schools that don't have a big name or a big tennis program. Look, for instance, at Longwood University. The guy who played #1 in 2007/8 & #2 this year was ranked around 220. They have a guy who was around 500 playing at #4/5 singles. Many people, however, have never heard of Longwood University so that's what I'm calling a lower-echelon tennis school.

You talk about wanting a correlation between ranking and scholarship opportunities. Relatively few male players get a full ride. Many who do are either foreign players or are extremely highly ranked players. Scholarship money may exist for players ranked within the top 150 and perhaps lower, but it doesn't compare to the amount of money that can be available if the boy gets top grades. He has a better chance getting on a tennis team if he gets amazing grades, therefore doesn't need athletic money. Notice I did not say "play on a tennis team", I said a chance of getting on a tennis team. With only 4.5 scholarships available and a minimum of 6 guys on a team, hopefully you can see why full rides are rare in men's tennis. Most D-I teams have 8 or more guys on the team. The coach gets to decide how to divvy up the money. He/she may divide it somewhat equally among the players (top 6), or may decide to give a full ride or two and divide up the remaining money so a player may get 10% or 15% or 20%, etc.

-edit- and just as a reminder, just because 4.5 scholarships are allowed doesn't mean every D-I and D-II tennis team has 4.5 scholarships to give out. It's just the upper limit. We received some documentation from a D-I school (non-Ivy) where they flat out said up front they do not give out athletic scholarships for tennis.

Dont be hatin on Longwood lol jk My dad played tennis there. They have some famous people from there. I think they have one NFL player lol how do you know about Longwood

eeytennis
05-26-2009, 12:10 PM
I would say a boy in the 14's with a ranking in the 500s has a chance of getting injured, a chance of losing interest in the game, a chance of getting much better and a chance of not improving very much. Sorry - way too vague a question.

If the boy in question is determined, fairly capable, has the financial means to afford good coaching and to afford to travel around playing national tournaments, stays relatively injury free, doesn't get sidetracked by other things (girls, school, life in general), that boy might improve significantly enough to get something. Thing to remember, however, is a male tennis player has a much better shot of getting academic money than they do of getting much in the way of significant athletic money.

Yup this is really true. As i have said before however is that there are varying levels of different schools. i know a few people who got scholarships to D1 schools and they aren't BAD, but they definitely weren't top ranked national players at the time of recruitment. One girl i know was ranked in the 900s i believe by the USTA and she got a scholarship to a Big East school...so you know, just keep working hard, tournaments definitely help. Good luck!

fuggy
05-26-2009, 03:37 PM
Aren't tennis scholarships based on current, not past performance? That means, one sprained ankle and the university will take back the scholarship?

miniRafa386
05-26-2009, 04:08 PM
im around 150 in the country in 16s and was told if i kept it up in the 18s i could go to many D1 schools but get scholarship money at very few

bingo. D1 tennis is good, but getting onto some D1 teams isnt that hard. infact, some D3 schools are tougher to make than D1. but yea, top 150-200 could go play D1, maybe even top 300. heck if youre a good player who doesnt play tournaments, you could possibly go D1.