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View Full Version : More US commentators than US players at R. Garros!


tenis
05-26-2009, 07:46 PM
Seriously, let's just counting....but I can't, it's a way toooooomany of them on Tennis Channel and ESPN, IMO much, much more than players (especially first rounds...).
What a broadcast we have to absorb, full of personal opinions, judging and statements, they make simple thinks difficult, it's NOT fun anymore. Thanks for the MUTE button! And by the way, why is the screen on ESPN not full?
I'm not surprised, tennis is sinking in the US...
(I don't want be negative, but that's reality!)

vsbabolat
05-26-2009, 07:50 PM
Seriously, let's just counting....but I can't, it's a way toooooomany of them on Tennis Channel and ESPN, IMO much, much more than players (especially first rounds...).
What a broadcast we have to absorb, full of personal opinions, judging and statements, they make simple thinks difficult, it's NOT fun anymore. Thanks for the MUTE button! And by the way, why is the screen on ESPN not full?
I'm not surprised, tennis is sinking in the US...
(I don't want be negative, but that's reality!)

Yeah I was watching ESPN2 in HD and I am thinking why is my screen so small? ESPN just clutters up the screen with the crawl at the bottom of the screen, the score that takes up the full width of the screen, and two boxes that takes up the side of the screen. What the **** is ESPN doing!?!?

Commando Tennis Shorts
05-26-2009, 08:00 PM
The U.S. has two players in the men's top 15. What other country can top that?

tenis
05-26-2009, 08:12 PM
The U.S. has two players in the men's top 15. What other country can top that?

Sorry, but you didn't get my message!!!

vsbabolat
05-26-2009, 08:43 PM
The U.S. has two players in the men's top 15. What other country can top that?

You have from ESPN Chris Fowler, Patrick McEnroe, Pam Shriver, Mary Joe Fernadez, Cliff Drysdale, Dick Enberg, Brad Gilbert, Darrin Cahill, and Mary Corillo. Did I miss anyone? so a total of 9 talking heads that won't shut-up so you can enjoy the tennis.

From the TC you have Ian Eagle, Barry McKay, Corrina Moriarru, Justin Gimmlstob, John McEnroe, Tim Robbins, Leif Shiras, Katrina Adams, Martina Navratilova, and Bill Macatee. That is 10 talking head that won't shut-up.

Between the two networks you have a total of 19 talking heads.

I remember back in the day when it was on original ESPN and you had just Mary Carillo (she was not so annoying back then), Cliff Drysdale, and Fred Stolle. They were on from 9:00 AM EDT to when that last ball was struck for the day. They did not show taped matches only live!!

Commando Tennis Shorts
05-26-2009, 09:20 PM
Oops, put my post in the wrong thread. Meant to put it in the one about America not having top players anymore. Apologies

tenis
05-26-2009, 09:57 PM
You have from ESPN Chris Fowler, Patrick McEnroe, Pam Shriver, Mary Joe Fernadez, Cliff Drysdale, Dick Enberg, Brad Gilbert, Darrin Cahill, and Mary Corillo. Did I miss anyone? so a total of 9 talking heads that won't shut-up so you can enjoy the tennis.

From the TC you have Ian Eagle, Barry McKay, Corrina Moriarru, Justin Gimmlstob, John McEnroe, Tim Robbins, Leif Shiras, Katrina Adams, Martina Navratilova, and Bill Macatee. That is 10 talking head that won't shut-up.

Between the two networks you have a total of 19 talking heads.

I remember back in the day when it was on original ESPN and you had just Mary Carillo (she was not so annoying back then), Cliff Drysdale, and Fred Stolle. They were on from 9:00 AM EDT to when that last ball was struck for the day. They did not show taped matches only live!!

YES, that's exactly what's make me sick!!!

sh@de
05-26-2009, 10:01 PM
You have from ESPN Chris Fowler, Patrick McEnroe, Pam Shriver, Mary Joe Fernadez, Cliff Drysdale, Dick Enberg, Brad Gilbert, Darrin Cahill, and Mary Corillo. Did I miss anyone? so a total of 9 talking heads that won't shut-up so you can enjoy the tennis.

From the TC you have Ian Eagle, Barry McKay, Corrina Moriarru, Justin Gimmlstob, John McEnroe, Tim Robbins, Leif Shiras, Katrina Adams, Martina Navratilova, and Bill Macatee. That is 10 talking head that won't shut-up.

Between the two networks you have a total of 19 talking heads.

I remember back in the day when it was on original ESPN and you had just Mary Carillo (she was not so annoying back then), Cliff Drysdale, and Fred Stolle. They were on from 9:00 AM EDT to when that last ball was struck for the day. They did not show taped matches only live!!

HAHAH that is funny. So many talking heads which won't shut up LOL.

rfprse
05-27-2009, 01:31 PM
You have from ESPN Chris Fowler, Patrick McEnroe, Pam Shriver, Mary Joe Fernadez, Cliff Drysdale, Dick Enberg, Brad Gilbert, Darrin Cahill, and Mary Corillo. Did I miss anyone? so a total of 9 talking heads that won't shut-up so you can enjoy the tennis.

From the TC you have Ian Eagle, Barry McKay, Corrina Moriarru, Justin Gimmlstob, John McEnroe, Tim Robbins, Leif Shiras, Katrina Adams, Martina Navratilova, and Bill Macatee. That is 10 talking head that won't shut-up.

Between the two networks you have a total of 19 talking heads.


Exactly.

And here comes one more, Renee Stubbs on Tennis Channel.
She couldn't stop talking during Safin-Ouanna match. Another idiotic addition to the poor group of "commentators".

I don't need nor want talk shows... I want to watch tennis!

sureshs
05-27-2009, 01:39 PM
What prevents anyone from watching the picture and hitting the mute button? The viewpoints make it interesting. Otherwise it is just bashing balls back and forth. I like hearing from knowledgeable people about the game. Same reason why I read tennis magazines. It gives me more knowledge.

rfprse
05-27-2009, 01:43 PM
What prevents anyone from watching the picture and hitting the mute button? The viewpoints make it interesting. Otherwise it is just bashing balls back and forth. I like hearing from knowledgeable people about the game. Same reason why I read tennis magazines. It gives me more knowledge.

To hear the sound of the shots.
Knowledge to one can be cliche or garbage to another.

myservenow
05-27-2009, 01:54 PM
Yes, to hear the sound of the shots and the crowd reactions. If you subscribe to the online tennis tv site, you sometimes have the option of watching the matches without commentary. It is pure heaven, really. The points speak for themselves.

The problem with the influx of all of these modern day commentators is that they all think they have to be saying something ground-breaking every chance they get to speak. That is why a few years back everyone of them had already proclaimed Federer the greatest ever. That is why the same ones are now saying that Nadal is the greatest ever. There is no true meaning behind anything that they say anymore. It is all drivel and fluff designed to prevent dead air on the broadcast. Mind you, these commentators think highly of everything they say, but it is all mindless these days.

If you haven't read that recent interview (posted somewhere on this message board) with Ivan Lendel, it is really, really worth your time. If Lendel ruled the tennis world, there would be play by play from the broadcast booth and no opinion whatsoever. I could handle that. As Lendel says, tell me the facts and I'll form my own opinion.

Bhagi Katbamna
05-27-2009, 02:06 PM
I really enjoyed Fred Stolle and Cliff Drysdale together.

tonyg11
05-27-2009, 02:42 PM
i like both Patrick and John McEnroe for their actuall candit tennis insight. The rest are a waste of space.

tenis
05-27-2009, 04:32 PM
What prevents anyone from watching the picture and hitting the mute button? The viewpoints make it interesting. Otherwise it is just bashing balls back and forth. I like hearing from knowledgeable people about the game. Same reason why I read tennis magazines. It gives me more knowledge.

Maybe you like a lot "entertainment today" or simillar kind of program. If you'll like more knowledge and education, you're on totally wrong site! There is a lot trash talking w. nonsense.

Tennis360
05-27-2009, 07:09 PM
apparently, the French Open is not the main goal for US players, at least according to James Blake:

"For the Americans, a lot of times, this isn't our main goal of the year. Ours is generally Wimbledon and the U.S. Open,'' Blake said.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/tennis/wires/05/26/3000.ap.ten.french.open.notebook.0801/index.html

tenis
05-27-2009, 08:47 PM
apparently, the French Open is not the main goal for US players, at least according to James Blake:

"For the Americans, a lot of times, this isn't our main goal of the year. Ours is generally Wimbledon and the U.S. Open,'' Blake said.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/tennis/wires/05/26/3000.ap.ten.french.open.notebook.0801/index.html

Maybe it's the "main goal" just for the US commentators??????

sureshs
05-28-2009, 05:35 AM
Without their "nonsense," even fewer will watch tennis on TV. Would you all like broadcasts to be canceled? The networks have to be forced to show tennis in the US. The average viewer is not listening to the sound of the shots, but to some gossip about Sharapova or Serena. I can assure you that you will not become a better club player by listening to the tennis sounds on TV either. TV needs some drama to get the people watching tennis, which is a boring game to watch to tell the truth, otherwise they would be switching channels in a second.

WillAlwaysLoveYouTennis
05-28-2009, 07:01 AM
Yes, I noticed that during the Safin match. Too bad you don't hear the other commentators ask the other one to be quiet as its during the rally now, or either as Navratilova has done on a number of occasions say (if she was asked a question before someone was about to serve), "I'll reply to that after this point..."

Since I don't follow "outside" tennis news except on a few players I know, certainly not the way I used to (I used to have subscriptions to as many mags and newsfeeds I could to get as close to total info as possible), now I do enjoy to hear some relevant "tid bits" or information about players as the match progresses, but NOT during the rallies. There is well and enough time for them to insert some info elsewhere.

I think many viewers have short attention spans because too many are used to the "in your face" crap so many networks spew. Overstimulation. Its unfortunate but simply a part of that "tv head revolution" that commentators and their directors feel the need to act like "pull my string" motor mouths to keep viewers.

jetlee2k
05-28-2009, 08:25 AM
To hear the sound of the shots.
Knowledge to one can be cliche or garbage to another.

Well SAID.. !! US has no good players so to compensate that, they'll ask the US Commentators to beat our ear drums to death with bias, personal opinion which has nothing to do with the match is going on.. it SUCKS

jetlee2k
05-28-2009, 08:28 AM
apparently, the French Open is not the main goal for US players, at least according to James Blake:

"For the Americans, a lot of times, this isn't our main goal of the year. Ours is generally Wimbledon and the U.S. Open,'' Blake said.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/tennis/wires/05/26/3000.ap.ten.french.open.notebook.0801/index.html

I read this too.. what a head case.. !! if you don't do well, change your game plan, change your preparation & learn how to play on it rather give such a wussie answer.. same thing as for Fish too.. these guys got no fighting spirits.

tenis
05-28-2009, 08:31 AM
I read this too.. what a head case.. !! if you don't do well, change your game plan, change your preparation & learn how to play on it rather give such a wussie answer.. same thing as for Fish too.. these guys got no fighting spirits.
....or stay at home!

jamesblakefan#1
05-28-2009, 08:51 AM
I'm watching TTC and Gimelstob just brought up Mayer's mullet on a big point in the match. Great analysis.

vsbabolat
05-28-2009, 09:35 AM
Without their "nonsense," even fewer will watch tennis on TV. Would you all like broadcasts to be canceled? The networks have to be forced to show tennis in the US. The average viewer is not listening to the sound of the shots, but to some gossip about Sharapova or Serena. I can assure you that you will not become a better club player by listening to the tennis sounds on TV either. TV needs some drama to get the people watching tennis, which is a boring game to watch to tell the truth, otherwise they would be switching channels in a second.

Really the Tennis Channel is being forced to show the French Open.:shock: When you watch Golf those announcers and analyst are not annoying and obnoxious like in tennis. Or are the networks being forced to show Golf as well? Barry McKay thinks he is on radio. During the point he likes to call out the types of shots being hit like drop shot, serve down the tee, it's good and so on....

You think tennis is boring to watch:shock:. Then maybe you should not watch tennis then. I found the Safin vs. Ouanna absolutely riveting! I found the Federer vs. Acosuso match today highly entertaining and Murray vs. Starace entertaining as well just to name a few. The problem is networks like ESPN like to show Roddick run though someone. Or some bad women's match that is horribly one sided instead of a very exciting 5th set tennis match that has lots of drama. You don't need to fake it by talking gossip or nonsense that has nothing to do with the match being watched.

IvanYentl
05-28-2009, 09:39 AM
The problem with the influx of all of these modern day commentators is that they all think they have to be saying something ground-breaking every chance they get to speak. That is why a few years back everyone of them had already proclaimed Federer the greatest ever. That is why the same ones are now saying that Nadal is the greatest ever. There is no true meaning behind anything that they say anymore. It is all drivel and fluff designed to prevent dead air on the broadcast. Mind you, these commentators think highly of everything they say, but it is all mindless these days.



I agree with this -- if by modern day you mean Morairu, Gimelslob and their ilk. Martina is one of my personal favorites. She hones in on the technical details, which I really appreciate. It is enjoyable for me to hear her explain mistakes in mechanics and I love it when she borderline-mocks lazy players for their poor technique. Everyone who wishes to learn to play better should listen to Martina.

The gold standard of lousy, useless commentary is represented by Stubbs -- as noted earlier in this thread -- when she popped in the booth during the Safin match. Her commentary was so full of cliches and she simply would not stop repeating herself. It was horrific.

sureshs
05-28-2009, 09:44 AM
Really the Tennis Channel is being forced to show the French Open.:shock: When you watch Golf those announcers and analyst are not annoying and obnoxious like in tennis. Or are the networks being forced to show Golf as well? Barry McKay thinks he is on radio. During the point he likes to call out the types of shots being hit like drop shot, serve down the tee, it's good and so on....

You think tennis is boring to watch:shock:. Then maybe you should not watch tennis then. I found the Safin vs. Ouanna absolutely riveting! I found the Federer vs. Acosuso match today highly entertaining and Murray vs. Starace entertaining as well just to name a few. The problem is networks like ESPN like to show Roddick run though someone. Or some bad women's match that is horribly one sided instead of a very exciting 5th set tennis match that has lots of drama. You don't need to fake it by talking gossip or nonsense that has nothing to do with the match being watched.

Networks don't have to be forced to show golf. Even basic hotels which cater to salesmen on the go include golf channel in their limited number of channels on room TV. Popularity of golf is far higher than tennis in the US, and tennis resorts are being converted to golf resorts. If you take a purist view, that is bad for the future of tennis viewing. Many viewers watch tennis only during the Slams. They need to reminded what has happened since the last Slam, who the heroes and villains are. US audiences in particular have an appetite for hearing about underdog achievements, so something about Ivanovic hitting in a dried swimming pool or Sharapova coming back after injuries has to be aired.

IvanYentl
05-28-2009, 09:44 AM
Maybe you like a lot "entertainment today" or simillar kind of program. If you'll like more knowledge and education, you're on totally wrong site! There is a lot trash talking w. nonsense.

You're over-generalizing. Yes, there are some terrible commentators, incl Morairu and Gimelslob. But Navratilova is one of the best. She breaks down the technical details and this is always useful for me. She may be a bit too clinical at times, but the pros outweigh the cons.

Depends what you are looking for in a broadcast. Some want nothing but silence. Some (like me) enjoy listening to former players like Navratilova who know what they're talking about and aren't afraid to criticize. Unfortunately, there is more fluff than technical discussion in the booth, this is a sad reality.

Morairu and Gimelslob should be sent home on the same plane and be forced to sit next to each other.

vsbabolat
05-28-2009, 09:51 AM
Networks don't have to be forced to show golf. Even basic hotels which cater to salesmen on the go include golf channel in their limited number of channels on room TV. Popularity of golf is far higher than tennis in the US, and tennis resorts are being converted to golf resorts. If you take a purist view, that is bad for the future of tennis viewing. Many viewers watch tennis only during the Slams. They need to reminded what has happened since the last Slam, who the heroes and villains are. US audiences in particular have an appetite for hearing about underdog achievements, so something about Ivanovic hitting in a dried swimming pool or Sharapova coming back after injuries has to be aired.

You just like to make up B.S.:-?


Tennis rally: Participation on the upswing in the USA
By Douglas Robson, Special for USA TODAY
Tennis is rallying once again. According to a new survey scheduled for release Thursday, tennis participation in the USA grew to nearly 27 million in 2008, the highest figure in 15 years.
That's still a far cry from the "Tennis Anyone?" heyday of the 1970s, when numbers regularly registered above 30 million. But it signals a positive trend after years of falling or flat growth, including a 12% increase in player participation during the past five years and 7% in 2008.

"We think we have some momentum going, even in this economy," says Kurt Kamperman, chief executive of community tennis for the USTA, which conducted the study in conjunction with the Tennis Industry Association (TIA) and the Taylor Research Group.

Among the study's findings:

•The percentage of frequent players (more than 21 times per year) rose to 5.6 million in 2008, up 7% from 2007 and 23% from 2003

•The number of new players grew by 3% to 5.9 million

•Continuing players (those who have played more than a year) increased 9% to 15.1 million

Golf, by comparison, has seen participation remain flat at around 29 million since 2000, according to the National Golf Foundation. Rounds played have also been static and are down 1.3% through October of this year.

By contrast, play occasions in tennis have increased 33% in the past five years. Other measures, such as racket sales and ball sales, have shown positive gains over a similar five-year period.

"By almost every key metric and based on the trends the sport remains poised for growth in the coming years," Dave Haggerty, president of the TIA, said in a statement.

Longtime industry insiders say the call to arms came in 1994 when Sports Illustrated ran a cover story that asked, "Is Tennis Dead?"

"The industry galvanized," says John Embree, president of Prince in the USA and South America.

A year later, major manufacturers such as Wilson, Head and Prince began a self-assessment program to pool money to promote the sport. The USTA also gradually began to pour resources into grass-roots programs that were largely overlooked. Last year, it doled out about $40 million to 17 regional sections for local tennis activities.

Kamperman, who joined the USTA in 2003, credits USTA and industry-wide efforts to encourage and retain players for the positive trend.

Recent among them are the Tennis Welcome Centers, where new players can punch in zip codes to find lessons in their area; QuickStart tennis, a simplified format of tennis using special equipment and shorter dimensions to help children learn to play; and Cardio Tennis, a drill-based group exercise aimed at promoting the physical benefits of the sport.

He also cites a number of initiatives to bring the game back via school physical education curriculums, programs at public parks and infrastructure improvements.

The industry, meantime, has tried to break down cost barriers.

A starter racket can cost less than $40 and a can of balls still runs about $2-$3. Many of those rackets also come with a tag directing buyers to the Tennis Welcome Center website — a sign of the industry-wide cooperation.

"The reason that tennis is growing is all by design, it's not by luck," says Liza Horan, editor of tenniswire.org, a website covering the industry.

The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association's own surveys also show positive participation trends in tennis during recent years (it uses a different methodology and has not completed 2008 figures).

Mike May, a spokesman for the trade association, says the strong numbers for frequent players in the USTA/TIA report is particularly crucial and shows the hard work the industry has put in to revive the sport.

"Frequent participants are driving the sport, and if your frequent play goes down, you've got a problem," he says.

Having stars such as Andy Roddick and the Williams sisters can also play a role, but homegrown stars don't necessarily translate into bigger participation numbers, Kamperman and others say.

What has helped is repackaging of the sport away from its country club roots into a cooler, healthier sport with variety ranging from surface (clay, hard, grass) to season (indoors and outdoors) to style (singles or doubles). It can also be played within families and from childhood to old age.

"The options for play are numerous," May says.

sureshs
05-28-2009, 10:04 AM
^^^ Misleading. Golf may be down because it is expensive to play in this economy. Also, participation is not the same as viewership. Many tennis players prefer to watch other sports. Many golf fans can barely drag their fat butt out of the couch.

vsbabolat
05-28-2009, 10:28 AM
^^^ Misleading. Golf may be down because it is expensive to play in this economy. Also, participation is not the same as viewership. Many tennis players prefer to watch other sports. Many golf fans can barely drag their fat butt out of the couch.

We have been in a recession since 2000?:shock: That is a new one. Keep on rationalizing.

Golf, by comparison, has seen participation remain flat at around 29 million since 2000, according to the National Golf Foundation. Rounds played have also been static and are down 1.3% through October of this year.