PDA

View Full Version : Advice - Specific to tie-breaks


defriend
06-01-2009, 01:46 PM
Hi,

My team was the top seed last year, with a 14-2 record. In play-offs, 4 out of the 5 courts went to 3rd set tie-breaks!! We ended up loosing the match 2-3. :confused:

It could have so easily gone our way. This year we (as a team) are practicing a lot of tie-breaks. We are 6-1 half way thru the season.....

Any specific advice on tie-breaks?
- change in strategy
- approach
- go for the winner or continue the point and wait for the opponent to make a mistake..

This would be for both set and match tie-breaks....

Regards
Nick (3.0 Team Captain)

SlapShot
06-01-2009, 01:48 PM
Advice for tie-breaks? Play percentage tennis. In a game, you can drop a point but make it up by winning the game. In a breaker, that's not the case - every single point counts.

Don't go for broke unless absolutely necessary, IMO.

Kostas
06-01-2009, 01:51 PM
Jeezus what season are you only half-way through on June 1?

We're starting mixed in Southern.

As for your question I don't do anything different in tie-breaks (maybe that's bad) but we just play and try to win points.

I don't know if I would change anything about your game(s) unless you are practicing a change for the sole purpose of showing your opponents something different in an attempt to throw them off. In that respect maybe some different serve formations or something like that that you and your team can be very comfortable doing but if it's the first time your opponents see it they may not be ready.

Otherwise I would suggest just playing your best tennis.

Blask
06-01-2009, 02:07 PM
Like someone above me said, I play percentage tennis when possible. I try to make them him a decent amount of balls. A lot of times people are worn down by that point and will make some stupid mistakes or go for a premature winner and make an error.

Cindysphinx
06-01-2009, 04:32 PM
I like to try to pay special attention to positioning, applying as much pressure as possible. Your opponents will be tight. If you do things like take the net, they are very likely not to be able to conjure a good pass. If there's ever a time you want to protect the middle in doubles and mirror the ball well, this is it.

Nellie
06-01-2009, 07:02 PM
The tie-break is all about winning the first few points. If you are up, the rest of the tie-break as all down hill. If you get down, take your time! walk around, talk strategy - don't rush. Serve second serves because you don't want to give up points. Try to be aggressive and do something different (go Australian!) The tie break is fast, and the other team will often have problems to adjust to changes.

OrangePower
06-01-2009, 07:19 PM
Jeezus what season are you only half-way through on June 1?

We're starting mixed in Southern.



Dunno about the OP, but I am in Norcal and we just passed the half-way mark yesterday on our Adult season (match #8 out of 14)...

OrangePower
06-01-2009, 07:22 PM
Any specific advice on tie-breaks?
Nick (3.0 Team Captain)

In 3.0, the significant majority of points are going to end on an error rather than a winner. And as others have pointed out, one or two points in a tie-breaker can make a huge difference. So I would say shot selection and patience are key. Also, good defense - make your opponents hit the extra shot and you are likely to be rewarded...

Some have suggested being aggressive or trying different tactics (eg Australian), but I don't agree that this would pay dividends at 3.0 (as opposed to playing conservatively).

defriend
06-02-2009, 05:56 AM
In 3.0, the significant majority of points are going to end on an error rather than a winner. And as others have pointed out, one or two points in a tie-breaker can make a huge difference. So I would say shot selection and patience are key. Also, good defense - make your opponents hit the extra shot and you are likely to be rewarded...

Some have suggested being aggressive or trying different tactics (eg Australian), but I don't agree that this would pay dividends at 3.0 (as opposed to playing conservatively).

Yes.. I did notice that extending the point pays dividends most of the times... "make THEM do the mistakes".

Great advice from everybody so far... please keep them coming.

Regards
Nick

defriend
06-02-2009, 05:57 AM
Jeezus what season are you only half-way through on June 1?

We're starting mixed in Southern.

As for your question I don't do anything different in tie-breaks (maybe that's bad) but we just play and try to win points.

I don't know if I would change anything about your game(s) unless you are practicing a change for the sole purpose of showing your opponents something different in an attempt to throw them off. In that respect maybe some different serve formations or something like that that you and your team can be very comfortable doing but if it's the first time your opponents see it they may not be ready.

Otherwise I would suggest just playing your best tennis.

I am in the PA/NJ area... so it takes a wile to thaw.... and our outdoor season starts in April...

Regards
Nick

Topaz
06-02-2009, 08:13 AM
Dunno about the OP, but I am in Norcal and we just passed the half-way mark yesterday on our Adult season (match #8 out of 14)...

We are only just passed halfway through in my area as well. Match 12 out of 22.

Outdoor league isn't halfway yet, though.

ezylman
06-02-2009, 08:33 AM
Here in Texas we play year round.

As far as the tiebreak goes, play your consistent game, but don't play scared. Otherwise your will crater like Roddick did playing Monfils. Gael is a good player, but Roddick should have at least been competitive with the guy. His head wasn't in it.

Blade0324
06-05-2009, 07:27 AM
I would say pretty much play your normal game. You can get into trouble trying something different when the pressure is on. Play higher percentage tennis as you will likely be a little tight and nervous. I also think that the first 2-3 points are key. If you get up a mini break early it takes some pressure off of you and puts it on your oponent then they are likely to go for too much and give you another mini break.