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View Full Version : 3.5 - 4.0 strategy


shogun90
06-07-2009, 04:12 AM
Hello,

I'm between a 3.5 and 4.0. I'm taking a group lesson and the instructor said that at my level 80% of the points are due to unforced errors. He says we should dial it back and go @ 80% until we really have to get to ball. The question I have is, at my level would it be better to shorten my swings and use an oversized, more powerful racquet than using a midplus and swinging harder?

SteveI
06-07-2009, 04:31 AM
Hello,

I'm between a 3.5 and 4.0. I'm taking a group lesson and the instructor said that at my level 80% of the points are due to unforced errors. He says we should dial it back and go @ 80% until we really have to get to ball. The question I have is, at my level would it be better to shorten my swings and use an oversized, more powerful racquet than using a midplus and swinging harder?

Keep more balls in the court, whatever frame you use is the answer. Have a pro evaluate your game..try to improve your weaknesses and develop a weapon. Get as fit as possible. As long as the frame is not "way off" for your physical skills work on your game and fitness. Most pros will not try to move you to a new frame unless they really see your equipment selection is very poor.

Regards,
Steve

larry10s
06-07-2009, 04:40 AM
Hello,

I'm between a 3.5 and 4.0. I'm taking a group lesson and the instructor said that at my level 80% of the points are due to unforced errors. He says we should dial it back and go @ 80% until we really have to get to ball. The question I have is, at my level would it be better to shorten my swings and use an oversized, more powerful racquet than using a midplus and swinging harder?
better to use a midplus to learn better technique to go beyond 3.5 = 4.0. if thats not your goal get a more powerful racquet. either way at all levels unforced errors loses matches.

Nellie
06-07-2009, 10:18 AM
Why not stay with the racquet you have now and develop more topspin, so you are hitting a safer stroke that clears the net by a lot but still lands short in the court.

Cindysphinx
06-07-2009, 07:37 PM
I'm having some modest success by telling myself I won't hit winners. Nope, not gonna do it. Instead, I just try to hit shots that will be difficult for my opponent, such that they make the error. At the end of the match, I want my winners total to be (other than volleys), and I want her UE count to be sky high.

This seems to be working. So, I was playing singles and I hit a sharp FH angle crosscourt, but it didn't have a lot of pace. Opponent has to run wide, leaving whole court open.

I could have hit a winner by going behind her as she recovered her position, thereby having just a sliver of court to work with. Or I could have tried to crush a ball to her BH that she couldn't reach, thereby risking a miss by overhitting. Nah, I just hit a smooth shot to her BH and waited to see if she could run it down. She made an error.

That may be what your pro is talking about?

larry10s
06-08-2009, 06:53 AM
first, cindysphinx you are learning. high percentage singles is to control ,hurt, and finish in that order. take control of the point make them run ,hit to the open court until they offer something weak (hurt) then hit the winner (finish ) into a large target area. by not going for a "winner" outright you are more likely to not overhit or force the ball

charliefedererer
06-08-2009, 07:17 AM
Hello,

I'm between a 3.5 and 4.0. I'm taking a group lesson and the instructor said that at my level 80% of the points are due to unforced errors. He says we should dial it back and go @ 80% until we really have to get to ball. The question I have is, at my level would it be better to shorten my swings and use an oversized, more powerful racquet than using a midplus and swinging harder?

Unseen, my advice would be against the more powerful racquet.
But what does your pro say, who has seen you play?

shogun90
06-08-2009, 07:39 AM
I haven't brought it up with him yet. Wanted to get an idea of what others are thinking. For now I think I will stick with the MG Extreme Pro, have a decent feel for the racquet now and it just feels more natural for me to use my regular long swing.

ezylman
06-08-2009, 08:23 AM
My advice is to stick with what you have. Try to modify your techniques and strategies if you want to improve.

eagle
06-08-2009, 08:33 AM
Can you rally for more than 5 shots? Do you go for winners too often or too soon?

It's not the racquet. It's the person wielding it.

Keep the ball in play more and cut down on unforced errors.

I always always always am mindful of my unforced errors. I rarely hit the net so errors I make are mostly either long or wide. If I notice I'm losing points even from rally shots, then I adjust my aim such that I keep a good margin between the sideline and baseline.

Work on consistency and high percentage tennis and you'll get better results or at least feel much better about your game.

ymmv.

r,
eagle

shogun90
06-08-2009, 08:51 AM
Can you rally for more than 5 shots? Do you go for winners too often or too soon?

It's not the racquet. It's the person wielding it.

Keep the ball in play more and cut down on unforced errors.

I always always always am mindful of my unforced errors. I rarely hit the net so errors I make are mostly either long or wide. If I notice I'm losing points even from rally shots, then I adjust my aim such that I keep a good margin between the sideline and baseline.

Work on consistency and high percentage tennis and you'll get better results or at least feel much better about your game.

ymmv.

r,
eagle

Yes and Yes. I was thinking that getting a more powerful racquet and adjusting my swing to a more compact one will still keep the ball deep while keeping my swing more consistent. But I realize that if I want to get better I will have to work on my technique more and strategy even more. Unforced errors...baddddd! I used to be more of a power hitter, going for winners way too much, but that was when I was young and foolish.

eagle
06-08-2009, 09:44 AM
^^ Absolutely. If the opening is there, sure go for it.

Just be selective and smart about it. Don't try for a winner if you are way behind the baseline or if it is an impossible/low success shot.

In most cases, you have to construct the point meaning you have to create that opening. When the opening presents itself, you'd be hitting a shot that is a relatively higher percentage shot.

Go figure. Going for a winner but still a high percentage shot. :-)

r,
eagle

MNPlayer
06-08-2009, 11:16 AM
^^ Absolutely. If the opening is there, sure go for it.

Just be selective and smart about it. Don't try for a winner if you are way behind the baseline or if it is an impossible/low success shot.

In most cases, you have to construct the point meaning you have to create that opening. When the opening presents itself, you'd be hitting a shot that is a relatively higher percentage shot.

Go figure. Going for a winner but still a high percentage shot. :-)

r,
eagle

At 3.5-4.0 (the subject of this thread) I don't find that I need to consciously try to construct a point. I win pretty often at those levels basically with consistency and depth. I do approach up the line off short balls and try to play percentage tennis in general though. Usually I am gifted with the short ball without having to do a whole lot for it.

At upper 4.0 to 4.5 this may well change. I can't beat the best 4.0s yet so I can't say. :)

TennisND
06-09-2009, 12:29 PM
Keep your enforced error down. That's easy said than done. If you don't go for the shot, you will be punished by your opponent. I have lurking around the board but cannot find any threads talking specifically about strategy. For example: I just learn another day that drop shot will be a deadly weapon if you play with tall guys...
I think I need more those advices than "keep the ball in", play smart"... Guys, please more specific.

shogun90
06-09-2009, 01:58 PM
A problem I have when trying to "dial it down", is that my swing gets tentative and ball either goes into the net or starts sailing.

Racer41c
06-09-2009, 02:10 PM
A problem I have when trying to "dial it down", is that my swing gets tentative and ball either goes into the net or starts sailing.

Me too. So ya know what? I don't. I never dial it down, I know it leads to poor swings and poor results.

martini1
06-12-2009, 06:53 PM
Hello,

I'm between a 3.5 and 4.0. I'm taking a group lesson and the instructor said that at my level 80% of the points are due to unforced errors. He says we should dial it back and go @ 80% until we really have to get to ball. The question I have is, at my level would it be better to shorten my swings and use an oversized, more powerful racquet than using a midplus and swinging harder?

Unless your are grandpa age, I don't see why ppl should go back to powerful oversize and get less control. The more advance you go the more control is needed.