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SethIMcClaine
07-13-2009, 11:42 AM
I'm looking for tennis tips that may not be so obvious or writen down every where that that altered your game extensively.

Examples:

1) When serving your grip should be loose (around a 2 on a scale of Weak 1-10 Tight)
2) When hitting heavy top spin aim for the white on the net (The ball should fly about 1-2 feet over when executed correctly)

FH2FH
07-13-2009, 11:52 AM
1. Don't eat the #1 combo from any fast foot restaurant before a big match.

prattle128
07-13-2009, 11:57 AM
1. Don't eat the #1 combo from any fast foot restaurant before a big match.

Oh Big Mac, how I love thee.

Ambivalent
07-13-2009, 12:06 PM
Oh Big Mac, how I love thee.

I took his advice and had #15 instead - Bacon Cheddar Angus Third pounder. Didn't help my cause.

raffi!
07-13-2009, 12:08 PM
1) When serving your grip should be loose (around a 2 on a scale of Weak 1-10 Tight)


This.

And the old 'put each point in the past' adage. It's helped me mentally. Unless I'm having a really bad day.

FH2FH
07-13-2009, 12:13 PM
Seth, to be somewhat serious my game really changed when a USTA captain said, "Just get the ball in play. Set up the next shot."

You can't go wrong with that. If you don't make errors, the other player has to beat you with winners.

That also doesn't mean you just have to counter their shots. You can be creative with yours, putting pressure on them.

Personal tips though are so unique. I take tightening my shoes laces pretty seriously, but I give myself a lot of leeway as far as where I'll place the ball because every opponent is unique.

That adjustment should be made on the court. Preparing to make an adjustment should be done on the practice court. This is the best place for notes, I've found, and by reading here and watching lots of video.

Dreamer
07-13-2009, 12:19 PM
the tip that helped me when I was learning was:
Swing freely

10nistennis
07-13-2009, 03:45 PM
1. Keep your head up while serving.

2. Intimidation actually works. After a big point which you won, shout out or something. Then, before you get to serve or serve return, jump up and down.

3. Attitude is everything. Especially before the match. You have to come into the match confident, calm, and with an authority and attitude that says you're in control, and that you really aren't afraid of your opponent. This doesn't mean to act like a jerk or anything.

4. Patience is key to winning. Don't try to rush points in a match and try to rip a winner when you're not in position. This will probably make you make an unforced error which will put you down, and give momentum to your opponent.

5. Big Mac's suck. Double Quarter Pounder is the way to go. Unless you live in the western U.S, in which case you should go grab something to eat at In-N-Out.

pvaudio
07-13-2009, 03:56 PM
1. Keep your head up while serving.

2. Intimidation actually works. After a big point which you won, shout out or something. Then, before you get to serve or serve return, jump up and down.

3. Attitude is everything. Especially before the match. You have to come into the match confident, calm, and with an authority and attitude that says you're in control, and that you really aren't afraid of your opponent. This doesn't mean to act like a jerk or anything.

4. Patience is key to winning. Don't try to rush points in a match and try to rip a winner when you're not in position. This will probably make you make an unforced error which will put you down, and give momentum to your opponent.

5. Big Mac's suck. Double Quarter Pounder is the way to go. Unless you live in the western U.S, in which case you should go grab something to eat at In-N-Out.

I completely agree...with absolutely nothing you said in number 2. That isn't intimidation, it's being a ******bag. When people start celebrating for winning points, I just laugh and focus for the next point. It really doesn't do anything to intimidate anyone. The only thing I do along these lines is when I'm in my service routine, just before I toss the ball, I stare directly in the opponent's eyes for about a second. EVERY time I do this, no matter if we've been playing for 3 sets already, if their feet were set, they always sit up and shift their feet around which makes it really useful for picking off angles. It makes you think ****, this guy's going for something ig and they try to prepare themselves which ultimately ends up in a shank or a floater since they over thought the point. I don't know why it works, but try it out next time. Just a simple "are you paying attention" stare is all it takes.

onehandbh
07-13-2009, 04:03 PM
I took his advice and had #15 instead - Bacon Cheddar Angus Third pounder. Didn't help my cause.

A few years ago, I was really hungry and ate TWO
Carl's Jr Bacon double western cheeseburgers right before
playing tennis. I felt fine for about 25 minutes and then
my stomach started hurting a little bit and then I felt like
I had gas and it really started to hurt. I got home and it was
really hurting. I ended up bent over in fetal position on the
ground for about 30 minutes in pain until it finally subsided.
Dumb, dumb dumb!

10nistennis
07-13-2009, 04:08 PM
I completely agree...with absolutely nothing you said in number 2. That isn't intimidation, it's being a ******bag. When people start celebrating for winning points, I just laugh and focus for the next point. It really doesn't do anything to intimidate anyone. The only thing I do along these lines is when I'm in my service routine, just before I toss the ball, I stare directly in the opponent's eyes for about a second. EVERY time I do this, no matter if we've been playing for 3 sets already, if their feet were set, they always sit up and shift their feet around which makes it really useful for picking off angles. It makes you think ****, this guy's going for something ig and they try to prepare themselves which ultimately ends up in a shank or a floater since they over thought the point. I don't know why it works, but try it out next time. Just a simple "are you paying attention" stare is all it takes.

Oh really eh? I don't think this is being a ******bag. You just won a big point. You have the right to say a "Let's go, or a Come on!"

I don't know about you, but when the person who just won a big point starts jumping up and down in preparation for a serve return, this usually puts the server, who has just lost a big point, on edge. The server would likely be thinking, "I have to go harder. This guy is annoying me. He thinks he's ready for my serve, I'll show him. I'm gonna blast it at him."


And when that happens, the server will usually miss their serves. Not because of faulty technique, but because what's going on inside their brain. They want to CRUSH it at their opponent, be it to get momentum back, or just get revenge. This will likely lead to errors.




To wrap it up, when you have the momentum, show it. This isn't being a ******bag. This isn't playing cheap. This is simply playing smart tennis, in which you are legitimately trying to unnerve your opponent. Now, it may not work against some people, but I promise you, it WILL work on many.

pvaudio
07-13-2009, 04:14 PM
The problem is that winning that point doesn't mean you'll win that game, let alone that set, much less the match. And if you do spend time celebrating and then do lose the next point from an error of yours, that only propels the opponent and makes you feel worse. I have never celebrated winning a point because it never helps. I am a very...vocal player when I'm on the practice court, meaning that I end up yelling a lot when losing a point, but that's just me getting to equilibrum. I don't let it affect me in the slightest, and more importantly, when I'm playing in a real match, I end up being silent for most of the time. An opponent who reacts the same to their winners and their errors is far more intimidating than one who celebrates when they hit a drop volley. Shows that they are just playing a methodical game, and that the points are independent. People tell you to not let a past error affect the next point, I say the same thing about winners.

10nistennis
07-13-2009, 04:16 PM
A few years ago, I was really hungry and ate TWO
Carl's Jr Bacon double western cheeseburgers right before
playing tennis. I felt fine for about 25 minutes and then
my stomach started hurting a little bit and then I felt like
I had gas and it really started to hurt. I got home and it was
really hurting. I ended up bent over in fetal position on the
ground for about 30 minutes in pain until it finally subsided.
Dumb, dumb dumb!


At least it wasn't a Volcano Taco from Taco Bell. Ouch. :twisted:


"Did you just call that ball out?"

"No....I...farted...then I said owww....."

:twisted:

10nistennis
07-13-2009, 04:20 PM
The problem is that winning that point doesn't mean you'll win that game, let alone that set, much less the match. And if you do spend time celebrating and then do lose the next point from an error of yours, that only propels the opponent and makes you feel worse. I have never celebrated winning a point because it never helps. I am a very...vocal player when I'm on the practice court, meaning that I end up yelling a lot when losing a point, but that's just me getting to equilibrum. I don't let it affect me in the slightest, and more importantly, when I'm playing in a real match, I end up being silent for most of the time. An opponent who reacts the same to their winners and their errors is far more intimidating than one who celebrates when they hit a drop volley. Shows that they are just playing a methodical game, and that the points are independent. People tell you to not let a past error affect the next point, I say the same thing about winners.



Yes, I agree with what you've said, but in this case, it's not only making you remember your own winner, it's making your opponent remember the big points in which they lost, and what they did wrong. If they don't have a good mental game, they will dwell on this, which will in turn force them to lose concentration on the current point.


By the looks of it, you seem to have a good mental game, but there are lots of juniors, even adults who have really shaky mental games, and if you can use that to your advantage, then that is all for the best.:)

pvaudio
07-13-2009, 04:27 PM
At least it wasn't a Volcano Taco from Taco Bell. Ouch. :twisted:


"Did you just call that ball out?"

"No....I...farted...then I said owww....."

:twisted:

I actually loled because I know EXACTLY what you're on about

pvaudio
07-13-2009, 04:30 PM
Yes, I agree with what you've said, but in this case, it's not only making you remember your own winner, it's making your opponent remember the big points in which they lost, and what they did wrong. If they don't have a good mental game, they will dwell on this, which will in turn force them to lose concentration on the current point.


By the looks of it, you seem to have a good mental game, but there are lots of juniors, even adults who have really shaky mental games, and if you can use that to your advantage, then that is all for the best.:)
I have a good mental game now because years ago, I didn't. I have a nice pile of shattered hot melt 200Gs and 300Gs sitting in my closet. It was then I realized that throwing your racquet isn't solving any problems, getting better and focusing solves problems. Making errors is natural, and if you're playing bad, then you're playing bad. Suck it up. No need to let the opponent know you're down on yourself. But as I said, when I practice, I yell a lot, and utter choice phrases in Spanish so that I don't end up getting kicked out for profanity. When it's match time, it's pure silence :)

nfor304
07-13-2009, 04:43 PM
a missed return is as bad as a double fault.

FH2FH
07-13-2009, 04:51 PM
a missed return is as bad as a double fault.

This got Roddick to the Wimb final ...better returning and just being more aggressive with his return game. He didn't have to run his *ss off every point that way.

FH2FH
07-13-2009, 04:56 PM
...getting better and focusing solves problems. Making errors is natural, and if you're playing bad, then you're playing bad. Suck it up.

I'm gonna steal that and use it for my signature, lol. Its great advice.

And don't forget to avoid the Baconator and Volcano taco before your match!

Actually just avoid them altogether. Being overweight is generally a disadvantage ...except for Serena! ;)

BU-Tennis
07-13-2009, 05:00 PM
Pull a Nadal and slow up the points whenever a match is getting away from you. It disrupts your opponents rhythm and allows you time to think and compose yourself. This tip helped me win a really tough match at the regional tournament in high school and i've used it almost every match since.

pvaudio
07-13-2009, 05:08 PM
A deep, heavy slice backhand needs to be one of your best shots. It is truly invaluable for changing the rhythm of the point.

SethIMcClaine
07-13-2009, 06:40 PM
And don't forget to avoid the Baconator and Volcano taco before your match!

Actually just avoid them altogether. Being overweight is generally a disadvantage ...except for Serena! ;)
Did he just... He did didnt he!

EtePras
07-13-2009, 07:09 PM
Many players can't return a heavy slice. At all.

pvaudio
07-14-2009, 05:11 AM
Many players can't return a heavy slice. At all.

;)...My man

mikeler
07-14-2009, 06:28 AM
Find out where your opponent is looking just before he/she serves. That usually is where the serve will be going.

pvaudio
07-14-2009, 06:31 AM
^^^ More importantly than this, as many players above 3.5 know not to do it, look where the toss is going. If it's going towards their left, it's most likely going out wide. If it's right out in front, it's most likely down the T. If it's straying right and low, it's a slice. If it's exaggerated to the left and above their head, get ready for a kick. Only when you get to higher levels can people disguise what serve they're doing very well.

OTMPut
07-14-2009, 07:16 AM
A deep, heavy slice backhand needs to be one of your best shots. It is truly invaluable for changing the rhythm of the point.

Absolutely. The most underrated shot at club level. Everyone is working on killer top spin f/h and b/h, while slice can fetch you easy points.

10nistennis
07-14-2009, 07:21 AM
A deep, heavy slice backhand needs to be one of your best shots. It is truly invaluable for changing the rhythm of the point.

Yes. Agreed. This is also a very good option for an approach shot, since many players cannot return this shot, and if they do, it will be very weak.


So what you do, is just try the deep, heavy slice on your opponent. Then you watch their return. If they can't return it, or it is really weak, then that is your cue to just use that shot for approach shots, or even rally shots. Your opponent can't return them, so that's their weakness.:)

skiracer55
07-14-2009, 07:58 AM
...and don't think. Or, as one of my coaches said "Don't think your way through a match, play your way through a match."

dman72
07-14-2009, 08:54 AM
Unless there are public restrooms near the courts you play at, never eat taco bell and then guzzle freezing cold lemon lime gatorade before/during a match.

Talk about "getting back to nature."

"Hmm, that's poison ivy, can't use that....."

Power Player
07-14-2009, 09:59 AM
Watch the ball the whole time on their toss to contact. Your return % will go up just from doing that.

mikeler
07-14-2009, 11:17 AM
Watch the ball the whole time on their toss to contact. Your return % will go up just from doing that.


Eye contact is the best quick corrective action you can take for any shot that starts to break down including serves.

fattsoo
07-14-2009, 11:19 AM
1. Don't eat the #1 combo from any fast foot restaurant before a big match.

yeah, those fast FOOT is never a good idea

pvaudio
07-14-2009, 11:36 AM
Yeah man, I hate sprinter's toes in my salad too.

mikeler
07-14-2009, 11:42 AM
Yeah man, I hate sprinter's toes in my salad too.


I like toe cheese sprinkled on top of my salad.