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Ajtat411
07-14-2009, 01:31 PM
The combo league season is starting up in a week and I wanted to know what you guys think about doubles strategies.

This is my first year playing league, but from what I understand when match day comes, you're paired up with someone you may or may not have played with.

As far as strategy, do you talk to your partner about what your formation will be, general goals, signs? This is for 6.5/7.5 Combo leagues I'll be playing.

I'm asking because when I play a pickup game at the club, there's usually very little communication between my teamate or anyone, except for the ocassional "good shot" or "it's ok".

What I want to do is pickup one of those small 4x8 dry erase whiteboards and add some pinstripe tape and create a mini-court so I can diagram out some plays or strategies before the game or during breaks. Has anyone done this or is this overkill?

CLIFF NOTES- My list of helpful tips from TT members

1. (Everyone) Bringing a small whiteboard to matches will look stupid and be of little use. Just talk to your partner or practice ahead of time.

2. (Spot) ...First we discuss the warmup and how they looked- particularly backands and how they looked at the net.

Default strategy is that all serves go to the backhand until they show they can attack off of that side.

Default strategy in the points is 1 up 1 back- keep the ball deep on the groundstrokes and eat them alive at the net.

Signaling and things like that is best used first in practice.

3. (Schap02) As far as strategy - I often think it's more important to discuss what your strengths and weaknesses are as opposed to your partners because then you'll be able to feed off each other which will create better tennis...

4. (Nellie) I think that hand signals look cool, but it is easier to talk before the point. The server/returner will give a general plan (location of serve/return and/or type of return (e.q. lob to drive)) and the netman can also offer a planned action.

A more important aspect of 6.5/7.5 doubles is to agree on general rules - what do you do on lobs, where you are going to stand, who gets the ball down the middle?

5. (LuckyR) You want to ask what he likes to do and does well and alter your game to compliment his, since you have the ability to change and keep the play quality high, he probably doesn't. (If you're better than your partner)

6. (Slapshot) The question that needs to be asked is why you aren't playing with a regular partner every week so that you can learn the signals and move as a team.

My normal partner and I talk between almost every point to decide what will happen during the following point, both when serving and receiving. We also will signal serve location, but poaches are up to the discretion of the netman. 1 finger means out wide, closed hand means up the middle.

conditionZero
07-14-2009, 02:30 PM
What I want to do is pickup one of those small 4x8 dry erase whiteboards and add some pinstripe tape and create a mini-court so I can diagram out some plays or strategies before the game or during breaks. Has anyone done this or is this overkill?

Seriously?

I think it's hard to devise much more than obvious strategy unless you know your opponents game.

My partner and I only have to signals. Two fingers behind the back means "get your ******* serve in!" and three fingers means "you're embarrassing me."

Ajtat411
07-14-2009, 03:06 PM
Seriously?

I think it's hard to devise much more than obvious strategy unless you know your opponents game.

My partner and I only have to signals. Two fingers behind the back means "get your ******* serve in!" and three fingers means "you're embarrassing me."

I'm talking about a 4 inch x 6 inch whiteboard that could fit in the tennis bag. I figured, the NBA does it ,why not with tennis? Some people are really bad at visualizing court positions. :oops:

I would think that the signal for "you're embarrassing me" would be 1 middle finger.:)

I could see using a signal for indicating:

1). When to serve/volley.
2). When to staying back
3). Serving wide
4). Serving to body
5). Serving down the tee
6). When you are poaching

conditionZero
07-14-2009, 03:29 PM
I would think that the signal for "you're embarrassing me" would be 1 middle finger.:)

I thought about that but it seemed too obvious.

In all seriousness though, hand signals are a great idea if you and your partner can serve with that kind of purpose. I am really just aiming for the service box though, and what we do after that depends on where the serve goes.

Certainly nothing can replace familiarity with your partner.

Blask
07-14-2009, 03:40 PM
At what level of USTA play do hand signals start to become relevant or prominant in doubles? I am only a high 3.5 player but I have often thought my partner and I should use them since we play together often and it could be beneficial. In High School, 12 years ago or so, we used them. If I remember correctly we only had 3 signals though: stay, fake and poach.

Ajtat411
07-14-2009, 04:01 PM
Certainly nothing can replace familiarity with your partner.

I don't think I will be playing with the same person every match though.

At what level of USTA play do hand signals start to become relevant or prominant in doubles? I am only a high 3.5 player but I have often thought my partner and I should use them since we play together often and it could be beneficial. In High School, 12 years ago or so, we used them. If I remember correctly we only had 3 signals though: stay, fake and poach.

I think some people are just too cool for hand signals and I don't really see too much communication between partners on court.

Signals are beneifical since you can effectively cheat over to one side or other without leaving gaps open.

I like your setup. I have the same racket and hybrid strings strung at 52lbs.

spot
07-14-2009, 07:34 PM
For mixed doubles I always have the same strategy to start out with that I'll talk to my partner about. First we discuss the warmup and how they looked- particularly backands and how they looked at the net.

Default strategy is that all serves go to the backhand until they show they can attack off of that side.

Default strategy in the points is 1 up 1 back- keep the ball deep on the groundstrokes and eat them alive at the net.

If you get in trouble lob the girl- thats the get out of jail free card because women tend to ahve poor overheads if you can make them move back at all.

Signaling and things like that is best used first in practice.

JavierLW
07-14-2009, 07:55 PM
The combo league season is starting up in a week and I wanted to know what you guys think about doubles strategies.

This is my first year playing league, but from what I understand when match day comes, you're paired up with someone you may or may not have played with.

As far as strategy, do you talk to your partner about what your formation will be, general goals, signs? This is for 6.5/7.5 Combo leagues I'll be playing.

I'm asking because when I play a pickup game at the club, there's usually very little communication between my teamate or anyone, except for the ocassional "good shot" or "it's ok".

What I want to do is pickup one of those small 4x8 dry erase whiteboards and add some pinstripe tape and create a mini-court so I can diagram out some plays or strategies before the game or during breaks. Has anyone done this or is this overkill?

Ive done that with a partner at 3.0, usually if we went out and got something to eat 3 hours before the match or some other off-court time.

But during the match it's hard because you're focusing on watching the ball and hitting the ball, you dont really use that part of your brain where you'll be talking about elaborate plans or stategys.

Usually even off the court most of the things we talked about were situations where we had to question who would get the ball (like what to do if the ball goes down the middle or over one of our heads).

On the court you might not even be able to do that, you'd be better off just hoping they perform well and if you are lucky they will play in some manner that works with your game.

Which is why on the teams I run, I try if at all possible not to throw two people together for the first time ever in a real match, but that's not how other teams roll. And we try to establish doubles teams rather then mix and match, usually when I see a team that mixes up partners constantly I see a lot of otherwise decent players who constantly lose at doubles.

CrocodileRock
07-14-2009, 09:04 PM
Two fingers behind the back means "get your ******* serve in!" and three fingers means "you're embarrassing me."

Hmm... What does just one (middle) finger directed toward your partner mean?

conditionZero
07-15-2009, 03:26 AM
Hmm... What does just one (middle) finger directed toward your partner mean?

If I'm playing men's doubles it usually means "Please sir, try not to hit me in the back of the head with the next serve."

If I'm playing mixed with my wife it just means I won't be getting any dessert after the match.

schap02
07-15-2009, 03:46 AM
If I'm playing men's doubles it usually means "Please sir, try not to hit me in the back of the head with the next serve."

If I'm playing mixed with my wife it just means I won't be getting any dessert after the match.


Great advice and replies here condition, two signals - Wide serve and down the T - My partners all know I poach at the net any time I can...

Seriously, a white board? - If my partners brought out a white board I'd just start drinking because the match would already be over....If you have trouble visualizing points and strategy you're probably not advanced enough to even think about signals...Just my thoughts...

conditionZero
07-15-2009, 04:08 AM
...Seriously, a white board? - If my partners brought out a white board I'd just start drinking because the match would already be over....If you have trouble visualizing points and strategy you're probably not advanced enough to even think about signals...Just my thoughts...

Yeah, I would leave the whiteboard at home. The NBA does a lot of things ametuer tennis players don't.
With a partner I've never played with before a general discussion about strengths and weaknesses is as far as I go before the match starts.

schap02
07-15-2009, 04:16 AM
Yeah, I would leave the whiteboard at home. The NBA does a lot of things ametuer tennis players don't.
With a partner I've never played with before a general discussion about strengths and weaknesses is as far as I go before the match starts.


I know this is turning the post around a bit but I thought I would also mention that one of my better partners and I use no signals for one reason - we don't care...we're both fairly aggressive and confident on the court and we know each other's strengths, sometimes (SOMETIMES) overthinking can cause stress at bigger moments and trying to hit a certain shot takes away the mindset of jsut simply getting it done -

As far as strategy - I often think it's more important to discuss what your strengths and weaknesses are as opposed to your partners because then you'll be able to feed off each other which will create better tennis...

rod99
07-15-2009, 06:01 AM
hand signals are fine (to determine if the net person is poaching). however please leave the erase board at home. that would be embarrassing to both you and your partner.

Nellie
07-15-2009, 06:06 AM
I think that hand signals look cool, but it is easier to talk before the point. The server/returner will give a general plan (location of serve/return and/or type of return (e.q. lob to drive)) and the netman can also offer a planned action.

A more important aspect of 6.5/7.5 doubles is to agree on general rules - what do you do on lobs, where you are going to stand, who gets the ball down the middle?

conditionZero
07-15-2009, 06:40 AM
This thread got me thinking. I believe I will start giving signals like they do in baseball.

cak
07-15-2009, 06:46 AM
I've been lucky to be paired with some awesome partners over the years, but last year my favorite partner was bumped and I wasn't, so we both spent fairly successful adult seasons playing on different teams, and paired again last night for combo. I'd forgotten how amazing it is to play USTA with someone who you know exactly how every point is going to play out. Nirvana. If you can find that partner, hang on to them.

Meanwhile, last week I was partnered in combo with a lady I had never met before. I am still trying to imagine what the captain told her about me. I'm a fairly strong 3.5. I have a decent serve that gets lots of service winners. I can volley, and have ground strokes. So, she's asking about my serve, I tell her I'm not consistent on placement on the serve. After a pretty decent service game, where we had to hit back maybe one point, she comes up to me and says, "Don't worry, your serve is pretty good." Huh, you think? Everytime I hit a good shot she made some wonderfully supportive comment that made it sound like she was surprised. I think she thought she was getting a 2.5 as a partner. All I could do was laugh.

Spokewench
07-15-2009, 06:51 AM
It is really difficult to know how experienced a player is that you have never played with before. I personally would not bring a white board to try to talk about strategy before the game. However, before each of your serves, you can gather on the court and tell your net partner where you plan to serve the ball. This will help them if they are poachers, etc. If they are comfortable with signalling, the universal sign for the net person is (behind the back) either point where you are going to poach, a fist means you are staying and not attempting to poach. This lets the server know they may have to cover the other side of the court. But, like I said, a lot of people do not play this way and if they have never played this way before, a match is probably not the place to start. They will probably get confused and you will not have a very good match.

The one thing I try to do when I have not played with someone before is talk before the point; call balls either mine or yours, and play pretty straight up. I only will go to a different strategy with a new player when we are losing and we need to do something different to give the opponents something to think about.

LuckyR
07-15-2009, 07:05 AM
Dry erase board at 7.5? OKaaayy...

I would ditch the idea of "plays" and hand signals and just share ideas and preferences (such as: "if lobbed when both up, the guy not being lobbed gets the lob"). If you are an all courter, I would just ask for what the partner likes to do in doubles and try to compliment him as well as you can.

Ajtat411
07-15-2009, 08:43 AM
For mixed doubles I always have the same strategy to start out with that I'll talk to my partner about. First we discuss the warmup and how they looked- particularly backands and how they looked at the net.

Default strategy is that all serves go to the backhand until they show they can attack off of that side.

Default strategy in the points is 1 up 1 back- keep the ball deep on the groundstrokes and eat them alive at the net.

If you get in trouble lob the girl- thats the get out of jail free card because women tend to ahve poor overheads if you can make them move back at all.

Signaling and things like that is best used first in practice.

I really like this general approach. I don't think signaling would work too well in a 6.5 since a 3.0 would just like to get the ball in play. At 7.5, I would think about 70% of the time a 3.5 serve could be directed.


But during the match it's hard because you're focusing on watching the ball and hitting the ball, you dont really use that part of your brain where you'll be talking about elaborate plans or stategys.

Yes, it would be pretty tough to go with a set play on court. I like the general strategy approach.

Seriously, a white board? - If my partners brought out a white board I'd just start drinking because the match would already be over....If you have trouble visualizing points and strategy you're probably not advanced enough to even think about signals...Just my thoughts...

I was thinking of a whiteboard for my partner. Not me. :) In my 6.5 league, basic fundamental positioning, approaches on short shots are rarely used. A whiteboard is a little overboard, but sometimes I want to communicate that if I shift over to cover a shot, my partner should shift over in my direction also to cover the gap. Maybe I'm just lazy, but I think it would be easier to show with something visual. It's hard to tell your partner to shift over a certain amount of feet versus just saying shift over here on the board and cover. Like I was saying, some people are too cool for stuff like this, but then again you guys have more experience in league play.

I know this is turning the post around a bit but I thought I would also mention that one of my better partners and I use no signals for one reason - we don't care...we're both fairly aggressive and confident on the court and we know each other's strengths, sometimes (SOMETIMES) overthinking can cause stress at bigger moments and trying to hit a certain shot takes away the mindset of jsut simply getting it done -

As far as strategy - I often think it's more important to discuss what your strengths and weaknesses are as opposed to your partners because then you'll be able to feed off each other which will create better tennis...

I agree, if you're good players then points will likely end fast and weak replies would end points fast. Signaling wouldn't really do much.

I think that hand signals look cool, but it is easier to talk before the point. The server/returner will give a general plan (location of serve/return and/or type of return (e.q. lob to drive)) and the netman can also offer a planned action.

A more important aspect of 6.5/7.5 doubles is to agree on general rules - what do you do on lobs, where you are going to stand, who gets the ball down the middle?

This sounds like good advice. A quick word before serve or return could work.


The one thing I try to do when I have not played with someone before is talk before the point; call balls either mine or yours, and play pretty straight up. I only will go to a different strategy with a new player when we are losing and we need to do something different to give the opponents something to think about.

I don't know why, but guys I play with usually don't call balls, but usually the women I play with will call balls while playing.

Dry erase board at 7.5? OKaaayy...

I would ditch the idea of "plays" and hand signals and just share ideas and preferences (such as: "if lobbed when both up, the guy not being lobbed gets the lob"). If you are an all courter, I would just ask for what the partner likes to do in doubles and try to compliment him as well as you can.

I don't get why a whiteboard is such a big deal. To me, it is more embarassing to lose or scramble around like chickens. I was just thinking that a visual tool could help communicate positioning better. I would think that positioning in doubles is one the most important aspect but I usually see it as why I lose a point. I does sound a little overboard, but most people don't know as much as they should about positioning.

Yeah, "plays" and "signaling" can get confusing but with advanced players could be used. For my club level play, probably not. The idea of just a quick chat before the point sounds more appropriate.

cak
07-15-2009, 09:04 AM
I personally think you should try it and see how it goes.

Do you have a backup team/district you can play in if it goes like the rest of us think it will go?

LuckyR
07-15-2009, 09:23 AM
I don't get why a whiteboard is such a big deal. To me, it is more embarassing to lose or scramble around like chickens. I was just thinking that a visual tool could help communicate positioning better. I would think that positioning in doubles is one the most important aspect but I usually see it as why I lose a point. I does sound a little overboard, but most people don't know as much as they should about positioning.

Yeah, "plays" and "signaling" can get confusing but with advanced players could be used. For my club level play, probably not. The idea of just a quick chat before the point sounds more appropriate.


I don't have a problem with the board per se' but you are missing the point that in doubles (especially with folks unknown to you) you are much more likely to lose more in camaraderie by appearing the "know-it-all" with the board, than what you are likely to gain from the visual aid.

Ajtat411
07-15-2009, 09:24 AM
I personally think you should try it and see how it goes.

Do you have a backup team/district you can play in if it goes like the rest of us think it will go?

haha. Worse come worse, I'll just move to another city, change my name and get in the witness protection plan.:)

Ok, so it sounds like a whiteboard is overboard.

Ajtat411
07-15-2009, 09:37 AM
I don't have a problem with the board per se' but you are missing the point that in doubles (especially with folks unknown to you) you are much more likely to lose more in camaraderie by appearing the "know-it-all" with the board, than what you are likely to gain from the visual aid.

Ahhhhh, so it's not a stupid idea, just an idea that most people would not buy into since they would take it as me being a know it all. Ok, that makes more sense to me now.

But, don't people want to improve, learn and win? I know, it's human nature to be closed minded to advice especially when it's just another player you don't really know.

I guess that is the next challenge. How do you communicate with your partner so that both players can learn something on the court with no feelings being hurt. This is the reason I never say anything to my partner, even if I know what they did wrong.

Has anyone tried this? A reverse physchology thing by asking your partner if there is any advice they could give you to get better? Giving them the green light to critic your errors? And then giving critic on their errors so you both can learn and become better players?

spot
07-15-2009, 11:28 AM
Ajtat- I will give you advice that you need to take to heart. Your job is play with a partner, not to coach your partner. If you are so much better than your partner that they ask for the kind of strategy you are talking about then by all means next time bring your whiteboard out. But until someone does so if you are trying to tell them how to play its going to go over TERRIBLY. Find a partner who loves strategy as much as you do and then you guys can talk all day long about it but I seriously doubt some random partner you haven't ever met before is going to be open to it.

Ajtat411
07-15-2009, 11:57 AM
Ajtat- I will give you advice that you need to take to heart. Your job is play with a partner, not to coach your partner. If you are so much better than your partner that they ask for the kind of strategy you are talking about then by all means next time bring your whiteboard out. But until someone does so if you are trying to tell them how to play its going to go over TERRIBLY. Find a partner who loves strategy as much as you do and then you guys can talk all day long about it but I seriously doubt some random partner you haven't ever met before is going to be open to it.

The whiteboard will stay at home and be used on a personal level for my own analysis. :)

I don't want to alienate my partners, I just want to be on the same page with my partner, but without saying anything, it doesn't address the problem. I agree, giving unwanted advice will just make things worse and potentially dangerous for yourself.

I'll just ask my partner how they want to play in general strategy as far as who gets the lob/middle balls and strengths and weaknesses. I don't think much more can be said without offending them unless you play with one person for a while and are comfortable with each other.

LuckyR
07-15-2009, 12:10 PM
Ahhhhh, so it's not a stupid idea, just an idea that most people would not buy into since they would take it as me being a know it all. Ok, that makes more sense to me now.

But, don't people want to improve, learn and win? I know, it's human nature to be closed minded to advice especially when it's just another player you don't really know.

I guess that is the next challenge. How do you communicate with your partner so that both players can learn something on the court with no feelings being hurt. This is the reason I never say anything to my partner, even if I know what they did wrong.

Has anyone tried this? A reverse physchology thing by asking your partner if there is any advice they could give you to get better? Giving them the green light to critic your errors? And then giving critic on their errors so you both can learn and become better players?


I would approach it from the angle of I prefer this style, which style do you prefer? Sort of infomation exchange among equals.

Ajtat411
07-15-2009, 12:25 PM
I would approach it from the angle of I prefer this style, which style do you prefer? Sort of infomation exchange among equals.

That's the thing. Most of the time you are not equal with your partner. For example in 6.5 Combo, I'm the stronger player, but in 7.5 Combo, I'm the weaker player. In each situation, one person has knowledge that could help the other person but it will never be known since the stronger player doesn't want to alienate the weaker player.

Sadly, it is the approach I will need to take. But I think I when I play the 7.5 matches were I'm the weaker player, I'll let my partner know that he can point out any issues with my game without fear of offending me.

beernutz
07-15-2009, 12:38 PM
Seriously?

I think it's hard to devise much more than obvious strategy unless you know your opponents game.

My partner and I only have to signals. Two fingers behind the back means "get your ******* serve in!" and three fingers means "you're embarrassing me."

What does 1 finger mean? :)

LuckyR
07-15-2009, 07:55 PM
That's the thing. Most of the time you are not equal with your partner. For example in 6.5 Combo, I'm the stronger player, but in 7.5 Combo, I'm the weaker player. In each situation, one person has knowledge that could help the other person but it will never be known since the stronger player doesn't want to alienate the weaker player.

Sadly, it is the approach I will need to take. But I think I when I play the 7.5 matches were I'm the weaker player, I'll let my partner know that he can point out any issues with my game without fear of offending me.

You are looking at it wrong. The "stronger" or "weaker" player has better or worse strokes. It doesn't mean they don't know strategy necessarily.

In addition even if you are superior in every way to your partner. You want to ask what he likes to do and does well and alter your game to compliment his, since you have the ability to change and keep the play quality high, he probably doesn't.

Steady Eddy
07-15-2009, 08:39 PM
What I want to do is pickup one of those small 4x8 dry erase whiteboards and add some pinstripe tape and create a mini-court so I can diagram out some plays or strategies before the game or during breaks. Has anyone done this or is this overkill?
Not at all. Produce a playbook, like the kind NFL teams have. You and your partner should study it. Don't bring the playbook to the court. Instead download the plays onto a laptop. This laptop can then easily be taken with you courtside. Try to arrange to play at courts with WiFi, so you can search for new strategies if you start to lose. Leave the laptop on the bench, though. Some opponents object to your carrying the laptop onto the court.

conditionZero
07-16-2009, 04:18 AM
Not at all. Produce a playbook, like the kind NFL teams have. You and your partner should study it. Don't bring the playbook to the court. Instead download the plays onto a laptop. This laptop can then easily be taken with you courtside. Try to arrange to play at courts with WiFi, so you can search for new strategies if you start to lose. Leave the laptop on the bench, though. Some opponents object to your carrying the laptop onto the court.

I don't you're allowed to actually be connected to the internet. :)

Steady Eddy
07-16-2009, 05:58 AM
I don't you're allowed to actually be connected to the internet. :)
Oh no! There goes that plan.

conditionZero
07-16-2009, 06:25 AM
I found my new signal for a serve out wide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDbknq0AF0A

SlapShot
07-16-2009, 06:47 AM
The question that needs to be asked is why you aren't playing with a regular partner every week so that you can learn the signals and move as a team.

My normal partner and I talk between almost every point to decide what will happen during the following point, both when serving and receiving. We also will signal serve location, but poaches are up to the discretion of the netman. 1 finger means out wide, closed hand means up the middle. Because we've played 3 seasons together, we generally know what type of serve is appropriate, and also what to expect, so we don't have to get down to the nitty-gritty.

With new partners, I generally give them an idea of what to expect (for example, I almost always start matches hitting kick serves to backhands until the opponent shows that they can hit a decent return on that) and also have them signal serve locations, noting that certain serves are more high percentage than others (kick serves up the middle, for example). My other comment is always "be aggressive up at net - I will never mind you trying to make a play on a short ball, even if you miss..."

precision2b
07-16-2009, 07:07 AM
Seriously?

I think it's hard to devise much more than obvious strategy unless you know your opponents game.

My partner and I only have to signals. Two fingers behind the back means "get your ******* serve in!" and three fingers means "you're embarrassing me."

Now that I have gotten up of the floor and caught my breath… I think I introduce those signals next time I play dud’s…LOL!!!

Ajtat411
07-16-2009, 07:56 AM
Not at all. Produce a playbook, like the kind NFL teams have. You and your partner should study it. Don't bring the playbook to the court. Instead download the plays onto a laptop. This laptop can then easily be taken with you courtside. Try to arrange to play at courts with WiFi, so you can search for new strategies if you start to lose. Leave the laptop on the bench, though. Some opponents object to your carrying the laptop onto the court.

That's a good idea, but instead of a laptop, I'll just get one of those new glasses with the built in screens. That way I could watch a video about strategies while I'm playing! Thanks for the idea Eddy. You're the greatest.

I found my new signal for a serve out wide.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDbknq0AF0A

I might try audible signals. Loud fart for down the tee and silent but deadly fart for out wide.

The question that needs to be asked is why you aren't playing with a regular partner every week so that you can learn the signals and move as a team.

My normal partner and I talk between almost every point to decide what will happen during the following point, both when serving and receiving. We also will signal serve location, but poaches are up to the discretion of the netman. 1 finger means out wide, closed hand means up the middle. Because we've played 3 seasons together, we generally know what type of serve is appropriate, and also what to expect, so we don't have to get down to the nitty-gritty.

With new partners, I generally give them an idea of what to expect (for example, I almost always start matches hitting kick serves to backhands until the opponent shows that they can hit a decent return on that) and also have them signal serve locations, noting that certain serves are more high percentage than others (kick serves up the middle, for example). My other comment is always "be aggressive up at net - I will never mind you trying to make a play on a short ball, even if you miss..."

The captain for the 7.5 league hasn't really set any practice days. League is starting in a week or so. I missed the regular men's league so I'm playing combo's to get a feel for league play. I'm thinking everyone is winding down from the regular league play and just want to keep their game in check with combo play. I don't know how serious people are in the combo leagues, it may just be a "let's have fun" league. I play regularly with a few 3.5 guys at the club and 1 4.0 guy, but that's about it. Haven't had time to really build up a group of guys that I know how they play.

I think the general approach sounds good.

Ajtat411
07-16-2009, 08:17 AM
Cliff notes added to first post.

Steady Eddy
07-16-2009, 02:36 PM
I might try audible signals. Loud fart for down the tee and silent but deadly fart for out wide.

Stan Smith and Bob Lutz used this technique to great advantage. They weren't the first to use it, but were the first to master it.

Ajtat411
07-16-2009, 02:58 PM
Stan Smith and Bob Lutz used this technique to great advantage. They weren't the first to use it, but were the first to master it.

I could see it going badly if you pushed too hard. Mud butt!

precision2b
07-16-2009, 06:30 PM
I could see it going badly if you pushed too hard. Mud butt!

SOOOOOOO FUNNY... THAT IS A NEW ONE FOR ME!!!!!!