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View Full Version : What level is a former D1 player?


Mansewerz
07-19-2009, 08:46 AM
Actually, two questions:

-How do I know which division (1, 2 or 3) a college is in tennis? (NIU is the one i'm asking about).

-What level is a D1 college player, and what level would he be in now if he's in his late 30s early 40s?

SethIMcClaine
07-19-2009, 01:14 PM
Actually, two questions:

-How do I know which division (1, 2 or 3) a college is in tennis? (NIU is the one i'm asking about).

-What level is a D1 college player, and what level would he be in now if he's in his late 30s early 40s?
-E-Mail their athletic director if you cant find it on the colleges website
-Youre not going to find an answer to that question with

WBF
07-19-2009, 02:59 PM
http://dps.usta.com/usta_master/sitecore_usta/USTA/Document%20Assets/2008/02/14/doc_13_7372.pdf

Realistically it depends on his fitness, whether he kept his tennis up, how strong they were back then, etc.

Ignore the age. Outside of professional tennis it shouldn't matter much. I won an open tournament (albeit weak competition, mostly 5.0s)... before and after getting demolished by a player in his mid fifties.

Nanshiki
07-19-2009, 04:42 PM
A former D1 player could be anywhere from 5.0 to 7.0...regardless of age, depending on how good they were and whether or not they've gotten better or worse. James Blake was a former D1 player... same goes for a lot of top pros (ie, John Isner).

They could also be weaker if they left the game and their skills or fitness has declined.

VaBeachTennis
07-19-2009, 06:31 PM
A former D1 player could be anywhere from 5.0 to 7.0...regardless of age, depending on how good they were and whether or not they've gotten better or worse. James Blake was a former D1 player... same goes for a lot of top pros (ie, John Isner).

They could also be weaker if they left the game and their skills or fitness has declined.

My hitting partner is a former D1 players, who is also a teaching pro. Their skill level DEFINITELY depends on what they have been doing since they stopped playing at that D1 level..................
He's played some tournaments last year, but he's been primarily teaching (novices) and it's affected his game. The only time he gets to "hit out" is when we play 4 to 5 times a week. I'd say he's between a 4.5 and a 5.0, he hits with a lot of top spin (western grip) that will will bounce over your head if you don't take it early, but that's when he only has time to set up on it. I tend to hit through the ball more with a lot of top spin and it seems to give him a little trouble. He can also benefit from better footwork. He's in his mid 30's and I'm in my early 40's. We always have pretty good matches, the winner depends on who is "on" and who is "off", it's pretty even.

GuyClinch
07-19-2009, 06:51 PM
I think it also depends on the program - and what position he played on the team. With tennis some of the smaller schools do have pretty good programs. Top Div. I program - at least 5.5 IMHO.

VaBeachTennis
07-19-2009, 06:56 PM
I think it also depends on the program - and what position he played on the team. With tennis some of the smaller schools do have pretty good programs. Top Div. I program - at least 5.5 IMHO.

What would you consider Pepperdine's program to be?

BounceHitBounceHit
07-19-2009, 07:04 PM
What would you consider Pepperdine's program to be?

Good One!! ;)BHBH

BounceHitBounceHit
07-19-2009, 07:05 PM
I think it also depends on the program - and what position he played on the team. With tennis some of the smaller schools do have pretty good programs. Top Div. I program - at least 5.5 IMHO.

Top D-I schools are 6.0 plus top to bottom. BHBH

NLBwell
07-19-2009, 07:06 PM
Anywhere from probably 3.5-4.0 if they haven't touched a racket in 20 years (maybe <2.5 if seriously injured) to 7.0 (guys in their late 30's have won Davis Cup matches). McEnroe is in his 50's and still plays WTT. The question doesn't make much sense.

BounceHitBounceHit
07-19-2009, 07:11 PM
Anywhere from probably 3.5-4.0 if they haven't touched a racket in 20 years (maybe <2.5 if seriously injured) to 7.0 (guys in their late 30's have won Davis Cup matches). McEnroe is in his 50's and still plays WTT. The question doesn't make much sense.

the very best senior players with successful pro careers behind them can of of course compete with anyone, especially in doubles. Mac is a fine example of this-agreed. BHBH

Mansewerz
07-20-2009, 07:07 PM
So during college, he was at least 5.0?

beernutz
07-20-2009, 08:29 PM
Actually, two questions:

-How do I know which division (1, 2 or 3) a college is in tennis? (NIU is the one i'm asking about)?

Check the NCAA website for division info: http://www.ncaa.com/schools/index.html
For example, NIU Tennis is Division I: http://www.ncaa.com/schools/503_Northern_Ill.html

2ndServe
07-20-2009, 09:30 PM
one of the guys I with as a junior used to be play at UCLA in the 70's. This is old school, went through some problems and never picked up at racket for like 20 years. Still would hit at a 5.0 level with an old *** racket only thing keeping him back was fitness. The top ten D1 schools have some serious talent I'd say if a top 10 d1 player never touched a racket for 5 years still beat just about any 5.0 and below.

imalil2gangsta4u
07-21-2009, 12:26 PM
around 6.0

treo
07-21-2009, 01:17 PM
It all depends. I'm a 4.0 and I played a Div. 1 player 6 years out of school who had a winning record, mostly doubles. First time he beat me easily with his serves, volleys and touch shots. Second time we played those shots were not working and I beat him with my serve and groundies.

Kick_It
07-21-2009, 02:25 PM
It totally depends on the player, what and how much they actually played in college against what level of competition. The key thing is what they've done since then - with most recent being the most important.

Lots of folks stop playing for at least 10 years. It was nearly 15 for me. A lot of it depends on what shape their body is currently in. People's bodies change often for the worse and are more injury prone by people's late 30s and early 40s.

If I had to make a gross generalization, I'd probably start at 4.5 - though I've seen examples of people who are both higher than that more commonly than lower.

The one common thread I've seen with former players at this age range is they have good hands and most are pretty smart.

Good Luck! K_I