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View Full Version : Wrist not firm at contact , how do you correct it on a total beginner?


millenium
07-21-2009, 09:31 AM
Teaching someone who at contact does not keep wrist firm.
I started from contact point with follow through, did many repetitions, then progress with racket back low to high swing. But always at contact wrist is not firm, is there any exercise or drill to fix this problem?

millenium
07-21-2009, 09:34 AM
Mainly on Forehand side.

Sublime
07-21-2009, 09:42 AM
Maybe tell them to give the racket handle a bit of a squeeze just before contact?

Majik
07-21-2009, 10:46 AM
A tight grip on the handle during contact is the surest way to get tennis elbow.

Sublime
07-21-2009, 11:01 AM
A tight grip on the handle during contact is the surest way to get tennis elbow.

I didn't say commence death grip I said a squeeze... a gentle one at that. The firmness (and elasticity) of your wrist is controlled by the tension of the tendons connecting the muscles in your forearm to the bones in your hands and fingers.

Majik
07-21-2009, 02:19 PM
I didn't say commence death grip I said a squeeze... a gentle one at that. The firmness (and elasticity) of your wrist is controlled by the tension of the tendons connecting the muscles in your forearm to the bones in your hands and fingers.

The best advice I've heard is that you should have only enough grip on the racket during contact to just keep the racket from flying out of your hand. The swing should be a quick racket pull and a loose wrist about which the racket rotates to the ball. You might need a tighter grip during the racket pull, but not at actual contact.

10s talk
07-21-2009, 02:48 PM
tell them to choke up 4 " on the grip.....if they use a wristy swing, the butt of the racket will hit their forearm

chico9166
07-21-2009, 03:04 PM
tell them to choke up 4 " on the grip.....if they use a wristy swing, the butt of the racket will hit their forearm

Good tip. You could also have them move to the contact point with the wrist extended. Stand in front of them, and hold the racquet head in your hands. Ask them to use there shoulder and body to continue to push forward while you keep the racquet on the same plane (perpendicular to the ground) well out onto the line of extension.

This helps develope the feel of keeping the wrist back through the hitting zone without the hitting structure breaking down.

SethIMcClaine
07-21-2009, 06:59 PM
Tell them to keep their racquet at a right angle when hitting the ball. make sure they are doing their grip correctly, they might not be supporting the racquet enough with their hand which will put all the impact on the wrist instead of distributing it up the arm
(the heal and first nuckle should be behind the racquet)

Bottle Rocket
07-21-2009, 08:12 PM
So everyone in this thread thinks that a firm wrist at contact is a problem?

Sublime
07-22-2009, 04:20 AM
So everyone in this thread thinks that a firm wrist at contact is a problem?

No... the original question:

Teaching someone who at contact does not keep wrist firm

Bottle Rocket
07-23-2009, 02:37 PM
No... the original question:

The OP said "But always at contact wrist is not firm, is there any exercise or drill to fix this problem?".

Unless I've totally lost my mind, this implies that the problem is that the person he is teaching does not keep his wrist firm and wants a drill to fix the "problem".

Along with the original question, most of the reponses in this thread seem to be giving advice on how to keep your wrist firm.

user92626
07-23-2009, 03:36 PM
bottle,
what your problem? you're confusing yourself. LOL.

Bottle Rocket
07-23-2009, 08:17 PM
I am not confused, I am just curious why everyone in this thread thinks a "firm wrist" is a problem on the forehand. And why everyone is giving advice on how to maintain a firm wrist.

Nobody else on this board takes issue with this type of advice floating around?

For anyone who wants to read some good discussion on the topic, I just did a quick search and came up with these:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=227129&highlight=

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=212625&highlight=

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=211752&highlight=

A post by Bungalo Bill in the final link (since he has credentials and I don't):

You should have elasticity in the wrist. You should have a grip loose enough to allow your wrist to act like a hinge but firm enough to not allow you to lose control of the racquet face before and during contact.

Usually the better you get the less pressure you need on the handle to help control the racquet. This is because you get stronger in the forearm area but also develop your sensory skills to "feel" where the racquet face is in relation to the ball.

When you hit the ball, you maintain this elastic wrist throughout the stroke. This will help provide that forward movement in the hand to help provide that final acceleration of the racquet head just before impact.

You then relax more in the followthrough and begin your recovery.

DavaiMarat
07-24-2009, 07:45 AM
Teaching someone who at contact does not keep wrist firm.
I started from contact point with follow through, did many repetitions, then progress with racket back low to high swing. But always at contact wrist is not firm, is there any exercise or drill to fix this problem?

If she/he is trying to keep it firm and cannot.

It's usually symptomatic of wrong grip size (too small) or a unwieldy racquet.

Or an incorrect grip, try moving her/him to a SW.

Charlzz
07-24-2009, 07:55 AM
If you want to spend money, there's devices like Wrist Assist.

Fatmike
07-24-2009, 08:59 AM
I don't know, but this doesn't look like a firm wrist to me... check at 0:20 and after...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLo9_4R9Gc8&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Efuzzyyellowballs%2Ecom%2Fp ro%2Dstroke%2Dlibrary%2Fmarat%2Dsafin%2F&feature=player_embedded

user92626
07-24-2009, 09:37 AM
Back to the topic,

Firm and elastic is the way to go about wrist, but it might be difficult for even intermediate players, let alone total beginner. IMO, allowing elasticity in the wrist means more variables and angles in the stroke, thus complicates it. But pay off is power. On the other hand I notice that low power but very consistent hitter tends to keep their arm relatively fixed and have a push-like stroke as opposed to whipping the ball to a direction.

I think the key here is play a lot and keep an open mind to observe what's going and willing to experiment and change.

dak95_00
07-24-2009, 04:48 PM
Not joking......

Have the person slap you across the shoulder or face with their forehand swing w/o a racquet; just hand. This is the most natural thing for anyone to do and then they'll at least see and feel the concept of how a powerful/hurtful swing should be given. No one would give a sissy wrist flip of a slap to someone they wanted to introduce pain to. They would all set their wrist and step into a swing and upon follow through roll their wrist through the hitting zone.