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View Full Version : S&V approaching the net footwork help


Eph
07-26-2009, 06:40 AM
Can someone explain how one is suppose to approach the net when S&V'ing?

Are there any websites which explain different approaches, and the correct footwork?

Thanks!

LeeD
07-26-2009, 06:45 AM
Moving forward any way you want, from hop, step, walk, run, you gotta still stop and splitstep just as the opponent hits the ball so you can cover dropshots, passes both sides, into the body's, or lobs over your head.
Stay low sorta like a shortstop if you anticipate a hard pass coming your way.
Try to splitstep just inside the service line mostly, as that position allows for one step forward effective volleys and sidestepping retreats after great deep lobs to your baseline.
You can't really cover topspin lobs that clear your racket, so maybe give up on that one.

Eph
07-26-2009, 06:48 AM
Thanks. Are there some techniques on how to curve in depending on where you shot the ball, etc?

LeeD
07-26-2009, 06:56 AM
Normally you try to bisect the court depending on whether you hit CC or DTL.
Then you gotta adjust for your strength and weaknesses of your forehand volley vs. your backhand volley.
Then you gotta adjust for the opponent's abilities on passing shot tendencies, whether hard or soft, DTL or CC's.
Putting that into your computer, you try to position yourself right there where you can cover most of the good shots by the opponent, but leave his perfect shots for him to enjoy. You can't cover every shot, so try your best to cover most of his shots.

Eph
07-26-2009, 08:05 AM
Thanks. Do you know any websites/videos which will help you get a better service game?

crystal_clear
07-27-2009, 06:28 AM
Moving forward any way you want, from hop, step, walk, run, you gotta still stop and splitstep just as the opponent hits the ball so you can cover dropshots, passes both sides, into the body's, or lobs over your head.
Stay low sorta like a shortstop if you anticipate a hard pass coming your way.
Try to splitstep just inside the service line mostly, as that position allows for one step forward effective volleys and sidestepping retreats after great deep lobs to your baseline.
You can't really cover topspin lobs that clear your racket, so maybe give up on that one.

Thanks LeeD~ I finally understand when I should stop and splitstep when S-V.

PimpMyGame
07-27-2009, 06:39 AM
Great advice from LeeD. I had a bit of coaching recently and the major thing that was wrong with my volleying was that I was trying to run, set up and volley all at the same time. Break it down and it gets much easier.

crystal_clear
07-27-2009, 06:52 AM
I used to get caught when I rushed to the net to "volley". I should stop and splitstep whenever I see the opponent is about to hit ball to see which direction he/she hits. Am I right?

LeeD
07-28-2009, 09:19 AM
Yeah, remember since you already bothered to move in near the service line, you don't need a long or hard swing to effect a attacking ball. You need only to block it with some underspin for depth placement, and your opponent will have to run and dig to retrieve your shot.
So your opponent has choices of lob, pass DTL or CC, hit into your body, or dink low to your feet. You have to cover it all, since you don't know which shot he's planning.
To cover lobs, turn sideways and crabwalk back to the ball, if it's over your head. If you can hit it on a fly, you're on your own... :)
To cover passing shots, always move in slightly, maybe one step, so you're hitting from a strong position maybe couple feet inside the service line.
To cover the dink and dink angles, you have to play the ball where you can. Higher slower balls, move in. Really net skimmers, you have to play the half volley where you can.
Shots into the body, move forwards and try to short angle your volley, but make sure it clears the net first and foremost.
You have little time to react, hence the split step movement similar to a third baseman or shortstop in baseball, or a goalie in soccer.

Eph
07-28-2009, 09:21 AM
Today I was playing a 4.5 player. He kept hitting hard cross court shots which kept passing me.

Anything I can do to help me on these?

smoothtennis
07-28-2009, 09:35 AM
Today I was playing a 4.5 player. He kept hitting hard cross court shots which kept passing me.

Anything I can do to help me on these?

You were probably hitting a little short where he could take one step in and gain the angle for the cross court put away. Normally, even 4.5's cannot hit a CC outright winner if the ball lands in the back of the court. Anything they can step in on however, they can many times, hit the winner.

Steady Eddy
07-28-2009, 09:36 AM
Can someone explain how one is suppose to approach the net when S&V'ing?

Are there any websites which explain different approaches, and the correct footwork?

Thanks!
Some websites say that you want to get to "this spot" when you rush the net. Don't believe it. It depends on your serve and quickness. The important thing is that you don't want to still have forward momentum as the opponents shot is coming back. Rather, you want to be able to go: left, right, or even back up.

Also, as you come in, don't think you stand there, then see the return, then adjust. It all happens too fast for that, (at least it does against anybody good). Instead, be prepared to guess where the shot will be. After a while, you get pretty good esp. If you never do develop a sense of anticipation, then maybe rushing the net isn't for you.

LeeD
07-28-2009, 10:09 AM
Some volleyers advocate covering the bisecting angle of your court based on your approach shot. I don't because I like to cover the DTL after my DTL approach shot, but be ready to really move forward and wide for the CC passing shot. The reason for this is.... on DTL passes, you only need to block CC for a winner. On CC passes, you have to move forward and hit DTL for the winner, which takes more forward movement as well as sideways to get to the ball, so you need MORE movement started earlier. Knowing exactly what you need to do to cover CC's gives you a head start. Just angling a DTL pass gives you the winner.
You don't want to give away your knowledge of the passer's choice, so don't change your position, just get ready to move to cover the CC passing shot.
If he hits hard and within 2' of the sideline, consider your approach is just not deep enough, not enough spin, pace, or wierd bounce.