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View Full Version : help pls: why play college tennis, and,


backhand9
08-18-2009, 05:35 PM
parents, why pay for your kid to play tennis in college?

isn't the purpose of college to prepare/train you to get a job/be self-supporting,, or at least prep you for grad school? can't the kids find other good players to hit with occasionally on weekends while attending college to feed their love of the game? is it "play tennis instead of drinking beer?"

i didn't play sports in college, started playing usta adult tournaments 20 years ago. i am a tennis fanatic and love the game. and i don't mean to be judgmental, but why would a parent encourage their kid to pursue tennis beyond high school--it is just going to put the kid behind in the real world. i understand that some kids might want to become teaching pros, but i doubt that accounts for a large number. maybe the kid could get a fun job related to tennis--a sporting goods company rep--ok, but that's really just another sales job.

after watching my share of usta juniors and their parents, i think some parents of college players must be thinking that maybe "my kid is just a year or two away from really breaking thru and possibly being a pro." that's a cool idea, but to say it's realistic is delusional.

prolonging childhood beyond the age of 18 seems to be doing the kid a disservice in the long run. it's good for everyone's ego, but there ain't no free lunch.

i know i'm old school, but what am i missing?

raiden031
08-18-2009, 05:43 PM
Last I checked tennis is not a major in college, but its something you do while attending college while pursuing a degree. With your logic they should abolish little league and high school sports as well since they don't contribute to a child's education but are just games.

Sports have alot of benefits that help someone in the job world. They help with confidence, competitiveness, develop social skills, learn time management...all things that are important in the real world.

theenrighthouse
08-18-2009, 05:55 PM
it is just going to put the kid behind in the real world.

I think your comment leads right to the heart of one of the oldest debates in sports education: Are there strong benefits to playing competitive sports beyond the recreational enjoyment one gets from it?

I think there can be, but I think these benefits do not come without a significant trade-off.

First of all, I think playing competitive team competition at the college level can be extremely beneficial in terms of learning self-discipline and time-management, not to mention the many social benefits of playing varsity sports: strong network of friends, social confidence, etc.

Then there's also the fitness regime to consider. Playing varsity sports can instill a real and tangible health and fitness routine into one's life, which stays with you for decades.

Re. academics, it just depends on what he or she wants to study, how competitive the university and department is, and - frankly - how bright the kid is.

If the kid has spent all his life struggling with academics, tennis might be a substantial obstacle to getting through college. Then again many players find the strong network of team mates and pressure to keep the grades up from the coaches and department is exactly what they need to push themselves academically.

Plus, a bachelors degree is really the new high school diploma - might as well have a great time at college, have friends, stay fit, do what you love, learn something along the way, sleep with beautiful woman (or men), and just live fully.

My two cents.

NickC
08-18-2009, 05:56 PM
Because seeing a child devote his money and time outside of work towards tennis is a lot better and more productive than seeing him devote his spare time and money towards alcohol and drugs. Would you rather have a child play a sport as something to do when not studying, or have him snort coke/smoke pot/drink heavily in his spare time? It's night and day. Not to mention the rule that you've got to have a certain GPA to participate is always a good motivator to do better academically.

theenrighthouse
08-18-2009, 05:58 PM
Oh yeah, and: if the kid is old enough to attend college, he or she is old enough to make that decision him- or herself.

tennismom42
08-18-2009, 06:07 PM
parents, why pay for your kid to play tennis in college?

isn't the purpose of college to prepare/train you to get a job/be self-supporting,, or at least prep you for grad school? can't the kids find other good players to hit with occasionally on weekends while attending college to feed their love of the game? is it "play tennis instead of drinking beer?"

i didn't play sports in college, started playing usta adult tournaments 20 years ago. i am a tennis fanatic and love the game. and i don't mean to be judgmental, but why would a parent encourage their kid to pursue tennis beyond high school--it is just going to put the kid behind in the real world. i understand that some kids might want to become teaching pros, but i doubt that accounts for a large number. maybe the kid could get a fun job related to tennis--a sporting goods company rep--ok, but that's really just another sales job.

after watching my share of usta juniors and their parents, i think some parents of college players must be thinking that maybe "my kid is just a year or two away from really breaking thru and possibly being a pro." that's a cool idea, but to say it's realistic is delusional.

prolonging childhood beyond the age of 18 seems to be doing the kid a disservice in the long run. it's good for everyone's ego, but there ain't no free lunch.

i know i'm old school, but what am i missing?

You have a lot of things mixed up -- you're missing a lot!

1st, the college pays for my son to play tennis at college. They fly him, drive him, feed him during match trips, house him during match trips. The college paid (scholarship) for a chunk of his out-of-state tuition.

The purpose of college is to get a higher education. However, over the centuries learning institutions have found that they can attract more students and thus make a profit if they have other offerings (i.e. athletics, clubs, sororities, etc.)

In our entire state, there are approximately 5 people that can offer a competitive practice to my son. So, no he can't just find someone to hit with, casually. These are competitors we're talking about -- not players. There's a big difference. My son breaths tennis. He'd go nuts in 3 days if he couldn't play tennis. Tennis has been very good to him too. (see below)

Yes, the goal is "play tennis instead of drink beer."

It's not as if you can turn off tennis at age 18. These young men don't reach peak athletic maturity until they are 24. So of course they crave to utilize the momentum they have at ages 18 - 24 for college, pro circuit. To do otherwise would be like never opening up your Christmas & birthday presents, ever. They have gifts and they want to use them!

Sure some parents, kids & coaches are delusional... blowing smoke up the butt about going pro. It is no different in any sport. Do you have the same ideas about all college & professional sports? I wouldn't think so?

Diversity does work well. There's a place for everyone, regardless if they are an athlete or intellectual or both.

Without tennis, my kid never would have been able to go to college. During this 8 year journey tennis has benefited him a lot. There is a lot more learned on & off the court than how to grow a muscle.

theenrighthouse
08-18-2009, 06:09 PM
There is a lot more learned on & off the court than how to grow a muscle.

*clap, clap, clap*

Couldn't agree more (see my above post).

jaggy
08-19-2009, 01:41 AM
I have never seen the drop-out numbers but if you look at rosters it seems many who start give up to concentrate on their studies so it is a real issue. If you walk on or get small scholarship dollars I am sure the temptation to quit must be great.

CTennis11
08-19-2009, 05:22 AM
I have never seen the drop-out numbers but if you look at rosters it seems many who start give up to concentrate on their studies so it is a real issue. If you walk on or get small scholarship dollars I am sure the temptation to quit must be great.

I walked onto my college tennis team and I never had one thought to quit. It not only helped me meet a bunch of people and have the chance to compete, but it was one of the things my employer liked most when they hired me. As a member of a team they knew I had been counted on before and could handle the stress of school and tennis, so I really think your ideas are completely wrong.

T10s747
08-19-2009, 06:03 AM
In addition to all the well made points above, if you are good enough, you will be recruited and get into a better school than without the tennis. Also most real world employers like to hire athletes because of their team play, perseverance and competitiveness.

backhand9
08-19-2009, 08:56 AM
thanks for taking the time to respond. not trying to pick a fight here because I'm grateful every family is free to choose how they want their child's college years and $ spent. there is more to life than work, even if you enjoy your job, that's why I play tennis!

here’s a related issue: high school and junior tennis can be a good vehicle to help get a kid into the best academic school for which they qualify, and then assess how tennis fits into the picture at that college (that is, playing on the college team, club tennis, finding players at your level to play when you have time). to me, that is the best route. writing your college application essay(s)about all you've accomplished in high school and junior tennis and what it has done for you is great. but how wise is it to make playing college tennis on “the team” the basis of your choice of college rather than academics?

the u.s. has become a country where kids don't really grow up until they are about 27. no wonder we’re slipping in global competitiveness, but that is an aside. again, every family makes its own choice, but i think some of this college tennis stuff is a form of handicapping our children by prolonging childhood beyond the age of 18.

raiden031
08-19-2009, 09:03 AM
but how wise is it to make playing college tennis on “the team” the basis of your choice of college rather than academics?

the u.s. has become a country where kids don't really grow up until they are about 27. no wonder we’re slipping in global competitiveness, but that is an aside. again, every family makes its own choice, but i think some of this college tennis stuff is a form of handicapping our children by prolonging childhood beyond the age of 18.

For the most part it doesn't matter where you went to school. Unless you are trying to be a big shot lawyer or politician, if you have a degree at all, good social skills, and a good work ethic, then it will open lots of doors in the job world.

The reason the US is slipping is because a number of reasons that have nothing to do with college sports. It is 1) because both parents are working nowadays, kids are not getting the parenting they need, 2) because so many American adults have been successful, they spoil their kids rotten and the kids never learn the value of a buck, and 3) the socialist crap promoted by the extreme left is destroying competitive drive here in the states. Again all this has nothing to do with sports, it has to do with not teaching kids that they have to earn what they got. Whats handicapping our children is allowing them to live rent-free while working for $10/hour at a part time job well into their late 20s after earning a college degree.

theenrighthouse
08-19-2009, 09:46 AM
What's handicapping our children is allowing them to live rent-free while working for $10/hour at a part time job well into their late 20s after earning a college degree.

*** blush ***

slice bh compliment
08-19-2009, 10:40 AM
I walked onto my college tennis team and I never had one thought to quit. It not only helped me meet a bunch of people and have the chance to compete, but it was one of the things my employer liked most when they hired me. As a member of a team they knew I had been counted on before and could handle the stress of school and tennis, so I really think your ideas are completely wrong.

Well done.

If I may add, being a student athlete was a lot of fun, really rewarding, and .... a lot of fun.

I had an academic and a tennis scholarship, but I'd feel the same way if my parents had footed the entire bill. Yeah, it was a really busy 4 years but I loved it.

nytennisaddict
08-19-2009, 06:20 PM
this is probably the best book I've read that summarizes all the things you can learn on a tennis court, and how they can be applied in business (or "real life").

http://www.amazon.com/Winners-Mind-Competitors-Business-Success/dp/0972275924/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1250734633&sr=1-3

While I hope my kids play tennis, I will encourage to become good at whatever activity they become interested in... at think there are universal formulas for success that are common at the higher levels of any domain expertise (tennis, running, piano, art, etc...) and applicable to other domains.

I think the domain you learn these lessons is important because it is more likely for the practitioner to maintain high interest levels. Eg. As a typical guy interested in sports, I bet I'd have done better at my language classes in HS and College, if the classes were centered around talking about sports, and possibly translating sports broadcasts (eg. ESPN in spanish)... or better yet learning things you can say to a girl in <fill in country>... instead they had us translating boring crap that I don't even remember now.

fruitytennis1
08-19-2009, 07:46 PM
Nearly no one choses a collage for tennis over academics and if they do they will be going to a div 2 or 1 school anyways which pretty much means good academics.

Kick_It
08-19-2009, 09:09 PM
I walked-on at a D1 school my sophomore year. Our coach held tryouts, gave me opportunities to practice with the team, travel, etc. I blew off attending lab classes to do so yet got B+ grades in them by doing the work on my own time.

Determination and persistence (through the walk-on process and juggling classes with practice), time management (doing homework in every spare moment after falling asleep 45 mins after dinner after an exhausting practice+sprints), concentration, etc are all very valuable lessons I learned in the process. I met many amazing people along the way.

That summer I traveled to some tournaments with teammates and won a couple rounds in a few tournaments - but quickly realized that the folks I lost to (top D1 players and/or up to 400 in the world) were way better than I was practically ever going to be.

It was a tough pill to swallow at age 20 but over time I realized I was lucky that I figured it out when and how I did. I stopped tennis and plowed myself into my major my Junior year. A few months before graduation I accepted a great job at a fortune 10 company that year (in a recession).

Two weeks after graduation I went to the French Open and Wimbledon as a player guest with a buddy I met in college who coached one of the players.

Over 10 years after I graduated I thanked our coach for teaching me the most valuable lesson I learned in college (in his own "learn by doing" and "draw your own conclusions" kind of way) "that I wasn't going to make a decent living playing tennis so I'd be better off focusing on my classes instead". At the same time I made a donation so he could keep offering students the kind of opportunity I had.

To this day, my mom almost resents me doing that. "What about all those professors that we paid all that out of state tuition for? Didn't you learn anything from them?"

I primarily learned book learning in class. My college tennis experience taught me valuable life lessons you don't get in a classroom.

To OPs original question - it helped me grow up, probably faster than I wanted to,

K_I

backhand9
08-20-2009, 04:29 AM
"that I wasn't going to make a decent living playing tennis so I'd be better off focusing on my classes instead".
K_I

yes. i am impressed by your maturity and wisdom. you understood that devoting long hours to tennis after high school was going to do nothing for your future compared with the benefits of focusing on your academics. and you continued to have the option of playing the tremendous game of tennis when/where the time was right.


To OPs original question - it helped me grow up, probably faster than I wanted to,
K_I

life often gives us reality checks. we don't always hear/see. you heard the bell and saw the future.

gameboy
08-20-2009, 07:39 AM
I have a young daughter that I hope one day will play in college (a guy can dream!). But I actually don't care whether or not she plays once she is in college.

A lot of people are looking for college scholarships, but to me, that makes very littel sense as the time and money you have to spend getting to that level will pay for the college anyway. I don't see a lot of financial upside.

However, what I am looking for is the entrance to top universities. If a young player is a nationally recruited player, he/she is going to have an easier time getting into the most selective universities than those who are not.

And that is something you cannot really pay for.

I don't really care about the scholarship, I just want the entrance.

Kick_It
08-20-2009, 09:54 AM
yes. i am impressed by your maturity and wisdom. you understood that devoting long hours to tennis after high school was going to do nothing for your future compared with the benefits of focusing on your academics. and you continued to have the option of playing the tremendous game of tennis when/where the time was right.

life often gives us reality checks. we don't always hear/see. you heard the bell and saw the future.

I wouldn't have figured it out if I hadn't had those experiences. I devoted at substantial time (4+ hours a school day, travel, etc) to tennis for an entire school year. The best part of the "learn by doing" and "draw your own conclusions" approach is it works with people who are college age. My parents telling me "no" wouldn't have had the same result. I strive to live my life such that I won't have regrets. Pursuing college tennis let me pursue my goal as far as I could go and realize it didn't make sense to go any further.

A suggestion is give your kid a chance to do it within some sensible bounds for your reality. Perhaps encourage them to try out if they're so convinced. Who knows - maybe the coach doesn't do try outs - and you're off the hook without being the bad guy. If you're so convinced they won't go far - what do you have to lose? Contrast that with what your kid stands to gain.

Good Luck! K_I

Lefty78
08-20-2009, 11:01 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRX7TpV2Te8&NR=1

backhand9
08-20-2009, 06:39 PM
I wouldn't have figured it out if I hadn't had those experiences. K_I

yes, life had to humble you for you to grasp the reality of your situation. you eventually analyzed the situation wisely.

my point is that just about every 18-20 year old u.s. tennis player (adults in legal terms only) would be overjoyed to have their parents "enable" (thru $ or encouragement) their continued tennis play in college. what percentage of very strong u.s. junior tennis players (highly nationally ranked) is going to be able to make any kind of living playing tennis in their prime athletic years? it's one thing is for a 12 yr old not to be able to answer that question correctly. because of the way we coddle/enable our children, it seems that few u.s. 18 year old tennis players can answer that either. they are spared the humbling of life by their parents...

Kick_It
08-20-2009, 09:24 PM
I hear what you're writing. IMO: At best roughly the top 20 nationally ranked US boys in 18s will make any living playing tennis and that is probably a high number.

I am not one for "entitlement" and "trophies for everyone" that seems prevalent today. In fact I find myself in an odd situation interviewing new college grads who are the product of such environment for jobs these days.

My experiences at college with and without tennis - in a sink or swim environment - taught me such a strong work ethic and drive for results that I can't relate to students having stuff handed to them. I had to work for it, and work hard for it. Oddly enough that's what my company is looking for in interview candidates too.

I wonder how many 18 year-olds have a decent idea of what they want to do with their life at all - regardless of tennis. I doubt I was the only one who didn't have it all figured out. I do know what my parents told me to do for a major and career (totally independent of tennis) wasn't what turned out to be right for me. That was something I had to figure out for myself.

FWIW: I thought this video was spot on (though I don't wear a tennis skirt;-):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2T4BLFdviA

Good Luck! K_I

tennisnoob2
08-22-2009, 08:03 PM
Nearly no one choses a collage for tennis over academics and if they do they will be going to a div 2 or 1 school anyways which pretty much means good academics.

you obviously have never been to school. recuited "students" choose "colleges" primarily for sports. ever heard of derik(dont care how to spell it) rose? Look at the NBA, its a complete joke. people get paid to take SATs just to pass an absymal ncaa minimum. Div 2 isnt good academics either.

Question: does any1 have/know a friend/son who plays D1 tennis? does it affect academics? can they handle a real major?

backhand9
08-23-2009, 06:40 AM
you obviously have never been to school. recuited "students" choose "colleges" primarily for sports. ever heard of derik(dont care how to spell it) rose? Look at the NBA, its a complete joke. people get paid to take SATs just to pass an absymal ncaa minimum. Div 2 isnt good academics either.

Question: does any1 have/know a friend/son who plays D1 tennis? does it affect academics? can they handle a real major?


tennis players choosing their colleges based on the schools' tennis programs is a lot more common than anyone should like to admit. i hear it all the time around junior tournaments.

i've had known several players that were d1 (again, some d1 tennis programs are weaker than d3). one had to give up tennis because he concluded that tennis was making him a "b" student instead of an "a" student. another made it thru as a b-c student but he was a business major, not one of the more demanding majors.

if you have a full ride (very, very few), playing tennis, or any sport, is equivalent to working a job while attending school. at least you're getting "paid." if you don't have a full ride (almost all), only the family involved can make the call what's best. i've heard of plenty of success stories out there (balancing tennis and academics), but, again, children aren't really adults in this country until about age 27, which helps to explain some of those "success stories."

i know that although i didn't play a sport in college, i gained all of the "character building"/future contacts aspects of playing college tennis by working part-time jobs while in school. my grades and academic potential didn't suffer, and future employers were impressed by my industry and real life work ethic. more so than i think if i had played a college sport without a full ride. plus, most important, it humbled me to the fact that i was now an adult and gave me a sense of independence that gave me confidence and gratitude that spilled into all areas of my life.

cncretecwbo
09-06-2009, 03:34 PM
college is not "job preparation" college is a place for people to continue education

tennis players choosing their colleges based on the schools' tennis programs is a lot more common than anyone should like to admit. i hear it all the time around junior tournaments.
.

it doesnt matter where you go to school, you get what you want out of pretty much any school. You might as well choose the people you want to be around.

Its pretty important to enjoy yourself to, life isnt about just getting older so you can get a job and then work.

Swissv2
09-06-2009, 04:23 PM
college is not "job preparation" college is a place for people to continue education

Disagree.

College is both continued education and giving individuals important skill sets for future jobs. Just imagine trying to hire a person with HS equivalent skills in accounting, business, engineering, etc. Businesses also put weight on a college education also. College graduates made an average of $51,554 in 2004, compared with $28,645 for adults with a high school diploma. High school dropouts earned an average of $19,169, and those with advanced college degrees made an average of $78,093.

Dave Mc
09-15-2009, 11:42 AM
"why pay for your kid to play tennis in college?" In our situation, it made sense for us to do so. We only spent about $200 - $300 per month on national level 5 and 4 events during our son's early age divisions. Then in the final year of juniors, we spent a total of about $7000 on 8 national level 3 and 2 and 1 events around the country to get his national ranking inside the top 200. That was high enough to get full ride scholarship offers from a couple of weak D-I schools and a few strong D-II schools. Of course we only contacted the schools that offered the kind of engineering degree he was interested in. This "investment" paid for itself in the first year of college alone, the remaining years are just gravy. Regarding intangibles, he seems very happy with the friends he's made on the team (half of which are foreigners), and enjoys traveling around the conference, and is learning valuable lessons in balancing make-up work and cooperating with the coach. Also, as parents, we are more comfortable with him having this kind of college experience, rather than spending all his time at a fraternity house doing who knows what ;-)

atatu
09-15-2009, 11:52 AM
I was invited to play at a D2 school but decided against it because at that time I believed that if I was not good enough to play D1 I should not be playing tennis anymore. That was a big mistake and something I regret to this day. The guys I know who played college tennis even at the D2, D3 and NAIA levels all had great experiences, I wish I had done it. BTW these guys are now all doctors, lawyers and engineers, so they were not put at a disadvantage by playing college tennis.

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
09-15-2009, 03:36 PM
Sorry Dave Mc
Have to call out a "foot foul" on this one- Just inside 200 ranking and got a full ride? With 1/2 the team foreign? No.
What year was this in?

Dave Mc
09-16-2009, 04:18 AM
Actually you are correct... I forgot that we pay about $1500 per semester for a few things not covered by his scholarships. I should have used the term "full" instead of "full ride"... two totally different things... sorry for the confusion.

sureshs
09-16-2009, 07:04 AM
For the most part it doesn't matter where you went to school. Unless you are trying to be a big shot lawyer or politician, if you have a degree at all, good social skills, and a good work ethic, then it will open lots of doors in the job world.

The reason the US is slipping is because a number of reasons that have nothing to do with college sports. It is 1) because both parents are working nowadays, kids are not getting the parenting they need, 2) because so many American adults have been successful, they spoil their kids rotten and the kids never learn the value of a buck, and 3) the socialist crap promoted by the extreme left is destroying competitive drive here in the states. Again all this has nothing to do with sports, it has to do with not teaching kids that they have to earn what they got. Whats handicapping our children is allowing them to live rent-free while working for $10/hour at a part time job well into their late 20s after earning a college degree.

You got it backwards. Unregulated markets, immoral businesses, hire-and-fire policies, and lack of health insurance are the reasons two incomes are becoming a must these days. Apart from the fact that women need not subcribe to your narrow views of family any more. You might prefer them to be chained to the kitchen and bear baby after baby, but times have changed.

And once the students graduate with their heavy loans, they are easy prey for the credit card economy and increasing debt. It is all part of the pattern by which the middle class has been screwed in massive wealth shifts. It is prevalent all over the world, too, not just one country or another.

And by the way, mandating whether a son/daughter lives with their parents or not it is a form of communism where government controls your lives. If they want to do so, they can, else not. It is none of anybody's business.

Wondertoy
09-16-2009, 11:21 AM
I hear what you're writing. IMO: At best roughly the top 20 nationally ranked US boys in 18s will make any living playing tennis and that is probably a high number.

More like 1 or 2 in the top 80. Chances are very limited. You have to start with money to afford the early years of the tour. Just ask Tim Neilly who won the Orange Bowl 18s but is feeding tennis balls somewhere in Florida. He didn't have the money to take on the tour.

brosamj
09-16-2009, 12:26 PM
parents, why pay for your kid to play tennis in college?

isn't the purpose of college to prepare/train you to get a job/be self-supporting,, or at least prep you for grad school? can't the kids find other good players to hit with occasionally on weekends while attending college to feed their love of the game? is it "play tennis instead of drinking beer?"

i didn't play sports in college, started playing usta adult tournaments 20 years ago. i am a tennis fanatic and love the game. and i don't mean to be judgmental, but why would a parent encourage their kid to pursue tennis beyond high school--it is just going to put the kid behind in the real world. i understand that some kids might want to become teaching pros, but i doubt that accounts for a large number. maybe the kid could get a fun job related to tennis--a sporting goods company rep--ok, but that's really just another sales job.

after watching my share of usta juniors and their parents, i think some parents of college players must be thinking that maybe "my kid is just a year or two away from really breaking thru and possibly being a pro." that's a cool idea, but to say it's realistic is delusional.

prolonging childhood beyond the age of 18 seems to be doing the kid a disservice in the long run. it's good for everyone's ego, but there ain't no free lunch.

i know i'm old school, but what am i missing?


Sorry, but using that logic...then there should be no sports for colleges. Most college football players, basketball players, volleyball players, tennis players, etc. know that they will never make a living off of that sport. They do it for the following reasons:
**Gets a scholarship to pay for their college.
**Gives them great competition to fuel their passion for the sport
**Teaches them leadership, loyalty, dedication, etc.
**Helps them grow as a person

The sport takes them away from academics...as do jobs during the school year, dating during the school year, watching tv during the school year, etc...all of these are experiences that lead to better men and women, more well rounded men and women. I can tell you that when hiring someone out of college...college athletes have a leg up because the employer understand that his person knows how to juggle their life to succeed and has the drive to succeed--and that is because of college sports.

cncretecwbo
09-19-2009, 07:05 AM
Disagree.

College is both continued education and giving individuals important skill sets for future jobs. Just imagine trying to hire a person with HS equivalent skills in accounting, business, engineering, etc. Businesses also put weight on a college education also. College graduates made an average of $51,554 in 2004, compared with $28,645 for adults with a high school diploma. High school dropouts earned an average of $19,169, and those with advanced college degrees made an average of $78,093.

I dont know about you but it sounds kinda depressing that all people want out of life is a little more money

nytennisaddict
09-19-2009, 01:06 PM
I dont know about you but it sounds kinda depressing that all people want out of life is a little more money
If you read beyond the $$ in the above post, the point is that an advanced education (either through, self, formal, life experience, etc...) prepares you better for whatever future challenges a person chooses to tackle.

I don't understand why choosing to make more money should be depressing if ultimately it's what makes a person happy... and I think making more money means you have more resources to affect the world around you (however you choose to).