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davidahenry
08-18-2009, 06:20 PM
How much does temperature - both hot and cold - affect tension?

The reason I am asking is as follows... I have a small but growing home stringing business. At the same time, I have a very busy life with work, kids' activities, my tennis leagues, etc - thus I am not at home often. (I get most of my stringing done in the very late evening/early morning hours.)

Because of this, I am running into challenges with customer drop-off/pick-up. Therefore, I am developing plans with my carpenter father-in-law to build some sort of lockable wooden box that will have several secure compartments for customers to drop-off/pick-up racquets. The box will be secured to the outside of my house, and customers can drop-off/pick-up any time they want.

One potential problem is that a freshly strung racquet could be in the box for several hours before a customer picks it up. So... Before I develop this concept any further, I'd like to get some opinions on how much temperature impacts tension.

I'll could also poly bag the racquets - if that would help at all????

Thanks.

DH

davidahenry
08-19-2009, 03:54 PM
Bump.

Anyone?

tennisfreak15347
08-19-2009, 08:41 PM
it should work. As long as the box is under shade, no harm would be done. Temperature does affect strings, but I wouldn't think of it as an issue unless you're exposing the racquet under more severe conditions such as leaving it in the car.

tata
08-20-2009, 03:52 AM
sun should be ok. i mean cmon we play outdoors in the sun. But yes obviously cooking it inside a car in summer where the frame wud be warm wud be more severe.

autumn_leaf
08-20-2009, 04:23 AM
well the first 24 hours the string will lose a lot of tension by itself. temp wise, for me at least, the hotter it is the softer the stringbed feels, the colder it is the stiffer it feels.

unless you live in extreme temperatures i wouldn't fear it.

LPShanet
08-23-2009, 11:26 PM
How much does temperature - both hot and cold - affect tension?

The reason I am asking is as follows... I have a small but growing home stringing business. At the same time, I have a very busy life with work, kids' activities, my tennis leagues, etc - thus I am not at home often. (I get most of my stringing done in the very late evening/early morning hours.)

Because of this, I am running into challenges with customer drop-off/pick-up. Therefore, I am developing plans with my carpenter father-in-law to build some sort of lockable wooden box that will have several secure compartments for customers to drop-off/pick-up racquets. The box will be secured to the outside of my house, and customers can drop-off/pick-up any time they want.

One potential problem is that a freshly strung racquet could be in the box for several hours before a customer picks it up. So... Before I develop this concept any further, I'd like to get some opinions on how much temperature impacts tension.

I'll could also poly bag the racquets - if that would help at all????

Thanks.

DH

You haven't told us the most important thing: where you live. If you give us the likely temperature range/variation, it's easier to advise whether it's a good idea or not. If you're in a moderately warm climate, you're probably fine, as long as the temp inside the box doesn't get above 95-100 F. If it gets much hotter, or if you're in a colder climate, it might not be a great idea for the racquet to sit there for too long. It can eventually damage both strings and frame. If you're determined to do this, you could build the box, and then leave a thermometer in it and test it for a bit.

davidahenry
08-24-2009, 08:25 AM
You haven't told us the most important thing: where you live. If you give us the likely temperature range/variation, it's easier to advise whether it's a good idea or not. If you're in a moderately warm climate, you're probably fine, as long as the temp inside the box doesn't get above 95-100 F. If it gets much hotter, or if you're in a colder climate, it might not be a great idea for the racquet to sit there for too long. It can eventually damage both strings and frame. If you're determined to do this, you could build the box, and then leave a thermometer in it and test it for a bit.

The good ol' m-idwe-st... Dayton, OH. Hot summers, cold winters, and everything else in between. I tend to be at home more often in the Winter months, so cold temps might not be as much of an issue.

Thanks.

DH

tennislvr135
08-24-2009, 03:37 PM
Hot = strings tighten up
Cold = strings loosen and feel dead

canadave
08-24-2009, 06:07 PM
If you're really concerned, you could try buying a roll of plumbing insulation (it's got reflective foil surface on one side, adhesive on the other), which is intended to insulate pipes. You could use it to cover your box. A roll is just a few bucks.

LPShanet
08-24-2009, 09:43 PM
Hot = strings tighten up
Cold = strings loosen and feel dead

That's actually the opposite of what physics dictates. The warmer it is, the looser/softer the strings will behave. When things get colder, the perceived tension goes up, since the string becomes less elastic and deforms less. So, in actuality, it's cold = strings are tighter, and warm = strings are softer/looser. What you may be feeling is that in the cold, the tension increases, and then when you get indoors, or the racquet gets warmer, they lose more tension than if they had stayed warm.

dugger5688
08-24-2009, 10:51 PM
What temperatures do is mess up a string's elastic characteristics, not tension. Cold/Hot will never affect tension in the short term, however, cold conditions especially tend to make strings not stretch or hold onto a ball and it'll feel like you're hitting nothing but frame every shot.

davidahenry
08-25-2009, 02:28 PM
If you're really concerned, you could try buying a roll of plumbing insulation (it's got reflective foil surface on one side, adhesive on the other), which is intended to insulate pipes. You could use it to cover your box. A roll is just a few bucks.

Thanks Canadave - I like that idea.

DH

rich s
08-25-2009, 05:42 PM
Hot = strings tighten up
Cold = strings loosen and feel dead

backwards.....

hot - strings expand and loosen up

cold - strings contract and tighten up....feel like a wooden paddle.

rich s
08-25-2009, 05:50 PM
What temperatures do is mess up a string's elastic characteristics, not tension. Cold/Hot will never affect tension in the short term, however, cold conditions especially tend to make strings not stretch or hold onto a ball and it'll feel like you're hitting nothing but frame every shot.

please elaborate.....I would like to understand you line of thinking....

canadave
08-25-2009, 06:10 PM
Thanks Canadave - I like that idea.

DH

You're welcome...should be able to find it easily at your Home Depot or similar store.