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View Full Version : Swingweight vs. Static Weight


tennisegg
08-25-2009, 05:05 PM
Which matters more in how heavy a racquet will feel during play?

If we compare the ProKennex Redondo and Black Ace (mid versions) just for this purpose:

Redondo: 12.1 oz static weight | 320 swingweight

Black Ace: 11.6 oz static weight | 331 swingweight

Which one would be more tiring on the arm? I guess what I'm asking in a nutshell is which has more effect during play, the swingweight or static weight?

rich s
08-25-2009, 05:27 PM
The black ace will feel heavier and less manuverable while playing.

The black ace will be more tiring on the arm.

Imagine holding a hammer by the handle and swinging it and imagine holding the hammer by the head and swinging it.....the hammer weighs the same regardless of whether you hold it by the handle or head but it will be easier to swing when you hold it by the head. It will drive a nail faster and more effectively when you hold it by the handle but not be as easy to swing.....this is an example of swingweight (moment of inertia)

DrumWizOHBD
08-25-2009, 05:46 PM
The above post gives a good comparison to swinging a hammer. the Black Ace may start to feel heavier on the arm towards the end of a long hitting section. The weight of these two racquets is fairly close, so the balance can be a big factor here. However, if you compare a <10 oz racquet with a swingweight of 335 to a 12 oz racquet with a SW of 315, then the 12 oz racquet will get heavier on the arm MUCH Faster than the lighter frame with the larger SW.

But, like I said, since these two particular racquets are so close in weight (half oz), the Black Ace may seem heavier after a long match due to its slightly more head heavy balance. But they will feel pretty close in this regard. You should also factor in your style of play. If you S&V a lot, you will want a racquet with a more headlight balance, not necesarily paying attention to swingweight, but more to weight and balance. Are you a defensive player that likes long rallies, or are you an aggressive player that wants to swing the racquet as few times as possible?

tennisegg
08-25-2009, 06:19 PM
I'm more of a baseliner who prefer long rallies, though I'm ok with covering the court including vollies. I mainly ask as after a couple weeks with the Fischer M-Comp 95 I've found it is a little too heavy for me, as its static weight and swingweight are both up there. It's not too much of a bother, since I don't play tournaments or anything, just recreationally with friends. I don't think I'll get a new racquet anytime soon, but I just wanted to clear this up so I know what to look for in my next racquet(s). Thanks for the explanations, they were really helpful :).

In D Zone
08-25-2009, 07:53 PM
Knowing your playing style will definitely help.

- all court or S&V players favors more headlight over head heavy (ideal for baseliners).

Head heavy can be taxing on your arm - but you can pound the ball with alot more power.

You can always increased the SW for a head light racquet if its too unstable. I prefer heavier static and head light racquet around 4 to 6pt.

fuzz nation
08-25-2009, 08:06 PM
As you try different racquets in the future, I'd recommend that you pay attention to their combination of static weight and balance. I've found these specs to be the most helpful for predicting how a racquet will handle for me. Swing weights can be quite misleading or sometimes just inaccurate in my experience.

The Fischer M-Comp is a rather nice racquet, but it's not as head-light as the frames I'm used to and I had a pretty good idea of how it would maneuver for me before I got hold of one in a trade. What I couldn't tell until I took it out for some court time was how it would feel on contact or how much pop it would deliver. I've used other racquets with similar flex, but the M-Comp turned out to be an especially mellow frame for me. Though it gave me rather crisp feedback that I'd expect with higher stiffness, it seemed to work the ball like a racquet with even more flex than its rating.

If you were to eventually try a racquet with weight and balance that were similar to the M-Comp, but one that also had a little more stiffness, you might find a frame that would give you that same stability plus a little more pop on your shots with a little less effort. That can be less tiring on the arm. If you like to volley with authority, a different racquet with a more head-light balance (and the same static weight) might be quicker for you around the net. Just some general examples here.

There are lots of personalities among the different racquets out there and if you try different ones down the road, you'll probably see some substantial differences if you try different layouts. Static weight, balance, and flex are three big factors, but head size and string type (and tension) can make a big contribution to a racquet's performance, too.

DrumWizOHBD
08-26-2009, 11:08 AM
There are lots of personalities among the different racquets out there and if you try different ones down the road, you'll probably see some substantial differences if you try different layouts. Static weight, balance, and flex are three big factors, but head size and string type (and tension) can make a big contribution to a racquet's performance, too.

Well Put. I couldn't agree more. Flexy racquets can start to feel a bit tiring from the baseline if you are constantly swinging for power.

I used to play with two wilson pro staffs back in the day. The Classic 6.1 and the Classic 4.2. They had the same string pattern, same beam width, and static weight (as I added like a 3rd of an oz to the 4.2s). THey were from the same mold. However, the 4.2s were stiffer and more headlight, therefore easier to swing in the long run and more maneuverable and punchy at the net. So the 4.2 Classic became my doubles stick or my third set 4th match of the day stick for tournaments, when I was getting worn out. I carried six sticks around to high school and college matches: 4 Wilson PS 6.1 Classics, and 2 Wilson PS 4.2 Classics. I enjoyed the security of having the 4.2s, just in case. I also broke a lot of strings in those days, strung fairly high, hence needing so many racquets for tournaments.

tennisegg
08-26-2009, 01:11 PM
As you try different racquets in the future, I'd recommend that you pay attention to their combination of static weight and balance. I've found these specs to be the most helpful for predicting how a racquet will handle for me. Swing weights can be quite misleading or sometimes just inaccurate in my experience...
There are lots of personalities among the different racquets out there and if you try different ones down the road, you'll probably see some substantial differences if you try different layouts. Static weight, balance, and flex are three big factors, but head size and string type (and tension) can make a big contribution to a racquet's performance, too.

Thanks for the advice, I'm just starting college so time and cash will become more and more limited in the next few years :P, so I probably won't get the chance to demo more racquets anytime soon, but I'll keep in mind what you said in case I feel like replacing my M Comp at some point.

lenderbender
08-26-2009, 01:16 PM
how come all rackets have a higher static weight than swingweight? Wouldnt it be more beneficial to have it the other way round

tennisegg
08-26-2009, 02:13 PM
If I'm not mistaken, the Wilson Hammer series were head heavy and light enough so that the static weight was lower than their swingweight. As to which is more beneficial, I really don't know, I've heard that head heavy racquets weren't too great for the arm as it means more mass concentrated away from the handle and throat which is closest to your arm. Again, take that with a grain of salt, I can't say I'm remotely close to an expert on the topic.

fuzz nation
08-26-2009, 06:31 PM
You've got a decent racquet on your hands for sure. One thing that really surprised me with this Fischer though, was that I strung it too tightly when I first got it. I string myself and I think that I first put a 16 gauge syn. gut in my M-Comp at around 60 lbs, but it felt really harsh and the sweetspot seemed to be about the size of a pea.

I've restrung down in the low 50's where it's more comfortable and somewhat lively, but I'm sure that this frame would even run okay for me if I went down to around 47-48 lbs. tension. I also think that this racquet would run fine with a half-decent multifiber. I often avoid those strings because they can often get too mushy for me, but this Fischer seems so composed that a multi might run really well in there.

If you decide to try some different racquets down the road, the demo program at TW is terrific - you only pay the shipping. The classifieds here are also a good source for cheap gear and you may eventually come across some frame that's cheap enough that you can "buy it to try it". Happy hitting!

tennisegg
08-26-2009, 06:53 PM
Yeah, I might need to restring my Fischer. It's currently strung at 58 lbs with a synthetic gut, so I might try a multi in the low 50's next time I string it.