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IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 12:12 PM
ive been breaking strings really fast the last couple of months . I break cyberflash in about 2.5 hours and prince synthetic gut duraflex in 1.5 hours. I use a youtek radical pro which has a really open string pattern which isnt helping, but i cant afford this so i am trying to pinpoint the problem

Anyways, i am thinking i could possibly be doing something wrong in the stringing process, so if you could watch the video and tell me what i am doing wrong and answer the questions i had in it, i would really appreciate it. There are three parts to the video

Part 1:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfpgD97Hack

Part 2:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ss5HdTnNqM0

Part 3:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dM1_bDaOj8

By the way, if you aren't willing to watch the whole thing, can you please watch the end of part 2 and tell me if i am starting my crosses right.

thanks.

jmverdugo
08-27-2009, 12:52 PM
Boy your friend should quit whatever he is doing right now and start to work as a camera man, he is excelent, and you should start working as a director! ... NO! LOL, Sorry, I cant say anything about your stringing because I havent see the whole video yet, I just wanted to comment on your filming skils.;) :)

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 04:41 PM
i would really appreciate some help, my cyberflash broke in 3 hours of hitting today again, i cant afford this at all. I am about to sell my youtek radical pros and get somethign with a really dense pattern. Anyways, can someone look at my stringing videos and please tell me what im doing wrong?

CallOfBooty
08-27-2009, 04:54 PM
i would really appreciate some help, my cyberflash broke in 3 hours of hitting today again, i cant afford this at all. I am about to sell my youtek radical pros and get somethign with a really dense pattern. Anyways, can someone look at my stringing videos and please tell me what im doing wrong?

did you shank the cyberflash? do you have bad grommets? you should make sure and check because that could be why its breaking. cyberflash is known for breaking on shanks, especially when newly strung. if you didnt shank it... i have no clue.

check where the string broke. if it broke near the top, especially one of the mains, you most likely shanked it and i would try playing with it again. if you broke it in the middle, thats not the problem.

you can always lower tension, try an 18x20, or buy a more durable string... maybe silver string. its what i use, and i always have to cut it out before i break it. and i play at a pretty competitive junior area in the mid-atlantic. your stringing isn't a problem

your stringing seems pretty high quality. to be honest i didn't watch the whole thing. i watched a minute and skipped forward a few, and watched a minute again. i doubt it's a stringing problem

Lakers4Life
08-27-2009, 05:17 PM
Dang, using a pool table for a work bench is pretty unusual. I hope you don't crease the felt.

Use a tripod next time with a top down view. OR the YULitle trick of mounting it to the handle of the racquet.

I'll watch the rest later...and give you my critique.

mikethehamster
08-27-2009, 05:41 PM
i agree use a tripod, the handheld and constant zooming almost made me hurl.

Loopy07
08-27-2009, 05:50 PM
What brand is that stringer you are using? I have an Eagnas Flex 940 and don't really like my clamps because they move a little after clamping my cross and releasing the tension.

I'm not an expert stringer as I have only strung about 15-20 times on my rackets. Why are you pulling the string around (90 degrees) the string gripper (1:37 into part 1) and start tensioning? Is the edge of the string gripper creating a crease in the string (2:00 into part 1), and therefore weaken the string at that point? I see this throughout the video.... so it seems to me that there are a lot of creases in the string.

Couldn't you move the tension head back further from the turn table so that the crank wouldn't hit the turn table?

I have not seen the other parts, but that is what stood out for me so far.

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 06:14 PM
yeah i am sorry about my dad's videorecording, it could have been a lot better.

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 06:16 PM
What brand is that stringer you are using? I have an Eagnas Flex 940 and don't really like my clamps because they move a little after clamping my cross and releasing the tension.

I'm not an expert stringer as I have only strung about 15-20 times on my rackets. Why are you pulling the string around (90 degrees) the string gripper (1:37 into part 1) and start tensioning? Is the edge of the string gripper creating a crease in the string (2:00 into part 1), and therefore weaken the string at that point? I see this throughout the video.... so it seems to me that there are a lot of creases in the string.

Couldn't you move the tension head back further from the turn table so that the crank wouldn't hit the turn table?

I have not seen the other parts, but that is what stood out for me so far.


Its an alpha revo 4000, i thought i was supposed to pull the string to the side after putting it through the string gripper to get the gripper activated or to get it to start gripping the string, thats what it showed to do in the video it came with.., also yeah i think you are right about the turn table, how i can just move the crank tensioner away from it, i should have thought of that haha

thanks for the response

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 06:18 PM
did you shank the cyberflash? do you have bad grommets? you should make sure and check because that could be why its breaking. cyberflash is known for breaking on shanks, especially when newly strung. if you didnt shank it... i have no clue.

check where the string broke. if it broke near the top, especially one of the mains, you most likely shanked it and i would try playing with it again. if you broke it in the middle, thats not the problem.

you can always lower tension, try an 18x20, or buy a more durable string... maybe silver string. its what i use, and i always have to cut it out before i break it. and i play at a pretty competitive junior area in the mid-atlantic. your stringing isn't a problem

your stringing seems pretty high quality. to be honest i didn't watch the whole thing. i watched a minute and skipped forward a few, and watched a minute again. i doubt it's a stringing problem

i usually break in the middle or upper middle of the stringbed, but legit breaks with lots of notching, not shanks. yeah an 18x20 racket is coming tomorrow which was professionaly strung with alu power 16L so i am going to see how long that lasts me.

abenguyen
08-27-2009, 06:21 PM
looks like you string fine, maybe the gripper grips too tight and causing an abnormal wear on parts of the string or maybe your clamps are too tight and add to this effect. not sure but also mishitting could cause problems like this, and what tension are you stringing at btw?

Loopy07
08-27-2009, 06:38 PM
nice knot of string there (0:30 part 3)... hehe. That probably contribute to weakening the string.... take care of your strings man!!

I just use my finger to push the string gripper to activate the grip. Hope someone here can give you some comments. BTW, where does the string break?

tennisfreak15347
08-27-2009, 06:40 PM
it's not the stringing at fault, because it's perfectly fine. However, it would be better if you didn't bend the string at that 90 degree angle you're doing when you insert the string into the crank tensioner.

jmverdugo
08-27-2009, 06:44 PM
Maybe you could mark with a sharpie exactly the part of the string that the gripper "grips" just to see if that part of the string is the one popping and where on the stringbed it ends.

EDIT: just wanted to say that the content of the video is really good, you get to see the machine in very good angles, thanks for posting it, it will really help to people interested on buying it.

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 06:55 PM
looks like you string fine, maybe the gripper grips too tight and causing an abnormal wear on parts of the string or maybe your clamps are too tight and add to this effect. not sure but also mishitting could cause problems like this, and what tension are you stringing at btw?

i am stringing at 57-60lbs with full poly generally, and i am breaking the strings where there is lots of notching which is near the middle of hte stringbed. Although the youtek radical pro is a 16x19, for some reason the gaps seem extra big between each string, this is probably leading to even faster breakage. Man, i was really loving how this racket was playing.

IwishIwasbetter
08-27-2009, 06:57 PM
Maybe you could mark with a sharpie exactly the part of the string that the gripper "grips" just to see if that part of the string is the one popping and where on the stringbed it ends.

EDIT: just wanted to say that the content of the video is really good, you get to see the machine in very good angles, thanks for posting it, it will really help to people interested on buying it.

thats a really good idea about the marking the string where it is being put in the string gripper, i will try that, and thank you

jmverdugo
08-27-2009, 07:11 PM
Ok I just watched all the videos, I do not see anything extremely wrong, maybe you should stop bending the string while tension it, also you should avoid any mess with the string to avoid bending it, like happened when you were pulling the second cross I think. The knots are OK, they usually deform the grommets. I would recommend you to tension the knots with your starting clamp, it is way WAY more easy and safer, you may end up with the pliers on you chin! (it is not a joke it happens more often than you think!).

I am not familiar with this model, is it possible to move the crank system half an inch further away from the turntable?

abenguyen
08-27-2009, 08:53 PM
i am stringing at 57-60lbs with full poly generally, and i am breaking the strings where there is lots of notching which is near the middle of hte stringbed. Although the youtek radical pro is a 16x19, for some reason the gaps seem extra big between each string, this is probably leading to even faster breakage. Man, i was really loving how this racket was playing.

odd, maybe you should try a newer string? seems like all the strings you have tried break very quickly on you. do you shank much on all? we may need a playing video to see exactly how hard you are whacking the ball.

babolat15
08-27-2009, 10:15 PM
dude dont switch rackets...you always go with what racket you play with best...there will always be a more durable string...also look into string savers

xHBvi3tbOix
08-27-2009, 10:50 PM
Boy your friend should quit whatever he is doing right now and start to work as a camera man, he is excelent, and you should start working as a director! ... NO! LOL, Sorry, I cant say anything about your stringing because I havent see the whole video yet, I just wanted to comment on your filming skils.;) :)

I did not catch your sarcasm until about 12 posts down

Lakers4Life
08-27-2009, 11:00 PM
After watching all 28 mins of video, I just want to say, I want my 28 mins back! Just kidding! I got a bit dizzy from the quick camera moves, I felt like I was watching Cloverfield. JOKE! OK now for the serious stuff.

Its an alpha revo 4000, i thought i was supposed to pull the string to the side after putting it through the string gripper to get the gripper activated or to get it to start gripping the string, thats what it showed to do in the video it came with.., also yeah i think you are right about the turn table, how i can just move the crank tensioner away from it, i should have thought of that haha

There is a lever kinda hanging at the bottom front (towards the turntable). Turn it 90 degrees, and lift the front to move the position of the crank so it does not hit the table when cranking. I like to keep the crank in the 12 o'clock position when it is closest to the turntable.


it's not the stringing at fault, because it's perfectly fine. However, it would be better if you didn't bend the string at that 90 degree angle you're doing when you insert the string into the crank tensioner.

I agree! it's not good to put 90 degree angles on the string, especially stiff polys. Once the string is between the gripper gap, push it left (or towards the turn table, and slowly tension until it's fully gripped and not slipping, then release before the lock out lever deploys. If you turn too fast the you risk the chance of getting hit by the tip of the lock out lever.

Here are other points you need to practice:

1.) Pre-weave your mains, leave a large enough loop on the first mains so you can loop it on the tension head.

2.) Use a Parnell Knot.* It's quite easy to do and very efficent. Also use the starting clamp to help pull. The edges of the plyers may cut into the string prematurely and now you have a short string to work with, or worse.

3.) Improve your cross weaving technique. Watch *YULitle's videos, he will show you the correct technique for most of your problems. He also covers Parnell knots and starting crosses and mains.

4.) Check your string clamps grip pressure. That may be the cause of premature string damage.

Good Luck!

Irvin
08-28-2009, 02:14 AM
I can't believe no one has commented for you yet. I have to admit I hate watching videos and did not look at all of them but some of all three. Here are a couple of things I did notice.

1 - I would not use a starting clamp to start my mains. Notice how it angles up when you pull tension. That cant be good for the grommet or the string for that matter. When you removed the clamp also it was still angled up slightly and it looks as though you pulled it out. Another bad thing for the string. Instead I would use the regular clamp (because you have fixed clamps) and set tension in them before you start by double pulling both mains at once then clamp one as near the head of the racket as you can. Release tension and pull tension on the string opposite the string you just clamped. Then move to the other side and string two mains, switch back and string two mains at a time on each side until you are done. When you move the clamp down near the other clamp do not try to FORCE the clamp up on the string as close as you can to the other clamp.

2 - When you clamp the mains it looks like you are not getting the string down far enough in the gripper. It appears as though there are stops in the clamps and you are only going half way down. Get the string down in the grip more. You may have to loosed the clamp a little to do this.

3 - QUIT PLAYING WITH THE TENSION HEAD GRIPPER. You even notice the string is marred where the tension head gripper grips the string. At one point you moved the screw all the way in (you said tighten it.) When that screw is in the gripper grips the string less. That screw is a stop to limit travel so it does not crush your string. If it is moved in too far is grips less and the string slips. Slipping causes marring and weakens you string right in the middle of the pattern. That that screw all the way out and string your racket one time. You should notice there is no more marring on the string where the gripper was. Not adjust it according to the manufacturer's recommended procedure.

4 - Releasing the clamps. When you starting stringing the crosses you forgot to change the tension. So what did you do? You released the tension rather quickly on a tensioned string. Never do that. If you are going to release the clamp on a string pull tension (at least by hand) and then release the clamp gently. Always set the clamp on the string first then the base, when removing the clamp always release the clamp on the base first then the string.

I will try to watch more and see if I notice any more.

Irvin

bsandy
08-28-2009, 02:56 AM
That happened to the leather grip the radical pro comes with ?

YULitle
08-28-2009, 07:16 AM
Irvin beat me to it. My first problem came with you starting the mains with the starting clamp. The starting clamp should only hold tension when it is flush up against the frame and not precariously dangling on the edge of the center mount. The Eagnas website has a picture of the starting clamp being used exactly as you used it and I DO NOT recommend you continue to follow it's example.

uk_skippy
08-28-2009, 07:50 AM
I would not use a starting clamp to start my mains. Notice how it angles up when you pull tension. That cant be good for the grommet or the string for that matter. When you removed the clamp also it was still angled up slightly and it looks as though you pulled it out. Another bad thing for the string.

Irvin beat me to it. My first problem came with you starting the mains with the starting clamp. The starting clamp should only hold tension when it is flush up against the frame and not precariously dangling on the edge of the center mount. The Eagnas website has a picture of the starting clamp being used exactly as you used it and I DO NOT recommend you continue to follow it's example.

I start my mains by using a starting clamp on the inside of the frame and don't have a problem. I do clamp it on say the 2nd left main, and then the 1st string I tension is the 1st left main followed by the 1st right main. The starting clamp is designed for this process. What you need to do is make sure that the clamp is fitted flush, as YULitle states, against the grommet/frame. I also put some scrap leather inbetween the clamp and the frame just to protect the frame.

In the following Babolat video (at around 12:00), the guy from Babolat actually shows you how to use the clamp.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3083498355369693136

The method the OP is using is ok, but it needs to the refined. It certainly doesn't want to be at an angle as it is likely to damage things and it could 'snap' back while fighting the tension if it isn't set properly.

regards

Paul

tennisfreak15347
08-28-2009, 08:35 AM
also, to further elaborate on YULitle's comment, there are better ways to start mains with fixed clamps, as shown in his videos, but if you still insist on using a starting clamp to start the mains, you should atleast put tension inside the clamp. what i mean is, you're clamping it without applying tension to the string, so the tension will be innacurate. You should double pull the two middle mains, and then clamp it with the starting clamp. this way, tension would be held inside the starting clamp

uk_skippy
08-28-2009, 08:50 AM
but if you still insist on using a starting clamp to start the mains, you should atleast put tension inside the clamp. what i mean is, you're clamping it without applying tension to the string, so the tension will be innacurate. You should double pull the two middle mains, and then clamp it with the starting clamp. this way, tension would be held inside the starting clamp

???

Not sure what you mean? Must be missing something.

I put my starting clamp on 2nd LM and then tension 1st LM. I don't double pull the 2 centre mains.

If you used the fixed clamp like the OP you'd put the 1st clamp where he's put the starting clamp. Then you'd tension the 1st main on the opposite side. This is the standard way as shown by the USRSA. The difference with the OP is that he's replaced the fixed clamp with the starting clamp, albeit in not the best manner.

Please enlighten me if I've got this wrong, or I'm doing this wrong.

Regards

Paul

YULitle
08-28-2009, 11:01 AM
Yeah, if you do it on the second grommet away from the center, than it's no big deal. But, if it's going to get twisted in anyway by being on the first, then it shouldn't be put there.

Now, as to what tennisfreak said. This is something that I do when using the machine clamp as an anchor. The technique is in one or two of my videos and is something that was shown to me a while back and, thinking it worthy, I have used it ever sense.

Irvin
08-28-2009, 11:08 AM
I start my mains by using a starting clamp on the inside of the frame and don't have a problem. I do clamp it on say the 2nd left main, and then the 1st string I tension is the 1st left main followed by the 1st right main. The starting clamp is designed for this process. What you need to do is make sure that the clamp is fitted flush, as YULitle states, against the grommet/frame...

I am glad you never had a problem doing that. When the original poster used his starting clamp to hold the string the starting clamp was bent up at 45 degrees and remained that way when the tension was pulled on the string from the bottom. That can't be flush against the frame except for the inner beveled edge of the frame. Wonder what is holding that clamp and string up with tension on the string?

When you place your starting clamp on the second main and pull tension on the first the starting clamp is pushing the grommet through the frame hole and hopefully not damaging the grommet. Good luck

Irvin

uk_skippy
08-28-2009, 02:30 PM
I am glad you never had a problem doing that. When the original poster used his starting clamp to hold the string the starting clamp was bent up at 45 degrees and remained that way when the tension was pulled on the string from the bottom. That can't be flush against the frame except for the inner beveled edge of the frame. Wonder what is holding that clamp and string up with tension on the string?

I agree that the position of the starting clamp is not good, ie the angle of it

When you place your starting clamp on the second main and pull tension on the first the starting clamp is pushing the grommet through the frame hole and hopefully not damaging the grommet. Good luck

I'll make a video and show that there is no problem using this method. You are making it sound as if the clamp is pushing the grommet back through the hole a (relatively) long way. This does not happen, especially when I use a piece of leather to cushion it. There is no damage to the grommet and no damage to the frame or the string. I have used this method for many years without a problem. I've used it on top pro's rqts without a problem. There are other tournament stringers who do the same or similar and don't have a problem. I've used the method string V. Spadea's POGs @ 72lb with gut

Luck doesn't come into it. Its experience and skill. Its knowing how to handle strings. Its knowing what works, works well and what is bad practice.

Regards

Paul

Irvin
08-29-2009, 03:24 AM
I'll make a video and show that there is no problem using this method. You are making it sound as if the clamp is pushing the grommet back through the hole a (relatively) long way...

Paul

No need to make a video I believe you. The grommet can't be pushed too far (if there is a grommet.) I just like to double pull the first to mains to set the tension in the machine clamp then pull each main center out one at a time. I have been doing it that way for almost 30 years and I am not going to quit until I find what I think is a better method.

Luck doesn't come into it. Its experience and skill. Its knowing how to handle strings. Its knowing what works, works well and what is bad practice

Correct. How about if I just say have fun stringing.

Irvin

uk_skippy
08-29-2009, 03:37 AM
No need to make a video I believe you. The grommet can't be pushed too far (if there is a grommet.) I just like to double pull the first to mains to set the tension in the machine clamp then pull each main center out one at a time. I have been doing it that way for almost 30 years and I am not going to quit until I find what I think is a better method.



Correct. How about if I just say have fun stringing.

Irvin

Dang! And I was getting my uploading new software too :-)

I think that this is a classic case of stringers having differing methods, but 1) as long as we're consistent in what we do and 2) the method is sound and not depremental to the frame & string.


Yeah Irvin, I agree, lets go string.

Regards

Paul

Irvin
08-29-2009, 06:13 AM
'IwishIwasbetter,' sorry your post got hijacked a couple of days there. Did you ever try loosening the set screw on the tension head gripper? Loosening that screw allows the gripper to grip the string tighter. When you tighten the screw that reduces travel on the bearing mounted grippers which is turn widens the gap between and in turn reducing the grip. You may have been damaging your string having the gripper screw adjusted too far in.

The way you were constantly rubbing the string where it was gripped led me to believe that was your major issue.

Irvin

diredesire
08-29-2009, 09:16 AM
Stringing part 2: Back your tensioner up a little on the track, so you don't interfere with your turn table. Simple solution ;)

There's no need to bend at a 90 degree angle perpendicular to your gripper. Pull the string DOWN (inline with your tensioner) at about a 30 degree angle. The REASON you need to do so is so that the gripper can start to close. You could also just rest a finger behind the string and not bend it at all. This isn't really that big of a deal since i can tell you're bending it "gently" and not at a really kink-tastic angle, but there are much friendlier ways. Like I said, downwards, not side to side. Or just push in the jaws from the back, that will work, too.

I've mentioned the set screw before, and I explained how it works. Turning it all the way in LOOSENS (restricts movement) of the jaws. It's counter intuitive, but if you examine it without strings, you'll see exactly why. you shouldn't have to adjust it AT ALL once you started stringing in 95% of cases. Adjust properly per gauge, and then leave it alone. You mentioned the string feels "really rough" when you tensioned the first main. "rough" isn't necessarily unusual, but "really rough" is. It's really hard to tell whether or not it's normal because you probably don't know in comparison ;) I noticed when you mentioned that, your set screw was pretty far in, this could be slippage of the string. The sharpie trick mentioned above will help you with that. If anything, it's slippage damage, not compression, since you stated later that it wasn't rough/damaged as badly, and the gripper was tighter.

I recommend for new stringers to adjust the shoulder mounts so they lightly, lightly touch first, before the 12/6. I've seen way too many people stretch their racquets slightly with the 12/6 before adjusting the shoulder mounts. Get the shoulder mounts touching, and aligned correctly and then lightly touch the 12/6 to the frame, then finger tighten the shoulder mounts simultaneously, then the 12/6. I'm sure others will disagree with my approach, because it takes a little more time, but I see you adjusting your shoulder mounts one by one after you adjust the 12/6 (which look to be slightly too tight). Once you have the 12/6 there, they resist the movement from your shoulder mounts, so you can theoretically have uneven "support" (aka pressure). This isn't a big deal, but if we're talking in the measure of absolute correctness, you should take a close look at this.

As has been said, don't use your starting clamp like that for the mains. Use your fixed clamp, and then "back it up" by putting the starter behind it. It will get in the way a tiny bit, but I always string two mains on one side, so the clamps don't fight, and i'm able to get them on the same side, both near the frame. (If you alternate one by one at the start, the second clamp you move is going to be further from the frame, unless you have very thin clamp heads).

Also, I can't really tell, but it looks like your clamp heads are slightly loose. They should have a firm, positive action, and shouldn't close tooooo easily. It shouldn't be difficult to close, but it should have a good action. You'll know when it's right.

I'd like to see the outside of the frame when you tie your knot. It doesn't look like you're putting altogether much force in the tie off. You might be losing a lot of tension :) You can reduce (but not really cure) the grommet chipping by tying the knot so the bulky side is on the other side. Grommets are plastic, and they do break. You seem to be putting the bulky side on the side closer to the string (hard to explain), so there is less room for the plastic to stretch and flex. After you tie off the string, before you cut, you can wiggle the knot so it's "sitting" on the wider side. The knot shouldn't be pulling through at all if you are tying off, it's more a problem on starter knots... As far as the starting knot, you can use a different method to start your crosses, namely... the starting clamp! You can also use a "deadman's knot," which is essentially sticking a scrap piece of string UNDER the knot, to give it a little scrap piece to "sit" on. The starting clamp method is much cleaner, and you can use whatever knot you want.

Learn to weave one ahead. It's really not complicated, and you don't have to think about it too much, it is just confusing at first. Here is the only thing you have to remember.
Weave 2 to start, tension the first.

After that:
"Weave, tension, weave, tension, weave, tension"

Like I said, it's simple, just weave two to start. Leave a loop so you can reach the tensioner. That is IT.








Like i said in the other thread, if your strings are deeply notched, it's not likely to be stringing, unless you are burning your strings in the cross stringing, which is possible, since you don't start out one ahead, but is incredibly unlikely, since you pull slow, and you do fan your crosses (although you should be fanning over a larger area of the string bed). I am going to venture to say the "damage" you're feeling on your mains is normal, but can be exaggerated by improperly setting your set screw. Test if you are getting string slippage, and then report back. If you aren't, then you're A-OK. At this point, you should either find a more durable string (also, what gauge are you playing with? I would have guessed 1.20... which is pretty darn thin..), or just switch to a new frame. If you can still play well with a denser pattern, you've got nothing to lose. Your durability WILL increase a LOT. (Unless you're a really crazy string breaker, in which case it might not change TOO much, but you'll still see benefits). String pattern makes a big difference.

Also, your stringing machine is too high for you ;)

Irvin
08-29-2009, 10:04 AM
...I recommend for new stringers to adjust the shoulder mounts so they lightly, lightly touch first, before the 12/6. I've seen way too many people stretch their racquets slightly with the 12/6 before adjusting the shoulder mounts. Get the shoulder mounts touching, and aligned correctly and then lightly touch the 12/6 to the frame, then finger tighten the shoulder mounts simultaneously, then the 12/6. I'm sure others will disagree with my approach...

You are right about the disagree part but I agree with what you said. Too much pressure on any of the mounts can distort the racket. If I adjust the should mounts first and then the 12 and 6 mounts (which on my machine both adjust at the same time) the 12 and 6 mounts will have to be adjusted shorter than the inside of the frame. When I do adjust the 12 and 6 mounts the four shoulder mounts will also move at the same time away from the frame so they will need to be adjusted again.

I adjust the 12 and 6 mounts so they are close then adjust the bottom shoulder mounts in to center the racket on the 12 mount. Then adjust the 12 and 6 mounts with the racket perfectly centered. If your shoulder mounts adjust independantly you can't do this as easily. Then snug all mounts.

Irvin

IwishIwasbetter
08-29-2009, 01:35 PM
'IwishIwasbetter,' sorry your post got hijacked a couple of days there. Did you ever try loosening the set screw on the tension head gripper? Loosening that screw allows the gripper to grip the string tighter. When you tighten the screw that reduces travel on the bearing mounted grippers which is turn widens the gap between and in turn reducing the grip. You may have been damaging your string having the gripper screw adjusted too far in.

The way you were constantly rubbing the string where it was gripped led me to believe that was your major issue.

Irvin

you are right that that was my major issue, unfortunately though i did try loosening the set screw about all the way and there is still damage being done to the string, although slightly less roughness still a good amount.

IwishIwasbetter
08-29-2009, 01:47 PM
to diredesire,
I usually use a 1.30 string but sometimes 1.25, anyways i found a new frame that is 18x20 that i like a lot and the strings seem to be lasting a good amount longer so far:) ( its lux alu 16L currenty in that racket) , thanks for the informative post, i will be putting up a new stringing video tomorrowof the changes you mentioned and the new questions i might have, in the video i will try getting the outside of the racket when i tie the knot like you said, and i will try mounting like you said, and that 30 degree downwards angle straight from the gripper works perfect and is much friendlier to the string btw, oh yeah i did weave one ahead near the end of part 3 in that video if you could look at it and see if im doing it right, and yeah i think the roughness im having is pretty normal although im still confused as how even when the set screw is all the way out there is still some roughenss but if its normal i dont really care then, anyways thanks for all the help

Loopy07
08-29-2009, 02:08 PM
Learn to weave one ahead. It's really not complicated, and you don't have to think about it too much, it is just confusing at first. Here is the only thing you have to remember.
Weave 2 to start, tension the first.

After that:
"Weave, tension, weave, tension, weave, tension"

Like I said, it's simple, just weave two to start. Leave a loop so you can reach the tensioner. That is IT.


I remember seeing this on one of the videos on youtube from YUlitle I believe. I do weave one ahead when stringing, but what is the purpose of this? Do you guys still do this toward the end where there are only a few crosses left?.... there aren't much room and string left to weave one ahead toward the end.

Irvin
08-29-2009, 03:56 PM
you are right that that was my major issue, unfortunately though i did try loosening the set screw about all the way and there is still damage being done to the string, although slightly less roughness still a good amount.

There should not be any roughness. Call Alpha and ask them how to correct the roughness problem. Try putting your finger on back of the gripper and pushing it toward the racket before you pull tension to set the gripper.

Irvin