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View Full Version : KPro 88 - who is using it and what has your experience been?


AndrewD
08-27-2009, 03:28 PM
I'm most interested in the experience of people who have switched to the K88 as their main racquet - what alterations or adjustments they've had to make (if any) and how they've found it to perform in the key areas (serve, groundstrokes, topspin, slice, volleys, overheads).

movdqa
08-27-2009, 03:53 PM
I think that it performs well in all of the areas that you mentioned - the obvious downside is weight. I have overgrips on mine which probably makes them a little more headlight. The three that I have are stock at 12.7, 12.9 and 13.1 ounces so I have a choice of weights when I go out to play. The heavier racquet hits with more power but I can't generate as much spin. The lighter racquet is better on spin and maneuverability.

Kirko
08-27-2009, 04:33 PM
from feb. to may and its an above normal player's racket, that is powerful and to me very welcomed. I had mine weighted to 13 oz. (lead tape at 10 & 2 o'clock. the only downside to the racket was the dreadful leather grip lick as a wet coke bottle. the main thing I liked about the frame was how easy topspin was obtained. reminded me very much of the wilson ultra II.

AndrewD
08-27-2009, 08:26 PM
Thanks very much movdqa and Kirko.
Nice to have a response from two long-term posters, it adds a bit of weight to the opinion. I think Drakulie and Craig C are also using the 88 so, hopefully, they might chime in as well.

Would either of you be willing to say that it favours one type of hitter (as opposed to player) over the other? Based purely on the specs I'd have thought it most suited to someone who hits quite flat and drives through their shots rather than hits up the back of the ball. I know the feeling might be that something of this weight requires you to hit with a lot of racquet head speed but I'd be more inclined to think it suits someone who hits with a more 'old fashioned' technique.

Hoping to get a hit with it on Sunday and that should answer most of my questions.

I will read through the much longer K88 thread. I only put this up because I thought my question might be lost or missed in such a long thread.

movdqa
08-27-2009, 08:48 PM
This racquet has a massive amount of power, more than any other racquet that I've hit with. I think that most players with the ability to use this racquet would have trouble keeping the ball in the court without adding a fair amount of topspin or stringing it tightly if using flat strokes. I think that this is what you'll find in reading comments in the big thread.

vndesu
08-27-2009, 09:23 PM
i like my kps88 bc with its heavy weight i can produce the pace needed when just swining regulary.
the only downside for me is that the weight will kill my arm if the match is long

AndrewD
08-28-2009, 12:11 AM
This racquet has a massive amount of power, more than any other racquet that I've hit with. I think that most players with the ability to use this racquet would have trouble keeping the ball in the court without adding a fair amount of topspin or stringing it tightly if using flat strokes. I think that this is what you'll find in reading comments in the big thread.

It will be an interesting test then. I'm certainly not the world's greatest player but I do have good hands (unfortunately, I've also got concrete feet) and have always been able to play racquets at lower tensions than other people while still taking a full swing. Perhaps it might go okay with some Leoina 15L.

akybo
08-28-2009, 12:20 AM
Maybe some of the users could post videos with them playing with the KPS88?It would be interesting to see this racquet in action.

Aces09
08-28-2009, 05:49 AM
I got the KPS 88 three months ago, and it wasn't my MAIN racquet until a month ago. Despite the midsize head, it hits and feels like a midplus. You just need to watch the ball hit the strings, like Federer. Spin generation is great because of the very open string pattern. I've never hit better serves in my life, the plow through is second to none and thanks to the stiffness, blocking back serves is easy, but there's also more than enough control to take a rip at returns..On groundies, I take full advantage of the stability and plow through as I smash the ball around the court. Hitting volleys was a dream because of the small head, stiffness and open string pattern which results in quite a fantastic feel. You can just angle the racquet head to redirect pace right into the open court. I don't advise this racquet to people who like swinging at returns, this is a classic racquet meant for a serve/volleyer. BUT, groundies are still great. I'm thinking of changing the leather grip for a synthetic, but I'm not 100% sure

movdqa
08-28-2009, 06:32 AM
> Maybe some of the users could post videos with them playing
> with the KPS88?It would be interesting to see this racquet in
> action.

I've been thinking of buying a video camera but moreso to do lectures. You can see videos of the TW testers using the KPS88 on the TW KPS88 page. You can get an idea of the power of the frame. The testers don't swing out on their shots but they're still hitting powerful shots. The video also gives you a feel for the amount of punch it delivers on volleys.

AndrewD
08-28-2009, 07:14 AM
You can see videos of the TW testers using the KPS88 on the TW KPS88 page. You can get an idea of the power of the frame. The testers don't swing out on their shots but they're still hitting powerful shots. The video also gives you a feel for the amount of punch it delivers on volleys.

Actually, one of the things most noticeable to me was how short Chris was hitting. Looked very different to the usually good depth he gets on his shots.

drakulie
08-28-2009, 07:22 AM
Andrew, you may want to look thru this thread. (FYI, the thread I strarted was patched together with this one, so the posting order gets all mixed up).

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=227312

anyway, I added about 10 grams?? of lead in the grip where the base knuckle of my pointer finger meets the grip.

simply put, the frame is a beast on court. I've currently been hitting quite a bit with an ex-satellite player, and I could tell you the exrta mass of this frame really helps returning his heavy shots.

movdqa
08-28-2009, 07:39 AM
> Actually, one of the things most noticeable to me was how
> short Chris was hitting. Looked very different to the usually
> good depth he gets on his shots.

I had another look at his segment.

The first two or three points were serve and volley.

On the next point he served, stayed back, and then hit an approach shot and came in. This is the only shot that I saw him hit a short ball. All of the other shots of him were closeups at the baseline and I couldn't see where the shots went. I noticed that he was hitting the ball higher and assume that they landed deeper in the court on the other side.

Keifers
08-28-2009, 10:42 AM
Andrew,
I'm looking forward to your comments on the 88. Here's something I wrote in the loong thread last December (and, after playing with the racquet, still think is pretty accurate):


Quote:
Originally Posted by Keifers
I re-viewed the Sampras-Federer 2001 Wimbledon match recently with a friend. Watching them play provided a good study in contrasts between Pete's stick (heavily modified PS 85) and Roger's (not so heavily modified PS 85) -- and, I thought, gave a preview of how the K88 plays.

Particularly noteworthy were Pete's forehand drives across court and down the line -- they were very heavy and penetrating, and Roger had difficulty dealing with them on a few occasions. This is the kind of shot that the K88 (with its mass and balance) is made to hit.

Roger's racquet (and his swing) gave his forehands a lot more topspin potential. He could whip his racquet through the contact point, creating in one instance in the second set an inside-out fh passing shot that went up and then down, landing a foot inside the sideline just beyond the service line. A thoroughly modern shot that stopped Pete in his tracks.

To me, the lesson was this: Pete's racquet is a huge weapon for groundies hit with long strokes. It requires a certain amount of set up time. I'm guessing that the K88 will suit players with strokes much like Pete's, but will not be very suitable for players with more modern strokes (that involved whipping the head through the contact zone).

Keifers
08-28-2009, 10:51 AM
That's not to say more modern strokes can't be hit with the 88...

I just think it's "most suited to someone who hits quite flat and drives through their shots rather than hits up the back of the ball" and "suits someone who hits with a more 'old fashioned' technique," as you wrote above.


Would you please compare and contrast the 88 with the POG OS in your comments?

Kirko
08-28-2009, 11:23 AM
if you play a lot of tennis this where the K-88 really shines; if I were to use it again I would either play it stock or add lead in the handle like Drak did. I've always used topspin as an alternate shot eg. moonball, but with the K-88 I felt more and more encouraged to hit topspin from the back court.

quest01
08-28-2009, 12:06 PM
The K 88 is a good racquet if your at least a 4.5 level player or higher. If your not this racquet would be too demanding for you. I found the K88 good for serving and hitting a backhand slice.

roundiesee
08-28-2009, 02:33 PM
This racquet has a massive amount of power, more than any other racquet that I've hit with. I think that most players with the ability to use this racquet would have trouble keeping the ball in the court without adding a fair amount of topspin or stringing it tightly if using flat strokes. I think that this is what you'll find in reading comments in the big thread.

When I tried it, I found it to be very tension sensitive. The initial set-up was kevlar strung at 54 pounds; the first one or two sessions went ok, but by the third session, the strings had lost quite a bit of the original tension, and I had great difficulty controlling the ball, not just with drives but with other shots like touch volleys as well. My guess is that you may have to string it close to 58 pounds or thereabouts to get the maximum benefit. If you can handle the weight and find the right string and tension, it definitely is a great racket to use. Surprisingly not stiff, probably due to the thin beam.

movdqa
08-28-2009, 02:49 PM
> Surprisingly not stiff, probably due to the thin beam.

I find the KPS88 more comfortable than the K90 even though the K90 is more flexible. I attributed that to the higher weight and different distribution though I don't know the real reason.

AndrewD
08-28-2009, 08:42 PM
I had another look at his segment.
The first two or three points were serve and volley.
On the next point he served, stayed back, and then hit an approach shot and came in. This is the only shot that I saw him hit a short ball. All of the other shots of him were closeups at the baseline and I couldn't see where the shots went. I noticed that he was hitting the ball higher and assume that they landed deeper in the court on the other side.

Have a look at Chris hitting with Granville during Granville's segment- it is noticeable.

drakulie
08-28-2009, 08:56 PM
The K 88 is a good racquet if your at least a 4.5 level player or higher. If your not this racquet would be too demanding for you. I found the K88 good for serving and hitting a backhand slice.

2.5 players like you have no business being in this thread, or daring to pick up this beautiful beast of a frame.

Now go back to playing badminton.

movdqa
08-28-2009, 09:09 PM
> Have a look at Chris hitting with Granville during
> Granville's segment- it is noticeable.

Okay, I saw that and he does hit it short. I got the impression that he's using relatively short strokes and that he was a bit on his back foot for several of the shots. The KPS does work better with a longer swing. The third guy's forehand seemed better suited for the KPS.

AndrewD
08-29-2009, 12:59 AM
anyway, I added about 10 grams?? of lead in the grip where the base knuckle of my pointer finger meets the grip.
simply put, the frame is a beast on court. I've currently been hitting quite a bit with an ex-satellite player, and I could tell you the exrta mass of this frame really helps returning his heavy shots.

Thanks for that. I've been reading through it and trying to weed out the actual assessments from the anticipation and speculation.

The weight of the k88 is the reason why I'm interested in it. I've been playing the POG Mid and love it (except on volleys) but it just isn't hefty enough. Tried the kBlade and AG100 - both felt anaemic. Tried the Prestige Mid and even bought two i-Prestige Mids (one 9/10, the other unused) but need a more open string pattern. Best of the bunch is actually my old Stellar Centrecourt - a 27 year old standard size wooden racquet - but I'm not a complete masochist.

stevewcosta
08-29-2009, 03:20 PM
I'm most interested in the experience of people who have switched to the K88 as their main racquet - what alterations or adjustments they've had to make (if any) and how they've found it to perform in the key areas (serve, groundstrokes, topspin, slice, volleys, overheads).

I personally think the K would perform 10X better more HL, lower sw and slightly lower static weight (except for Pete). I play with the 6.0 and it's a much easier frame to play with, especially for quick finesse shots. I wanted this to be my replacement but I would have to trim the bumper and add lead to handle to make it work for me. Still not sure I want to deal with the process. Might have to because there's nothing like the superior PS feel...thin box beams are the best by far. Everything else is dead like hitting with rubber.

movdqa
08-29-2009, 04:25 PM
> K would perform 10X better more HL, lower sw and slightly
> lower static weight

Call TW, ask for a 12.6 oz model and add a little lead to the handle.

AndrewD
08-30-2009, 03:44 AM
Andrew,
I'm looking forward to your comments on the 88.

Firstly, let me say that the overall experience of hitting with the k88 was soured, for me, by it being strung with Wilson Sensation 16. Absolutely the worst string I have ever used. That said, I do think I was still able to get a very clear impression of the racquet.

In short, a very good racquet, but not for me.

Weight: absolutely no issues with the weight. It didn't feel significantly heavier than my old Prestige Pro (the original Prestige, circa 1987) and I had no trouble in playing six sets of doubles.

Swingweight: In truth, I remember having far more trouble swinging the Dunlop Mfil 200 than the k88. Obviously not the quickest through the air but it isn't intended to be.

Sweetspot: Large, responsive and very hard to miss.

Power: dulled by the Sensation (such irony in that name) but, as with any heavy racquet, it doesn't require massive racquet head speed to generate power.

Spin: As I suspected, better for driving through the ball than hitting up the back of it. You can certainly spin the ball but it's a heavy, not whippy, kind of spin (hopefully people will understand what I mean by that).

Control: Strung at 55lbs I found no trouble controlling the ball. The only times I had any difficulty was while adjusting to a new racquet.

Comfort: Very comfortable, no complaints.

Mobility: It isn't the most mobile racquet in the world but it certainly isn't as slow as some other racquets I've used.

Compared to other Wilson frames: I'd rank this one behind the Ultra II, 6.0 85, HPS 6.1 and 6.0 95 (that one took a long time to appreciate), in that order.

Ultimately, I prefer my POG Mid and will keep looking around for other midsize possibilities.

*** The k88 I demoed weighed in at 13.7/13.8oz before any overgrips had been added (I don't use a vibration dampner). ***

Thepowerofchoice
08-30-2009, 07:33 AM
I personally think the K would perform 10X better more HL, lower sw and slightly lower static weight (except for Pete). I play with the 6.0 and it's a much easier frame to play with, especially for quick finesse shots. I wanted this to be my replacement but I would have to trim the bumper and add lead to handle to make it work for me. Still not sure I want to deal with the process. Might have to because there's nothing like the superior PS feel...thin box beams are the best by far. Everything else is dead like hitting with rubber.

That's what I did with my racquet. Now it's 13.1 oz with 9-10 pt HL.

stevewcosta
08-30-2009, 08:00 AM
That's what I did with my racquet. Now it's 13.1 oz with 9-10 pt HL.

Wow, you must have purchased the heaviest K's is stock. Trimming the bumper still yielded 13.1 ounces? How much lead? What's the new sw? I would need a static weight around 12.5 for it to work for me.

Keifers
08-30-2009, 02:39 PM
Firstly, let me say that the overall experience of hitting with the k88 was soured, for me, by it being strung with Wilson Sensation 16. Absolutely the worst string I have ever used. That said, I do think I was still able to get a very clear impression of the racquet.

In short, a very good racquet, but not for me.

Weight: absolutely no issues with the weight. It didn't feel significantly heavier than my old Prestige Pro (the original Prestige, circa 1987) and I had no trouble in playing six sets of doubles.

Swingweight: In truth, I remember having far more trouble swinging the Dunlop Mfil 200 than the k88. Obviously not the quickest through the air but it isn't intended to be.

Sweetspot: Large, responsive and very hard to miss.

Power: dulled by the Sensation (such irony in that name) but, as with any heavy racquet, it doesn't require massive racquet head speed to generate power.

Spin: As I suspected, better for driving through the ball than hitting up the back of it. You can certainly spin the ball but it's a heavy, not whippy, kind of spin (hopefully people will understand what I mean by that).

Control: Strung at 55lbs I found no trouble controlling the ball. The only times I had any difficulty was while adjusting to a new racquet.

Comfort: Very comfortable, no complaints.

Mobility: It isn't the most mobile racquet in the world but it certainly isn't as slow as some other racquets I've used.

Compared to other Wilson frames: I'd rank this one behind the Ultra II, 6.0 85, HPS 6.1 and 6.0 95 (that one took a long time to appreciate), in that order.

Ultimately, I prefer my POG Mid and will keep looking around for other midsize possibilities.

*** The k88 I demoed weighed in at 13.7/13.8oz before any overgrips had been added (I don't use a vibration dampner). ***
Yikes, that's 388/390 grams! And you had no probs -- that's great.

Anyhoo.. interesting read. Too bad about the strings. The 88 is definitely not the 6.0 90 many of us were hoping for.

(I think of Sensation and NXT as the 2 strings that Wilson tried to get tennis shops to push. Both strings lose their playability pretty quickly -- good for Wilson and good for the shop, not so good for the customer. One difference: Sensation plays like crap right from the outset; NXT plays pretty nicely.)

stormholloway
08-30-2009, 02:51 PM
I can't stand this frame. It was a missed opportunity to make a holy grail frame. I just don't see the point of having such a heavy racquet with such a head heavy balance. You can always add weight to a frame but removing it is a different story.

What's funny is reading old reviews of the PS Tour 90 and hearing so many complaints about it being a "club" and too hefty, yet seeing so many fewer complaints about the weight of this frame, despite the massive increase in swingweight.

I still think the PS Tour 90 is the best of the new Staffs.

AndrewD
08-30-2009, 05:56 PM
Yikes, that's 388/390 grams! And you had no probs -- that's great.

Anyhoo.. interesting read. Too bad about the strings. The 88 is definitely not the 6.0 90 many of us were hoping for.

(I think of Sensation and NXT as the 2 strings that Wilson tried to get tennis shops to push. Both strings lose their playability pretty quickly -- good for Wilson and good for the shop, not so good for the customer. One difference: Sensation plays like crap right from the outset; NXT plays pretty nicely.)

Remember, it is just a basic analogue scale so you have to allow for a degree of inaccuracy. That said, it couldn't have been less than 13.5oz and I didn't have any complaints. Do I need that much weight? Not really! I think 12.5-13oz would be fine. Another ounce isn't going to be of great value but the increase in swingweight could be a nuisance. Unfortunately, the k88 doesn't give me enough room to modify based on how tired or strong I'm feeling.

AndrewD
08-30-2009, 06:03 PM
What's funny is reading old reviews of the PS Tour 90 and hearing so many complaints about it being a "club" and too hefty, yet seeing so many fewer complaints about the weight of this frame, despite the massive increase in swingweight.

I think you've missed something. When the Tour 90 came out you could still buy the PS6.0 85. In comparison the 90 didn't stack up as well for most people and certainly had none of the prestige/legacy/mythos. Today, you've only got the k90 for competition and that just doesn't have the same cache. If the 6.0 85/95 were still on the market, people would, I'm sure, react to the k88 as they did to the Tour90.

stormholloway
08-31-2009, 01:36 AM
I think you've missed something. When the Tour 90 came out you could still buy the PS6.0 85. In comparison the 90 didn't stack up as well for most people and certainly had none of the prestige/legacy/mythos. Today, you've only got the k90 for competition and that just doesn't have the same cache. If the 6.0 85/95 were still on the market, people would, I'm sure, react to the k88 as they did to the Tour90.

I would like to think they would react far worse. I think the Tour 90, in terms of weight distribution and balance is spot on. It strays with the Hyper Carbon only IMHO. This new one is just way too head heavy for me. If I could somehow carve out about .3 ounces from the head it would be perfect.

coloskier
08-31-2009, 07:25 AM
From my experience, the weight issue won't show up for a few months. After about 7 months, I am really starting to feel how heavy this racket is. That being said, I couldn't hit with any other racket in production now, because I am addicted to the plowthrough. And once you get the timing down for a whip forehand, you can destroy the ball. I hit with a semi-western forehand, and when I hit a heavy crosscourt forehand, it is usually almost unreturnable. If you hit it just right, you can get unbelievable topspin and the ball will dip and then jump at the player with power that they do not expect. Because of the weight, I will tend to be late occasionally on a backhand, but it does make for some nice (ooops) down the line backhands for winners. :)

sruckauf
08-31-2009, 02:13 PM
Would anyone care to comment on how this frame is for a two-handed backhand?

I played with the K90 for a little while and loved it, but struggled finding my mojo on that side, which is usually a solid part of my game. So, I had to part with it. Wondering if anyone is loving the K88 for 2HBH, given the weight and balance difference from the K90.

Thanks!

sureshs
08-31-2009, 02:58 PM
Problem with the K88 is that you can never switch to another frame. There just isn't any like it.

THESEXPISTOL
08-31-2009, 04:45 PM
hey give a try to the k95 18x20
When i started to take tennis seriously i was maybe a 3.0 player and was trying racquets to choose my first one..
I tried the KPS88 and i like the racquet.. But her small headsize was too demanding for my experience..
I tried the K95 and i loved it.. I bought her.
It raised my game to other level.. I'm 5.5 after 3 months (training 5 days a week during 5 hours). I developed a taste for heavy racquets thanks to K95..

I think you don't miss anything in try it.
Good luck

sruckauf
09-01-2009, 07:14 AM
Would anyone care to comment on how this frame is for a two-handed backhand?

I played with the K90 for a little while and loved it, but struggled finding my mojo on that side, which is usually a solid part of my game. So, I had to part with it. Wondering if anyone is loving the K88 for 2HBH, given the weight and balance difference from the K90.

Thanks!

Bump.. wondering if anyone has a comment on this.

quest01
09-01-2009, 10:36 AM
The K88 is the worst racquet to use for two handed backhand users. If you struggled hitting two handed backhands with the K90, your going to struggle more with a smaller headsize in the 88, that's just common sense, you should know that.

drakulie
09-01-2009, 11:05 AM
The K88 is the worst racquet to use for two handed backhand users. If you struggled hitting two handed backhands with the K90, your going to struggle more with a smaller headsize in the 88, that's just common sense, you should know that.


the kps88 and k90 are the exact same size. You should know what you are talking about before you post.

sureshs
09-01-2009, 01:30 PM
hey give a try to the k95 18x20
When i started to take tennis seriously i was maybe a 3.0 player and was trying racquets to choose my first one..
I tried the KPS88 and i like the racquet.. But her small headsize was too demanding for my experience..
I tried the K95 and i loved it.. I bought her.
It raised my game to other level.. I'm 5.5 after 3 months (training 5 days a week during 5 hours). I developed a taste for heavy racquets thanks to K95..

I think you don't miss anything in try it.
Good luck

You went from 3.0 to 5.5 in 3 months?

sruckauf
09-01-2009, 01:33 PM
The K88 is the worst racquet to use for two handed backhand users. If you struggled hitting two handed backhands with the K90, your going to struggle more with a smaller headsize in the 88, that's just common sense, you should know that.

I guess I should have been more specific about my experience with the frame, because you're generalizing what I said. The head size wasn't a problem. i.e. Hitting consistently in the sweet spot wasn't an issue for me.

What I didn't click with, with just how the general motion of the 2HBH felt with the K90. (hence, why I attempted to relay that in referencing the K88, "given the weight and balance difference from the K90")

In retrospect, I am thinking I might have been fine if I added a little lead around 10 and 2, to solid things up on that side.

Anyway, thanks for the 'helpful' post.

Kirko
09-01-2009, 02:00 PM
You went from 3.0 to 5.5 in 3 months?

3.0 to beyond a 5.0 amazing :)

gameboy
09-01-2009, 03:00 PM
I think you meant to say

3.0 to 5.0 is beyond amazing, it is physically impossible. I don't care what racquet you are using.

THESEXPISTOL
09-01-2009, 04:05 PM
You went from 3.0 to 5.5 in 3 months?

I went into a intensive tennis program during three months training 3 hours in the morning and 4 in the afternoon with one of the best coaches of my country.

quest01
09-01-2009, 04:21 PM
the kps88 and k90 are the exact same size. You should know what you are talking about before you post.

I've seen your Youtube videos, I wouldn't be talking. You need to stop playing ex satellite players and focus on playing people your own skill level which is a 2.5. I've seen your serve technique, forehand, and everything else and its terrible, find another sport like figure skating or something.

AndrewD
09-01-2009, 04:34 PM
I went into a intensive tennis program during three months training 3 hours in the morning and 4 in the afternoon with one of the best coaches of my country.

Borat, is that you ?

gameboy
09-01-2009, 04:48 PM
I went into a intensive tennis program during three months training 3 hours in the morning and 4 in the afternoon with one of the best coaches of my country.

That's interesting, because I took this intensive Internet BS program during last 4 months where I read 8 hours of Internet BS everyday, and now I am an expert Internet BS tester.

And what do you know, your posts come back BS positive!

movdqa
09-01-2009, 05:07 PM
> I went into a intensive tennis program during three
> months training 3 hours in the morning and 4 in the
> afternoon with one of the best coaches of my country.

You'd have to play a boatload of tournaments too learn the strategy, tactics, etc. that you only get to test and use in matchplay.

movdqa
09-01-2009, 05:08 PM
> the kps88 and k90 are the exact same size.

I'll see if I can snap a picture of the two together. They are the same size though. Anyone with both that's put them together has seen this.

gameboy
09-01-2009, 05:28 PM
The K88 is the worst racquet to use for two handed backhand users. If you struggled hitting two handed backhands with the K90, your going to struggle more with a smaller headsize in the 88, that's just common sense, you should know that.

I don't agree with this at all. Extra heft and two handed back hand go together naturally. Had no problems hitting solid THBH with KPS88.

quest01
09-01-2009, 06:07 PM
I don't agree with this at all. Extra heft and two handed back hand go together naturally. Had no problems hitting solid THBH with KPS88.

I didn't have any problems either hitting two handed backhands with the KPS88. I can hit more consistent backhands with other racquets for example a Babolat APDC but the KPS88 is great for hitting slice backhands.

ngoster
09-01-2009, 06:17 PM
Not sure if this is relevant, but let me preface this by mentioning that I have a semi-western grip...

I've been playing with the KPS88 for a few months now. Trying to commit from the PS85 with the mindset that once the PS85 breaks it'll be difficult to find another one without having to give up an organ in trade. I still prefer the PS85 over the KPS88. It doesn't feel as stiff and I am able to generate spin more easily giving me the sense that it is more forgiving. It is also versatile to style of play. Whether you like to grind from the baseline or serve and volley, it will get do the job well. I agree with others on the KPS88 in that it has alot of power and is tailored more towards those with flat-driving strokes. It's also a great stick for serving and volleying dued to its stiff, hefty and, thus, stable composition. Volleys are crisp and penetrating. Manuverability is good, but you can't be lazy. Here's a little snippet of me hitting volleys [I know my technique isn't the best so please be kind :)] http://staging.vimeo.com/6294038 With regards to groundies, I noticed that I have muscle the ball and drive through it in order to generate the desired spin to keep the ball in the court. Shots tend to sail long if my follow-through is abbreviated or if I try to slow down my swing. I've tried to incorporate the low-to-high-brush-the-back-of-the-ball technique to generated more topspin and control depth but it's not as easy as when I'm hitting with the PS85. Just to be objective, this may be more of a technique issue with me. Within the last week, I made a slight adjustment by closing my racquet face more and am finding some success in generating more topspin. I'm posting a short groundstoke clip as this is being typed...again, be kind...cheers :)

ngoster
09-01-2009, 06:20 PM
^^^ http://vimeo.com/6390579

sruckauf
09-01-2009, 07:27 PM
I don't agree with this at all. Extra heft and two handed back hand go together naturally. Had no problems hitting solid THBH with KPS88.

Finally! Thank you.

mg.dc
09-01-2009, 08:12 PM
I was rather surprised how nice and solid my two-handed backhand was with this racket. The weight and balance, in my view, are a nice match for the two-hander. I noticed I was able to drive the ball consistently well with less effort and a simple stroke.

drakulie
09-01-2009, 08:38 PM
I've seen your Youtube videos,o

hahahha. Stalker.

Anyway, stop giving advice to other posters when you have zero clue of anything you post on here.

gameboy
09-01-2009, 09:21 PM
I agree with others that this racquet is better suited for flatter shots. One of the reasons I ended up not picking this racquet after a week of trials was that it wasn't giving me quite the spin I was looking for. However, with a long flat stroke, this frame hit some bombs.

I believe that is also why this frame is so well suited for two handed backhand as THBH tend to be flatter than loopier one handed backhands. My backhand is much flatter than my forehand and my backhand was pretty solid with KPS88. Absolutely no problms at all.

Dgpsx7
09-01-2009, 09:44 PM
I agree with others that this racquet is better suited for flatter shots. One of the reasons I ended up not picking this racquet after a week of trials was that it wasn't giving me quite the spin I was looking for. However, with a long flat stroke, this frame hit some bombs.

I believe that is also why this frame is so well suited for two handed backhand as THBH tend to be flatter than loopier one handed backhands. My backhand is much flatter than my forehand and my backhand was pretty solid with KPS88. Absolutely no problms at all.

I agree with what you are saying for the most part but from my experience if you don't mind the weight then the racket really does a lot of work for you. The spin on it really comes out when you slice with it but I have a high topspin 1 handed backhand it works great with the KPS88. Its weird though when I use my Volkl Tour10 VE MP I feel more comfortable using a 2 handed backhand. I feel the headsize of the KPS88 may be too small for a 2hbh although I don't mind it for any one handed shots. At the same time I can see how someone could have a great 2hbh with it because it drops bombs.

dannyjjang
09-01-2009, 11:26 PM
hey give a try to the k95 18x20
When i started to take tennis seriously i was maybe a 3.0 player and was trying racquets to choose my first one..
I tried the KPS88 and i like the racquet.. But her small headsize was too demanding for my experience..
I tried the K95 and i loved it.. I bought her.
It raised my game to other level.. I'm 3.5 after 3 months (training 5 days a week during 5 hours). I developed a taste for heavy racquets thanks to K95..

I think you don't miss anything in try it.
Good luck)

much more realistic now...


or maybe you were 5.0 to begin with who became 5.5 in 3 month, oh wait you never took tennis seriously until 3 months ago....

OTMPut
09-02-2009, 01:03 AM
I have been hitting with KPS88 since Feb. I tried a few different set ups and now settled on full ALU Power Rough @ 51 lbs.

I cannot really think of playing with another racket.