PDA

View Full Version : Sub $100 rackets that are claimed to be pro's choice


New Daddy
08-31-2009, 09:25 AM
I'm in the process of selecting a new racket.
As I peruse through online shops, I noticed that some of (what appear to be) second-tier line ups are claimed to be used by top pros.
For example, Prince O3 White is advertised as Sharapova's racket.
Assuming that sub $100 rackets lack technology, material or whatever that a manufacturer's $200 top-of-the-line products, what accounts for tour pros' choice of these second-line products?
Were these rackets once a manufacturer's top models that have over the years become obsolete and less pricey?
Or do pros after all not need the most expensive, most cutting-edge rackets after all by compensating with their skills?

GS
08-31-2009, 09:51 AM
First off, Daddy-O, what is your approximate tennis level, and what racquet have you been using recently? Then some of us might be able to help you.

sstchur
08-31-2009, 09:54 AM
I'm in the process of selecting a new racket.
As I peruse through online shops, I noticed that some of (what appear to be) second-tier line ups are claimed to be used by top pros.
For example, Prince O3 White is advertised as Sharapova's racket.
Assuming that sub $100 rackets lack technology, material or whatever that a manufacturer's $200 top-of-the-line products, what accounts for tour pros' choice of these second-line products?
Were these rackets once a manufacturer's top models that have over the years become obsolete and less pricey?
Or do pros after all not need the most expensive, most cutting-edge rackets after all by compensating with their skills?

Most of the "technology" is just marketing bull. There are plenty of great frames that don't have a lot of "technology." Pros often use something entirely different than what the manufacturer would have you believe anyway. They are often older, classic racquets, without all the "new technology" and are just painted to look like the new offerings (to get people to buy them!).

But more to the point, don't be concerned with what pro uses what racquet. Look for a quality racquet that suits your playing level. You won't play any better if a pro happens to use the racquet you use.

BreakPoint
08-31-2009, 09:55 AM
First of all, most pros don't use the retail versions of racquets that are sold to the public. They use mostly custom made racquets with the paintjob of a retail racquet or are using older models no longer sold to retail with the paintjob of the latest retail version.

Secondly, some racquets may be cheaper now (such as the Prince O3 White) because they are discontinued perhaps because a new version will be soon released. That, of course, doesn't mean there's any wrong or inferior about the racquet since it was once sold for a much higher price when they were first introduced. It just means that they are trying to clear out the remaining stock of the old version to make room for the new upcoming models.

New Daddy
08-31-2009, 09:59 AM
First off, Daddy-O, what is your approximate tennis level, and what racquet have you been using recently? Then some of us might be able to help you.

I'm 4.0, and I've been using Babolat PD, which has been giving me so much elbow pain lately. That's why I'm looking to switch.

BreakPoint
08-31-2009, 10:04 AM
I'm 4.0, and I've been using Babolat PD, which has been giving me so much elbow pain lately. That's why I'm looking to switch.
In that case, you should be looking at a heavier and more flexible frame. And if you're using poly strings, stop using them immediately and switch to a softer string like a multi nylon syn gut or natural gut.

GS
08-31-2009, 10:44 AM
Sell that Pure Drive immediately. It's commonly known as an arm-wrecker.
If you're cheap like me (it's a recession, and I like 4 identical racquets in my bag), then demo something like the Head Radical MP or the Prince Warrior MP.
$69.95? Nice price. Then string it up with a soft multi.

New Daddy
08-31-2009, 11:00 AM
Pros often use something entirely different than what the manufacturer would have you believe anyway. They are often older, classic racquets, without all the "new technology" and are just painted to look like the new offerings (to get people to buy them!).


I've heard something like that said over and over. But wouldn't it be fraud for manufacturers to claim such and such racket is being used by so and so pros, when the actual rackets used by pros are something entirely different? I'm not particularly a ardent believer in the honesty of sports manufacturers, but I'm not sure they would risk law suits, reputation damages, etc., by employing such an easily discoverable marketing scam.

GS
08-31-2009, 11:10 AM
This is why most pros have paintjobs over their favorite racquets---they can "legally" get paid for playing with their endorsed sticks, while playing with the ones (or the moulds) they've played with for years. Pro tennis is the job these guys have chosen---would you take a chance with a new model when you have confidence (and tournament wins) with your trusty old one?

Nellie
08-31-2009, 11:14 AM
well, the cost for making a frame, is likely about $10, so most of the cost is mark up and middle men. There are plenty of last years racquets you could buy for cheap. also, the most expensive racquets are the game improvement racquets. The pro racquets tend to be the most basic, made to be soft to allow hours of practice, heavy to be stable, and dependable to have a predictable response. Me - I would never play with a 13 oz. racquet because I don't play enough to have that kind of arm strength.

By the way, I find the Pure drive to be a very comfortable racquet due to the woofer grommets. If your arm bothers you, try softer strings at a lower tension. I went to gut at 40lbs for a while when I hurt my shoulder. Strings are much more important than racquet, and it is cheap to try. Also, your technique, obviously should be looked at by a pro - also cheaper than buying a new racquet.

BreakPoint
08-31-2009, 11:29 AM
I've heard something like that said over and over. But wouldn't it be fraud for manufacturers to claim such and such racket is being used by so and so pros, when the actual rackets used by pros are something entirely different? I'm not particularly a ardent believer in the honesty of sports manufacturers, but I'm not sure they would risk law suits, reputation damages, etc., by employing such an easily discoverable marketing scam.
But it's not technically lying because they either say so-and-so pro "endorses this racquet" or that it's "his racquet of choice" or that he "uses some model name".

In Case #1: They never say that he uses this exact model on the pro tour but only that he "endorses" this racquet, meaning that he puts his name behind this racquet, that's all.

Case #2: They don't say that he uses this racquet himself on the tour but that if you asked the pro what racquet you should choose, he would say you should choose this one, therefore, it's his "racquet of choice".

Case #3: The racquet that the pro actually uses can be named anything that they want as there's no law against giving the same name to different racquets. Therefore, the pro does indeed use a "Wilson K-Blade Tour" or whatever, it's just not the same "Wilson K-Blade Tour" that you can buy in the stores.

Also, nobody has ever sued them so why shouldn't they just keep doing what they're doing until someone actually sues them? It would be hard for someone to claim that the product caused them injury because it was not the same one used by the pros, as that's the basis of most product lawsuits.

KOtennis
08-31-2009, 05:22 PM
a good "player" frame under $100 right now would be Dunlop AG100.
New 4D AG100 is coming out soon, thus the sale price.

Everyone's been trying to pick these up.

THESEXPISTOL
08-31-2009, 05:28 PM
I bought 3xHead Extreme Pro 2008 100$ each and with leadtape it's gold for my game.