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bab pure drive roddick
09-01-2009, 04:33 PM
hey everyone, a guy at my academy broke a string today and i have been stringing rackets for about a month now. i told him to give it to me to string but he said that stringing natural gut is different and i couldn't do it. is that true?

Valjean
09-01-2009, 04:51 PM
Gut is expensive, and can break on its own, or just due to how you tie it off. Some shops won't handle it and still others only let the manager do it then. OTOH, once you know how, there's no reason you shouldn't be able to.

madeinargentina
09-01-2009, 05:22 PM
Es lo mismo que encordar una tripa sintética o un multifilamento
Vas a tener que tener mas precaución para no hacer friccionar las cuerdas
Podés pre-tensar las cuerdas para tener mejores resultados, saludos.

i suck at tennis
09-01-2009, 05:23 PM
I've been stringing for about 8 months now, and just strung my first gut job, or half job (gut mains and syngut crosses). I was nervous about it, but as long as you take your time and make sure the string does not get kinked it shouldnt be a problem.

What the guy said about you not being able to do it is absolutely not true, but whether or not he wants you to do it is another story. If he doesnt, big deal, just a little more free time to do whatever you want!

jim e
09-01-2009, 05:41 PM
The first racquet I ever strung was all gut, Victor Imperial Gut, back in 1968. The person teaching me to string was there, he knew that was my string at that time and I should string my own, and it went fine.He told me after that I could string anything out there.
You do need to take extra precautions, one of the biggest is to avoid kinks in the string(I usually do a light manual prestretch of the gut to eliminate coil memory, it makes life easier and les chance of a kink),with gut I normally string it as a 2 piece job, as there is less handeling of the string that way, but thats an individule preference.I always string the crosses top down as well even if the racquet you have allows bottom up,as the gut gets handled less on the top and thats where most of the hitting is. And the knots, be sure to hand pull only! Others here will tell you it is okay to pull with pliers or starting clamp, and that is fine but once every so often gut will get ruined by doing this as it can snap, and tying a good cinched up knot is possible using your fingers only, as there is no reason to over pull the knot as it will cinch up only so much, the rest puts extra stress on the string, learn the so called Parnell knot, as that cinches up nicely with your fingers.
The last couple cross strings you have to be very careful with as the string can unravel if it is overhandled, and if you do that, you will see it untwist, you would then need to retwist the string. This does not happen that much as it once did in the past, as todays guts have a coating to protect it so its less of an issue now,but can still happen so on the last couple crosses sometimes you need to pull the string all the way through each weave like you were sewing to keep the string from untwisting on the last cross string
Just be careful and you will be okay, just don't be rough with it , take your time and it will go well with no problems.If you rush, and pull hard when it kinks, and you can ruin an expensive piece of string, so take your time and go for it.

Oh, one more thing, if your machine has a diablo(nosecone), its best to use it, as it puts less stress on the string, as the tension jaws don't have to apply as much tension to hold the string, and the string will enter the tension clamp at the same angle. Also, if you have to pull a string twice for any reason, I will then wrap the gut two times around the diablo the second time as that way the tension clamp will be at a different spot on the string, so less wear is placed in one spot.I do take extra precautions, but I string a lot of nat. gut, and my jobs lasts, as I would not like these strings to snap before they should, and my gut clients knows that.Thats one of a # of reasons I have to charge extra for gut stringing labor, I can list a few good reasons for that, but thats another topic.
Once you get the hang of how the string is, you will be okay, and not be scared of it. Offering nat. gut to your clients is offering the best of the best, you just have to be careful, and pay attention to what you are doing as synthetics can take more abuse while you are stringing it. Be careful and you will be okay.

Irvin
09-01-2009, 06:29 PM
I don't see any reason you could not string gut string. You do have to be extra careful because each set costs about $42 now and it is easy to kink or break. If you clamps are not adjusted properly you could damage the string pretty easy. Pay attention to 'jim e's' comments.

Think about it though. How much are you going to charge your friend? What if you break the gut while stringing and have to buy two sets?

Irvin

eldub20
09-01-2009, 06:57 PM
Thanks Jim for sharing your knowledge with us newbies...I usually use a starting clamp (Alpha) when stringing syn gut or poly to back up my anchor clamp on the first pull...is it still a good practice with natural gut?
I guess I'm a little worried that the dimples (not sure if it's the proper term) on the clamping surface of my starting clamp could damage the NG??

Thanks!

jim e
09-01-2009, 07:38 PM
Thanks Jim for sharing your knowledge with us newbies...I usually use a starting clamp (Alpha) when stringing syn gut or poly to back up my anchor clamp on the first pull...is it still a good practice with natural gut?
I guess I'm a little worried that the dimples (not sure if it's the proper term) on the clamping surface of my starting clamp could damage the NG??

Thanks!

You will be fine using that clamp to back up your anchor clamp, I also do that.I also use the starting clamp to start the cross strings.I use the starting clamp on all 2 piece for starting crosses.

On another stringers forum, someone who attended the stringers symposium in Orlando said that the USRSA will be updating their recommended procedure...a starting clamp is now the way to go, over using a starting knot.
You would not be tying off on a main string, and then pulling tension against it.Less chance of snapping main string.
When using thin gut or other 'fragile' multifilament strings, and especially at higher tensions, it is not uncommon to snap that first cross string right at the knot or at the two sharp turns the string makes, With using a starting clamp, you do not pull tension against these turns. A starting knot may be a thing of the past from the info. given there

ryangoring
09-01-2009, 08:35 PM
hey jim-e how and what is pre stretch?
thanks

jim e
09-01-2009, 08:55 PM
hey jim-e how and what is pre stretch?
thanks

I prestretch gut by hand only. Usually I clamp one end to my machine clamp(I have a heavy machine), and walk back with the string(be careful that you do not kink it walking back), at the end, I pull back on the string, and you can feel the string stretch, it just feels different.Some will just tie it to something like a door handle. You just have to pull it back a while(few seconds, approx. 10 seconds give or take, as thats a personel preference, as I only do a light one), and that will reduce the coil memory, and that will make the stringing easier.Thats the main reason I prestretch, not to increase the tension maintenance as some do.So I only give it a light prestretch only, just to eliminate some of the coil memory., it will not get rid of it all but a decent amount.

I never used the prestretch function on the machine, some use it to help with tension maintenance,but I feel it is worthless. The machine prestretch pulls back a set % that you set it for, overpulls it by that % then relaxes back. Problem is with friction it may not relax back the entire amount, especially with the friction of the crosses against the mains,or friction against the gromments, and that will give a higher tension than desired and an uneven stringbed tension, as the frictional amount can vary giving you inconsistancies, and stringers strive for consistancy as best as possible.Now this is just my thoughts on machine prestretch, no scientific data to support it, so take it as you may.

Yulitle has a video here on hand prestretching. this video explains it to you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=praasXlb0Ls&fmt=18

SpinDog
09-02-2009, 06:21 AM
If you’re just starting out with gut I would suggest using only the highest quality gut available. It may seem counter intuitive but the stringing process will go smoother and there will be less chance that you’ll run into a problem requiring an expensive redo. I haven’t been stringing for all that long but use VS exclusively and have never had a problem. Just follow the good advice listed previously by these knowledgeable folks (as I did) and you’ll enjoy stringing with gut. Good luck.

Sangria Munky
09-02-2009, 07:19 AM
I played with my gut under damp conditions yesterday and used the hairdryer. When I used it the next day, it became stiff. What should I do?

goran_ace
09-02-2009, 07:29 AM
Don't do it. You are a stringing rookie, never strung gut before, and its for someone else. Irvin's comment nailed it right on the head.

The reason why some people refuse to string gut or only have the manager do it is because its not worth the risk. You only stand to make $10-15 on the labor. If you break the gut while stringing you are out $40.

If you want to string gut for others, I would recommend trying it a few times on your own, and making sure to have a couple sets of gut in stock in case you need to replace it.

drakulie
09-02-2009, 07:31 AM
I played with my gut under damp conditions yesterday and used the hairdryer. When I used it the next day, it became stiff. What should I do?


Jeez! Hair dryer?? :shock:

Just use a dry cloth next time your strings get damp.

Irvin
09-02-2009, 08:12 AM
I played with my gut under damp conditions yesterday and used the hairdryer. When I used it the next day, it became stiff. What should I do?

LMAO!!! Well if your strings go loose on you now you know how you can tighten them up.

Irvin

diredesire
09-02-2009, 11:57 AM
Don't do it. You are a stringing rookie, never strung gut before, and its for someone else. Irvin's comment nailed it right on the head.

The reason why some people refuse to string gut or only have the manager do it is because its not worth the risk. You only stand to make $10-15 on the labor. If you break the gut while stringing you are out $40.

If you want to string gut for others, I would recommend trying it a few times on your own, and making sure to have a couple sets of gut in stock in case you need to replace it.

I'm an open minded guy, and I think that new stringers CAN string gut, but I have to agree. There are a lot of things we can only learn through experience, and a stringer with a month's experience (which could mean anything from 2-20 frames) might want to have a supervisor, or to at least be prepared to foot the bill if the string breaks.

if you are really determined to string the gut, like has been mentioned:

Don't kink the string. Don't let it bend too hard. Weave one ahead to reduce burning. Wax the mains if you have any on hand, a light coating will do. Prestretch if you want (reduce coil memory, i don't, though). Check out drakulie's tip on weaving the crosses, it's a good practice.

On knots: Tie them off by hand, and don't be too rough.

I agree, there is a risk there, and I don't think you want to go into this one ill prepared unless you have a spare set of gut on hand (just in case) and/or you've made plenty of mistakes and know how to avoid them in the past :)

jim e
09-02-2009, 01:25 PM
All stringers have to start sometime stringing gut,especially if they string for others, as it is the best string out there.
Be forewarned about pricing out your labor!
I know others here posted they will not go to a stringer that charges more for gut labor. Maybe they will get the less experienced stringers, and get what they pay for, and thats fine..
Yes gut stringing takes a little longer, but after stringing it a good # of times the time is not that significant, you always do have to be a little more careful,and pay attention to details, even the small ones, like double wrapping the string over the diablo when you need to pull the string twice, so not to put the tension head on the same spot on the string twice, so there is a time factor and a caring factor(I have seen some sloppy stringers in some stores, and its enough to make you sick).
Things happen and sometimes a client will bring one back(nat. gut job), in a very short time with a broken string, and ask for a redo. At times you will have no idea what went wrong. Example: 1st time this happened to me many years back, I appologised to the customer, restrung it at no charge, and strung it immediately! Later found out from someone else that this person picked up a stone from the parking lot next to the courts and hit that stone with the gut strings and snap!Nat gut even back then was expensive.This is just one example, think of the times it breaks and you have no clue, weather it be a shank or whatever. There will be some freebees if you string enough gut, just like any other string,and the string is expensive, and seems like its going up all the time!
Its your time, and your inventory to keep those expensive strings on hand(I have approx. $1300.00 worth of just gut on inventory),if you have clients asking for this string, you do what you want, but my opinion is to charge accordingly, especially if you can predictably, and consistantly give your best job on the racquets, and you are stringing the best of the best. It's your reputation.Also if you do string for clients, and include gut, be sure it is quality gut, as some posters here had global snap in the case before they ever hit(possibly stringer error, but how do you know for sure, as some say that they received dry brittle batches, and its your reputation on the line, is it worth it to give them a cheap gut and have something go wrong, not yet for me, as it has to be proven over time before I start that).My gut jobs typically lasts, and my clients know that.Fortunately I have not gotten a fast string breaker asking for gut as yet.
Just some thoughts to take into consideration.If you do string the best gut, I would not give it away, as it is your time, your inventory that you spent your money on, and your risk that the job will last.

eldub20
09-02-2009, 01:47 PM
You will be fine using that clamp to back up your anchor clamp, I also do that.I also use the starting clamp to start the cross strings.I use the starting clamp on all 2 piece for starting crosses.

On another stringers forum, someone who attended the stringers symposium in Orlando said that the USRSA will be updating their recommended procedure...a starting clamp is now the way to go, over using a starting knot.
You would not be tying off on a main string, and then pulling tension against it.Less chance of snapping main string.
When using thin gut or other 'fragile' multifilament strings, and especially at higher tensions, it is not uncommon to snap that first cross string right at the knot or at the two sharp turns the string makes, With using a starting clamp, you do not pull tension against these turns. A starting knot may be a thing of the past from the info. given there

I use the starting clamp as well for crosses on all 2 piece jobs...thanks for the additional info. ;)

ryangoring
09-03-2009, 06:58 AM
I prestretch gut by hand only. Usually I clamp one end to my machine clamp(I have a heavy machine), and walk back with the string(be careful that you do not kink it walking back), at the end, I pull back on the string, and you can feel the string stretch, it just feels different.Some will just tie it to something like a door handle. You just have to pull it back a while(few seconds, approx. 10 seconds give or take, as thats a personel preference, as I only do a light one), and that will reduce the coil memory, and that will make the stringing easier.Thats the main reason I prestretch, not to increase the tension maintenance as some do.So I only give it a light prestretch only, just to eliminate some of the coil memory., it will not get rid of it all but a decent amount.

I never used the prestretch function on the machine, some use it to help with tension maintenance,but I feel it is worthless. The machine prestretch pulls back a set % that you set it for, overpulls it by that % then relaxes back. Problem is with friction it may not relax back the entire amount, especially with the friction of the crosses against the mains,or friction against the gromments, and that will give a higher tension than desired and an uneven stringbed tension, as the frictional amount can vary giving you inconsistancies, and stringers strive for consistancy as best as possible.Now this is just my thoughts on machine prestretch, no scientific data to support it, so take it as you may.

Yulitle has a video here on hand prestretching. this video explains it to you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=praasXlb0Ls&fmt=18

Thanks Jim e