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View Full Version : spray gut with lacquer for durability??


tennis50
09-01-2009, 08:48 PM
What do people use to enhance durability for natural gut string? Can a lacquer spray work? What do you guys think?

CHOcobo
09-01-2009, 09:04 PM
lacquer spray cans? those chemical chips once they dry out. having them chipping from you racket you'll definitely inhale them. you could get cancer from that if inhale enough.

jim e
09-01-2009, 09:12 PM
Years ago there was a product called gut life. It was in a spray can, and was used to protect the nat. gut strings. Over time it turned the strings a yellow color, and overall was not that big in my area.But back then, nat. gut did not have the nice coatings that todays do. So with the coatings now on the strings, I would just use the strings just as they are, rather than spray on something that may effect the playability of the strings. The strings will eventually need to be replaced after a while no matter what you do, unless you do not use them. Best to use them as they are, as thats what the strings are designed for. When they wear out then restring.

rogernext
09-01-2009, 11:01 PM
Use bacon or animal fat

SoCal10s
09-01-2009, 11:29 PM
make a brush on lacquer stuff yourself.. back in the days .. pro shops used to brush on a mixture of 1/3 lacquer and 2/3 denatured alcohol or something like that and they brush it on after the string job and you'd have swing the racket through the air to let it dry.. you'd get a nice little high when smelling the stuff...

maybe some old-timers can correct me about the mixture,but I'm like 70% sure that was the mix...

000KFACTOR90000
09-01-2009, 11:53 PM
Or just get pacific tough gut or klip armourpro if you want more life out of your gut.

v205
09-02-2009, 12:47 AM
Castor oil

Irvin
09-02-2009, 02:50 AM
What's next embalming fluid? If I spent $40 for strings I would think they would come in a package ready to be put in the racket. If there was anything needed to protect the string's life I would think it would be listed on the package. If you really want to keep them from wearing out leave them in the package or better yet the cow.

Irvin

jim e
09-02-2009, 04:49 AM
What's next embalming fluid? If I spent $40 for strings I would think they would come in a package ready to be put in the racket. If there was anything needed to protect the string's life I would think it would be listed on the package. If you really want to keep them from wearing out leave them in the package or better yet the cow.

Irvin

I agree!! The strings are meant to be used the way they are. Back in the days there was no coatings on the strings when you purchased them. Why take away from a good set of string by putting on another substance, as the strings will wear down in time anyways, as all strings eventually need to be replaced.Even say if it does prolong the life 1/2 an hour, how do you know what it does to the playability. You are hitting with gut for its playability, so why use something that may possibly effect that.I can't believe someone would put on bacon fat! Maybe they would like to leave it outdoors for a while and see if the odor would attract any animals that might want to chew on it for a while when you were not looking.Maybe someones dog could come by and just take off with the racquet while you were not looking, now that would be nice, as you would not see your strings break.
Bacon fat!Whats next? Maybe a little mayo?

rasajadad
09-02-2009, 06:14 AM
Grade B Lanolin. Used to be able to be purchased at a pharmacy.

drakulie
09-02-2009, 06:55 AM
What's next embalming fluid? If I spent $40 for strings I would think they would come in a package ready to be put in the racket. If there was anything needed to protect the string's life I would think it would be listed on the package. If you really want to keep them from wearing out leave them in the package or better yet the cow.

Irvin


LOL. :)

I agree. Just go out and play guys. have fun.

SpinDog
09-02-2009, 06:58 AM
...Maybe someones dog could come by and just take off with the racquet while you were not looking, ...


...or WORSE:

http://www.photoshoppix.com/modules/coppermine/albums/userpics/10088/normal_dog-tennis.jpg

tennis50
09-02-2009, 08:05 AM
Magnificent! I have to say, as I was reading the responses, I was laughing so hard I was crying and my side started to hurt. Those responses were magnificent. I loved the one about the animals walking off with your racquet.

I will just play the gut without the BLT. This thread should be a must read for every aspiring comic. No sarcasm intended!

jim e
09-02-2009, 01:41 PM
Magnificent! I have to say, as I was reading the responses, I was laughing so hard I was crying and my side started to hurt. Those responses were magnificent. I loved the one about the animals walking off with your racquet.

I will just play the gut without the BLT. This thread should be a must read for every aspiring comic. No sarcasm intended!

Glad to see that its taken in humor.
Heck, if the guy likes bacon with his gut, maybe he should have taken a thick slice black pepper bacon, wrap it around an inch and a half piece of beef tenderloin, and tie it with a 16g. nat gut string(for durability), and be sure to use a Parnell knot cinched up nicely, as you do not want it to come undone, and toss it on the grill.Now there's a use for bacon and nat. gut.

SoCal10s
09-02-2009, 02:00 PM
gut.

jim e : do you know about that mixture I wrote about? almost every tennis shop back in the 60s and 70s used that stuff and brushed it on the gut and sometimes nylon strings after a new string job.....

jim e
09-02-2009, 02:32 PM
jim e : do you know about that mixture I wrote about? almost every tennis shop back in the 60s and 70s used that stuff and brushed it on the gut and sometimes nylon strings after a new string job.....

I vaguely remember some mixture that was mixed. I use to use the arosol can of a product called "gut life", and that stuff would turn the strings a yellow color after a while.Some asked for it, and others did not. Afterwords everyone just used the strings as they were meant to be, and did nothing.
Since you are going back to the past, I remember ashaways string from early 70's, still have an unused reel, and there was a note as there was a shortage of nylon during that era,don't know if you remember that, (I'm sure it was made to increase prices only), and the reel had 2 lengths of string in the reel because of the so called shortage, so they included a set of 33' to compensate(as 33' was needed for the woodies back then), and other string companies did the same. Brings back memories. Used an old Serrano machine back then, and strung a massive # of racquets then, as I was the only stringer in the area at that time.

SoCal10s
09-02-2009, 02:57 PM
^^^ I strung a wood racket with a table clamp and 2 awls(ice picks) and a wooden dowel wrap with a leather grip with a hole drilled through for the string catch.. that was fun.. I remember those Seranos .. I never saw any of those pro stringer adjust the Serano weights for exact string tensions :).. in those days no one could tell the difference how tight the strings were..

jim e
09-02-2009, 03:41 PM
^^^ I use to tie an elastic strap to a small dumbell weight to the end weights for my tie off strings back then. Back then it was even more common for stringers to pull on the end mains, and they actually judged the job by that. Maybe they had nothing else to look for to judge, who knows. The old timer that taught me to string back in 1968 (he sold me the Serrano), had a racquet clamp as you described, and he also wrapped the string around a large wooden dowel to pull tension, and had a couple awls to stick in the holes to maintain tension, and he told me he strung since he was a little kid, and that if someone asked for 55 lbs, he could pull that, and if they wanted 60, he would pull that as he said he strung that way for years.I saw him actually string a racquet that technique, that day he taught me to string.He also taught me the now called Parnell knot back then as well.That was 41 years ago! I wish the time clock would slow down!

Heres a package of Bow Brand Gut from the woodie days, and note, it came in 2-17' sections as that was the length to string woodies up.You needed different lengths than this for the T-2000 racquets, and it did not take me long to refuse to string those with gut at high tensions! Notice that they spelled racquet as racket on the package.No coating on this stuff.
Anyways , I bet the string could still be used and playable. It's at least 37 years old.Bow Brand and Victor Imperial were the 2 big sellers for me.
http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h111/JimandKim/STRING.jpg

Lefty78
09-03-2009, 08:34 AM
^ I see the package says 15g, but man that string looks thick! Don't think I'd be able to resist the temptation to string it up though. And thanks for sharing the stories, jim and socal. Good stuff.

Frank Silbermann
05-25-2010, 04:31 AM
About thirty years ago I had gut strings put in a wooden racket, and the lacquer that was sprayed or brushed on locked the strings in place so they never wore. (I like loose, dead strings). No pre-coated string is going to have that property.

I'm hoping that thin, loose, old gut strings permanently locked together will give me a soft (i.e. elbow-protective) feel without trampolining or frequent replacement due to sawing.

make a brush on lacquer stuff yourself.. back in the days .. pro shops used to brush on a mixture of 1/3 lacquer and 2/3 denatured alcohol or something like that and they brush it on after the string job and you'd have swing the racket through the air to let it dry.. you'd get a nice little high when smelling the stuff...

maybe some old-timers can correct me about the mixture,but I'm like 70% sure that was the mix... I read that there are several kinds of lacquer -- water based, oil based, turpentine based, etc. What kind of lacquer is appropriate for gut tennis strings?

Can anyone confirm whether so much alcohol was used?

toeknee
05-25-2010, 12:48 PM
I use wax, hard wax, such as candle wax. I rub on the wax after stringing and use a hair blow dryer ON LOW HEAT to GENTLY melt the wax into the strings. This is especially great for frying and dried out gut. It will not only make the old strings look new again, but restore that lively fresh gut feel. Another bonus of the wax is the added slippage which prolongs the life of the gut and aids in string movements. Adding wax and applying heat is ONLY recommended when using a full bed of gut or, in my case, gut/kevlar. i wouldnt even think about applying heat to a poly or a syn...

Pusher 1
05-25-2010, 08:59 PM
I still have some of the Babolat lacquer and they still make it.

It holds the strings in place. Prolongs stringlife.

rj.laroza
05-25-2010, 09:39 PM
I use wax, hard wax, such as candle wax. I rub on the wax after stringing and use a hair blow dryer ON LOW HEAT to GENTLY melt the wax into the strings. This is especially great for frying and dried out gut. It will not only make the old strings look new again, but restore that lively fresh gut feel. Another bonus of the wax is the added slippage which prolongs the life of the gut and aids in string movements. Adding wax and applying heat is ONLY recommended when using a full bed of gut or, in my case, gut/kevlar. i wouldnt even think about applying heat to a poly or a syn...

might make the racket a little bit more head heavy and the string play a little more stiff...

im with everyone else here that say to leave gut the way it is. its made to be as comfortable and soft as possible. im even against colored gut, or colored string. its just extra stuff added to string to make it look different.

scotus
05-25-2010, 10:25 PM
Just use string savers as needed.

Frank Silbermann
05-26-2010, 05:18 AM
I still have some of the Babolat lacquer and they still make it.

It holds the strings in place. Prolongs stringlife. Who still sells it? I only found one vender via Google, and when I tried to buy it I got a pop-up saying, "This product is not available."

(Otherwise, I'd still like to know which non-specific lacquer product I could use.) String savers help reduce wear, but they don't _lock_ the strings in place -- which is what I want.

JT_2eighty
05-26-2010, 08:29 AM
What do people use to enhance durability for natural gut string? Can a lacquer spray work? What do you guys think?

Babolat string savers. I get an extra 10+ hours on full gut jobs when i apply those liberally. Plus the added benefit of less string movement with them, and they seem to add a slight stiffness to the stringbed which seems to aid in control.

Nevermind all this lacquer, spray, oil, whatever. The farthest I'd go is waxing mains before stringing crosses... and this may also aid in string life since the main factor that contributes to string breakage is Friction.

toeknee
05-26-2010, 10:48 PM
might make the racket a little bit more head heavy and the string play a little more stiff...

im with everyone else here that say to leave gut the way it is. its made to be as comfortable and soft as possible. im even against colored gut, or colored string. its just extra stuff added to string to make it look different.

adding wax actually makes it play more softer and more lively..