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TripleB
10-08-2009, 11:10 AM
I know...probably best to go to a pro and let him instruct me on the proper way to play doubles but...more than likely not going to happen.

Been a singles 'specialist' for about 36 years so in doubles I typically serve, stay back, bang groundstrokes, and pass the net guy (when and if I can). Works very well until I come up against a combined 9.5 doubles team and they obliterate me and my partner. So now I'm thinking it might be a good idea to learn proper doubles so I'm less likely to get my partner killed...really like the guy.

So, can anyone recommend a quality 'Doubles' book?

Thanks.

TripleB

LuckyR
10-08-2009, 11:12 AM
I know...probably best to go to a pro and let him instruct me on the proper way to play doubles but...more than likely not going to happen.

Been a singles 'specialist' for about 36 years so in doubles I typically serve, stay back, bang groundstrokes, and pass the net guy (when and if I can). Works very well until I come up against a combined 9.5 doubles team and they obliterate me and my partner. So now I'm thinking it might be a good idea to learn proper doubles so I'm less likely to get my partner killed...really like the guy.

So, can anyone recommend a quality 'Doubles' book?

Thanks.

TripleB

Sounds like you need a primer not a graduate text, so: The Art of Doubles, first ed.

5263
10-08-2009, 11:36 AM
Pat Blaskower, I think

Cindysphinx
10-08-2009, 01:07 PM
Sounds like you need a primer not a graduate text, so: The Art of Doubles, first ed.

Repeat: First edition only. Second edition is different and not good.

4sound
10-08-2009, 02:02 PM
Unlimited Doubles
By Steve Tourdo

SystemicAnomaly
10-08-2009, 03:52 PM
The old Operation Doubles web site was an excellent site on tennis doubles, tennis strokes and other tennis-related subjects. Since Kathy Krajco's passing last year(?), the site has been allowed to be discontinued. Fortunately, much of that web site has been archived and can be found here:

http://web.archive.org/web/20070928002759/www.operationdoubles.com

http://web.archive.org/web/20071023033300/www.operationdoubles.com/how_to_play_tennis_tips.htm


The Tennis 4 You web site also has some of her articles published.
.

TripleB
10-08-2009, 06:33 PM
Sounds like you need a primer not a graduate text, so: The Art of Doubles, first ed.

Repeat: First edition only. Second edition is different and not good.

Thanks...ordered the 1st edition for under $7.00 in Like New Condition. I appreciate the help.

TripleB

wyutani
10-08-2009, 06:39 PM
the art of doubles by p blaskower

SystemicAnomaly
10-09-2009, 01:17 PM
I wouldn't ignore the Operation Doubles stuff. Bungalo Bill has indicated that he had downloaded everything on the old OD site. Sounds like a ringing (implied) endorsement from BB himself.

LuckyR
10-09-2009, 01:32 PM
Thanks...ordered the 1st edition for under $7.00 in Like New Condition. I appreciate the help.

TripleB

Post back when you are interested in more nuance.

smoothtennis
10-09-2009, 02:15 PM
I am 4.0 that joined a 4.5 team this year, so I got The Art of Doubles to kind of get my mind working in the right direction. The book has been very helpful, even though the organization of the book is not exactly the best.

The only other thing I would say about this book is appears to have been written by a woman, and some of the her hard and fast statements seem to belong to 3.5 tennis, such as you never need topspin groundies ,or topspin lobs. Sorry ,from my past 4 matches, those hard topspin dippers have decided an awful lot of points for all teams.

Oh, and be warned - this book is a 'specific system' of doubles called California Doubles by some. It is based on a staggered formation to prevnet crosscourt lobs, and the team NEVER plays two up - someone is always staggered behind the net person.

Whether you choose to play that way or not, the book still have some great ideas on court movement and shot selection.

smoothtennis
10-09-2009, 02:16 PM
Post back when you are interested in more nuance.

Feel free to share!

5263
10-09-2009, 02:36 PM
What is prevnet?

Cindysphinx
10-09-2009, 06:35 PM
I am 4.0 that joined a 4.5 team this year, so I got The Art of Doubles to kind of get my mind working in the right direction. The book has been very helpful, even though the organization of the book is not exactly the best.

The only other thing I would say about this book is appears to have been written by a woman, and some of the her hard and fast statements seem to belong to 3.5 tennis, such as you never need topspin groundies ,or topspin lobs. Sorry ,from my past 4 matches, those hard topspin dippers have decided an awful lot of points for all teams.

Oh, and be warned - this book is a 'specific system' of doubles called California Doubles by some. It is based on a staggered formation to prevnet crosscourt lobs, and the team NEVER plays two up - someone is always staggered behind the net person.

Whether you choose to play that way or not, the book still have some great ideas on court movement and shot selection.

I believe you are describing the second edition, not the first edition.

The second edition bites, for the reasons you state, among others. IMHO.

Buy the first edition, or save your money and buy some socks.

smoothtennis
10-10-2009, 07:35 AM
I believe you are describing the second edition, not the first edition.

The second edition bites, for the reasons you state, among others. IMHO.

Buy the first edition, or save your money and buy some socks.

Crap - I had no idea - I guess they don't have the first edition in the stores - that sucks. Yeah -the book is good to ME, only because I have enough experience to know some of the crap stuff from the good stuff. Too bad.

I do need some new socks though :mrgreen:

86golf
02-13-2010, 05:29 AM
Repeat: First edition only. Second edition is different and not good.

For a couple months I've been complaining to my wife how I disagree with some of the statements in "The Art of Doubles" e-2. Unfortunately I just now did a search and found Cindy's comment. Specifically, Diagram 1 on page 32 is wrong. Any 3.5 or better player will burn you down the alley 9-10 times. Other issues have been mentioned in this thread, but the overall theme is what I took issue with. The book assumes that lobs are a go to strategy for most teams, and I just don't see it at 4.0.

I have however been using the staggered formation, I just implement it a little differently. Do others use this?

That said, are there any other suggestions on good doubles strategy either books or web since this thread was started?

papa
02-13-2010, 06:10 AM
Yeah, Pats book is good and I agree about the first edition. There are many other books and on line publications that are also very good also. Kathy's stuff was good and although we had a issue or two, I think it was well prepared and presented in a sensible manner. Certainly miss her participation in the tennis world.

raiden031
02-13-2010, 06:24 AM
The only other thing I would say about this book is appears to have been written by a woman, and some of the her hard and fast statements seem to belong to 3.5 tennis, such as you never need topspin groundies ,or topspin lobs. Sorry ,from my past 4 matches, those hard topspin dippers have decided an awful lot of points for all teams.

Oh, and be warned - this book is a 'specific system' of doubles called California Doubles by some. It is based on a staggered formation to prevnet crosscourt lobs, and the team NEVER plays two up - someone is always staggered behind the net person.

Whether you choose to play that way or not, the book still have some great ideas on court movement and shot selection.

I agree with the first paragraph here, there is definitely some questionable material in this book, and I think she's a little out of touch with what goes on in men's tennis.

I agree with the staggered formation...it is two up, but its just saying that one players is closer to the net and the other player is a little bit deeper. I think this is a sound way to play two up.

---

Cindy, why is there such a difference between 1st and 2nd edition? Like could you summarize the main differences?

raiden031
02-13-2010, 06:29 AM
I thought the book "Competitive Tennis: Climbing the NTRP Ladder" has some great doubles strategy and is explained in a very simple way. The only problem with this book is that it is organized by NTRP level. So you have to read 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5 strategies and then integrate them all together. Plus some of the 3.0 and 3.5 advice you have to throw away when integrating with the 4.0 & 4.5 advice. But this is where I learned most of my doubles strategy.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2010, 10:40 AM
I agree with the first paragraph here, there is definitely some questionable material in this book, and I think she's a little out of touch with what goes on in men's tennis.

I agree with the staggered formation...it is two up, but its just saying that one players is closer to the net and the other player is a little bit deeper. I think this is a sound way to play two up.

---

Cindy, why is there such a difference between 1st and 2nd edition? Like could you summarize the main differences?

I did summarize the differences maybe a year ago. I'll have to search Adult League Forum to find that thread. It was *really* hard to summarize in writing without the diagrams.

Funny this thread should get bumped. I just pulled the second edition off the shelf and glanced through it this morning. Now that I am playing more 2-up and more mixed, I wanted to see if my opinion had changed.

If anything, I now hold the second edition in lower regard than I did initially. I notice that the author recommends that the deep player call the shots during a point, including calling switches to cover lobs. I feel strongly that it is not a good idea to have the non-lobbed player calling the switch, because the only the lobbed player knows for sure whether the lobbed player can hit that ball as an overhead. I think having the lobbed player make the decision is better.

Regarding why there is such a difference between first and second edition, only the author knows for sure. Which is another shortcoming of the book. If you are going to revise your book, you really ought to compare and contrast your old approach with your new one. Blaskower doesn't do this.

What I think probably happened is that her first edition was criticized because it leaves the players vulnerable to lobs and also many people prefer a staggered formation. So she decided to write about a staggered formation. I just don't think she got it exactly right.

My pro is teaching us a staggered formation, and he teaches it differently from what Blaskower recommends. First, she has the deeper, crosscourt player positioned very far crosscourt, guarding against the severely angled pass. The problem with that is that the crosscourt player is very far from the net and will be digging out dippers all match.

Also, I do not like how Blaskower seems to assume that the crosscourt player will not finish points. If either player gets a chance to hit an aggressive shot, they should take that ball. Blaskower's designation of one player as the "Terminator" implies that this player will finish points and the other play will not. Nope. If the crosscourt court player gets a kill shot, she should close and take it, IMHO.

The remainder of the second edition has good stuff, especially on poaching, but all of that stuff is contained in the first edition.

Cindysphinx
02-14-2010, 10:56 AM
OK, here's the link to one of the threads on the second edition Aof D:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=182417&highlight=blaskower

Cindysphinx
02-14-2010, 11:04 AM
Here's the other thread, which covers Blaskower's view of shots that are unnecessary in doubles:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=182326&highlight=blaskower

jswinf
02-14-2010, 02:33 PM
What is prevnet?

A net to be installed around a teenaged daughter.