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View Full Version : Trying to self rate myself


shazbot
10-09-2009, 06:37 AM
So I played a guy in my area, who self rated himself as a 4.0. I self rate myself at 4.0 as well (but really self ratings don't mean much).

Anyways I beat him 6-1 6-0 6-1. So how do I go about rating my self if I have never been officially rated. Most of the people I play against are self rated, so it's hard to judge.

GuyClinch
10-09-2009, 06:41 AM
^^^ Yeah umm you can't learn anything unless you play some rated players. Self-rated 4.0's can be 2.5s or 4.5s ...

Pete

JRstriker12
10-09-2009, 06:44 AM
So I played a guy in my area, who self rated himself as a 4.0. I self rate myself at 4.0 as well (but really self ratings don't mean much).

Anyways I beat him 6-1 6-0 6-1. So how do I go about rating my self if I have never been officially rated. Most of the people I play against are self rated, so it's hard to judge.

You might have to break out of your current cirlce of hittiting partners and find a few people who are computer rated - that's probabaly the easist and most acurrate way to get an estimate of your level.

Otherwise, self-rate and play in a league or a few tourneys.

BTW- how is everyone you know self rated? Do have any of them playing in a USTA league for more than one year???

Grampy
10-09-2009, 06:44 AM
Play a 4.0 tourney. That should let you know where you stand.

shazbot
10-09-2009, 06:57 AM
How do I go about getting into a league or tournament in my local area? Who do I contact lol?

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-09-2009, 07:36 AM
How do I go about getting into a league or tournament in my local area? Who do I contact lol?

-.- Sigh... In the words of a great player, "YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS!!!"

Go to usta.com then get a membership then click on tennislink, and choose tournaments or leagues... Simple as that.

JRstriker12
10-09-2009, 08:18 AM
How do I go about getting into a league or tournament in my local area? Who do I contact lol?

-.- Sigh... In the words of a great player, "YOU CANNOT BE SERIOUS!!!"

Go to usta.com then get a membership then click on tennislink, and choose tournaments or leagues... Simple as that.

Hmmmmmm........

You may want to self rate at 3.0 and work you way up.....

BTW- What's your tennis background?

UnforcedError
10-09-2009, 08:36 AM
Read the USTA guidelines for self rating then subtract 1.0 - 1.5 from what you think.

Kostas
10-09-2009, 08:42 AM
Read the USTA guidelines for self rating then subtract 1.0 - 1.5 from what you think.

LOL - I read the first half of that sentence and immediately thought..."Eh...that's kind of a bad idea for reasons we all know..."

Then I read the 2nd half and laughed my *** off because it's true...although it may be better to subtract 1.5 - 2.0.

shazbot
10-09-2009, 09:29 AM
LOL well I'm certainly not a 2.0 haha. But I get where you are going, people over rate them selves all the time.

Most of the people I have played are around my age (25-30) and played high-school tennis. I win majority of the sets we play (probably 80%) and I never had lessons or played in high-school.

I actually just messaged a guy on craigslist who said he played division III college tennis and is a 5.5. I know he will double bagel me if we play, but I thought it would be a good way to gauge where I am at.

Is the only way to get "computer" rated by joining a league/tournament? Or can a club do that?

Mick
10-09-2009, 09:31 AM
just tell people you are an unrated player. doing so, you're not under-rating or over-rating yourself and people will find out how good you are when they play you :)

JRstriker12
10-09-2009, 10:05 AM
LOL well I'm certainly not a 2.0 haha. But I get where you are going, people over rate them selves all the time.

Most of the people I have played are around my age (25-30) and played high-school tennis. I win majority of the sets we play (probably 80%) and I never had lessons or played in high-school.

I actually just messaged a guy on craigslist who said he played division III college tennis and is a 5.5. I know he will double bagel me if we play, but I thought it would be a good way to gauge where I am at.

Is the only way to get "computer" rated by joining a league/tournament? Or can a club do that?

One more question - how long have you been playing tennis?

Meh - playing high school tennis doesn't mean too much. The level of play in HS tennis varies pretty widely. Some schools, any person who has a racket can walk on and play - other schools may have a few juniors on thier teams and good coaching.

Honestly - if you want to know your level, play some computer rated USTA players.

Also - beware the caiglisters - lots of people lie or exagertate thier ratings. If he's a true 5.5 and/or a Div III player - check his results in tennis link and his school's website. BUT also be aware that there are some schools where you could be a 4.0 or 3.5 and play for a Div III college.

The only way to be computer rated IS to play in USTA leagues. A club pro can give you a rating estimate - but people in who are computer rated have basically shown their level of play through the results of thier matches.

shazbot
10-09-2009, 10:37 AM
One more question - how long have you been playing tennis?

Meh - playing high school tennis doesn't mean too much. The level of play in HS tennis varies pretty widely. Some schools, any person who has a racket can walk on and play - other schools may have a few juniors on thier teams and good coaching.

Honestly - if you want to know your level, play some computer rated USTA players.

Also - beware the caiglisters - lots of people lie or exagertate thier ratings. If he's a true 5.5 and/or a Div III player - check his results in tennis link and his school's website. BUT also be aware that there are some schools where you could be a 4.0 or 3.5 and play for a Div III college.

The only way to be computer rated IS to play in USTA leagues. A club pro can give you a rating estimate - but people in who are computer rated have basically shown their level of play through the results of thier matches.

I started playing tennis when I was about 16, I would play with my brother (who played college tennis) and played with him till I was about 19. We probably played once or twice a month.

Recently (within the last 2 years, I'm 25 now) I started playing a lot. I try to play twice a week now, but cannot really find anyone who can challenge me. I have found many people on craigslist who self rate them selves 4.0, and I usually beat them 1 and 0. I know I'm not that good, so obviously these people are not 4.0's and it's frustrating cause I feel it is not making me any better.

I am finding it hard to find people in my area to play with on public courts. I don't want to join a club because they are so expensive to play at. I e-mailed the women who runs the leagues in my area today, so hopefully she will have some info for me.

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-09-2009, 01:16 PM
Meh - playing high school tennis doesn't mean too much. The level of play in HS tennis varies pretty widely. Some schools, any person who has a racket can walk on and play - other schools may have a few juniors on thier teams and good coaching.

Hahaha! That's what happened to my school for one year. I was like, "SERIOUSLY NOW?! We're letting noobs who literally just found a racket at home into the team?! Look at THAT noob! He's getting a ****ing lesson during tryouts! Why the f*** did the rest of work our asses off?!" Kinda ****ed me off as you can tell. :)

Then the next year, all the good people got cut... HAHAHAHAHA. Or they quit, because we didn't quite agree with the new coach and he didn't quite agree with us... **** happens when you cycle through coaches and start having people who don't know jack about tennis being the head coach...

I find that the schools in the richer schools (in richer areas), private schools, and places like that are the ones with the really good teams. They can afford plenty of private lessons, and many of them will be pretty good. Our school was soso. We weren't rich like Beverly Hills, but we were well set. They had Daniel Ho, ranked top 5 in 16s and top 25 in 18s here in Southern California.

GuyClinch
10-09-2009, 01:41 PM
Craiglist ratings are kind of crazy. What happened is that quite a few people exaggerated their ratings so others to find suitable partners exaggerated themselves. And that's all fine - but you wouldn't want to claim yourself a 4.5 and meet a league tested 4.5 and embarrass yourself.

Pete

Tennisman912
10-09-2009, 02:00 PM
Shazbot,

You said “I started playing tennis when I was about 16, I would play with my brother (who played college tennis) and played with him till I was about 19. We probably played once or twice a month.

Recently (within the last 2 years, I'm 25 now) I started playing a lot. I try to play twice a week now, but cannot really find anyone who can challenge me. I have found many people on craigslist who self rate them selves 4.0, and I usually beat them 1 and 0. I know I'm not that good, so obviously these people are not 4.0's and it's frustrating cause I feel it is not making me any better.

I am finding it hard to find people in my area to play with on public courts. I don't want to join a club because they are so expensive to play at. I e-mailed the women who runs the leagues in my area today, so hopefully she will have some info for me.”

Playing once or twice a month like when you were younger is not going to cut it. Now you are lucky to play twice a week because you have a hard time finding players. I suggest you go to the nearest club and asked to be setup with some local players (or join) and they will hook you up with some numbers or make some calls. But I recommend you ask for 3.0-3.5 and not above 3.5. The good news is there are plenty of players at this level. Ignore anyone who says they are self rated unless they have previous tournament or league experience. Playing a lot is 6 or 7 times a week and not hopefully two times a week.

I know not exactly what you want to hear but if you think playing once or twice a month and now a couple of times a week with no instruction gets you to rated 4.0, you are pretty optimistic I will say and will set yourself up for disappointment. A rated 4.0 player will beat 95%+ of self rated players of any level. At the end of the day, your level doesn’t really matter. Just get out and meet some people and enjoy playing.

Good luck

TM

JRstriker12
10-09-2009, 05:18 PM
Hahaha! That's what happened to my school for one year. I was like, "SERIOUSLY NOW?! We're letting noobs who literally just found a racket at home into the team?! Look at THAT noob! He's getting a ****ing lesson during tryouts! Why the f*** did the rest of work our asses off?!" Kinda ****ed me off as you can tell. :)

Then the next year, all the good people got cut... HAHAHAHAHA. Or they quit, because we didn't quite agree with the new coach and he didn't quite agree with us... **** happens when you cycle through coaches and start having people who don't know jack about tennis being the head coach...

I find that the schools in the richer schools (in richer areas), private schools, and places like that are the ones with the really good teams. They can afford plenty of private lessons, and many of them will be pretty good. Our school was soso. We weren't rich like Beverly Hills, but we were well set. They had Daniel Ho, ranked top 5 in 16s and top 25 in 18s here in Southern California.

True!!!

I'm well past my high school days, but I went to a public school in North East PA and tennis wasn't even a blip on the radar - football was god and b-ball was okay.

Our coach was a volunteer and tennis nut. He had a son playing tennis at a local DIII college and was trying to coach his daughter - who was also on the team - it was a coed team. He was a nice guy, but he mainly was worried about coaching his daughter and didn't really coach anyone else.

We practiced at a public court that looked like someone buried tennis balls on it before it was paved. Our best player was also the point guard on on JV b-ball squad. He didn't have much strokes but he could get to any ball.

We go our azzes handed to by all the private schools in the area who had good coaches, parents could afford private lessons, nice courts and ball machines!

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-09-2009, 05:39 PM
True!!!

I'm well past my high school days, but I went to a public school in North East PA and tennis wasn't even a blip on the radar - football was god and b-ball was okay.

Our coach was a volunteer and tennis nut. He had a son playing tennis at a local DIII college and was trying to coach his daughter - who was also on the team - it was a coed team. He was a nice guy, but he mainly was worried about coaching his daughter and didn't really coach anyone else.

We practiced at a public court that looked like someone buried tennis balls on it before it was paved. Our best player was also the point guard on on JV b-ball squad. He didn't have much strokes but he could get to any ball.

We go our azzes handed to by all the private schools in the area who had good coaches, parents could afford private lessons, nice courts and ball machines!

lol We had the same experience here! The coach had 2 daughters on the team, so he only focused on the girl's team and their results. And in practice me mainly only focused on his daughters and the girls who were good enough to hit with them. Though he was clearly biased towards them when he set up the lineups. Then he left the school and we've been struggling to have a coach that isn't a total ******bag on a power trip.

Blake0
10-09-2009, 07:20 PM
Play matches against computer rated people, join tourneys, go to a league and get rated, or post a video here to get a good start to assume your level..we'll get close.... most of the times :).

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-09-2009, 07:50 PM
Play matches against computer rated people, join tourneys, go to a league and get rated, or post a video here to get a good start to assume your level..we'll get close.... most of the times :).

That's only if he can get past the idiots, sarcastic posts, and the joke posts. :)

Ken Honecker
10-10-2009, 12:16 AM
In all honesty it doesn't sound like you have played much tennis. Back in High School and College when I was playing a lot I was probably averaging 30+ sets a week when it was tennis weather. At that time I felt that if I took a week off my game lost focus and it took some noticable effort to get it back. That said I'm now old and fat and just coming back from about 20 years off and thinking about trying this new fangled league thing and playing the rating game but even though I have visions of having been maybe a 4.0-4.5 30 years ago I'm planning on starting at 3.0 and seeing how things go and would reccomend you do the same.

shazbot
10-10-2009, 06:22 AM
I will try to get a video. That will be tough lol, but I will try.

I figured because I could get my forehand and backhand both in with pace, and very reliably that I would rate myself 4.0. We will see though haha.

When I'm playing someone, what's a good sign they are above a 4.0? Most of the guys I play with can hit good top spin forehands, but their backhands are pretty weak and they have very slow second serves.

Thanks for the help though everyone, I will work on getting a video.

gameboy
10-11-2009, 01:05 AM
I figured because I could get my forehand and backhand both in with pace, and very reliably that I would rate myself 4.0. We will see though haha.

When I'm playing someone, what's a good sign they are above a 4.0? Most of the guys I play with can hit good top spin forehands, but their backhands are pretty weak and they have very slow second serves.


I don't know where you come from, but around here, 4.0's do not have a weak backhand. It may not be as good as the forehand, but 4.0's can keep a very long rally going with just a backhand. And definitely a good solid spin second serve, not the kind where people dink it in.

Based on your description, you are not even looking at 3.5. If they don't have a good second serve and can't hit a backhand, you are looking at 3.0.

And when you say a good top spin, is it the kind where the ball dips towards the end and bounces to your shoulder or higher? If not, it is really not that good of a topspin shot.

My guess is most of the people you have been playing are 3.0's and you are probably 3.0 or 3.5.

But then again, it is impossible to know just by typed descriptions. It is even difficult with a video as 3.5's and 4.0's have very similar looking strokes, except that 4.0's are much more consistent.

The only way to know for sure is to enter a tourney or get rated by a local pro.