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View Full Version : continental grip more powerful than eastern? true?


wyutani
10-10-2009, 12:53 AM
Is the continental grip for the forehand more powerful than the eastern? i find this hard to believe. so is it true mate'? :confused:

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-10-2009, 01:46 AM
Is the continental grip for the forehand more powerful than the eastern? i find this hard to believe. so is it true mate'? :confused:

Maybe for a backhand slice...

Djokovicfan4life
10-10-2009, 02:41 AM
I've never heard this for the forehand. It's true for the serve, of course, but no way for the forehand.

wyutani
10-10-2009, 04:08 AM
I've never heard this for the forehand. It's true for the serve, of course, but no way for the forehand.

its actually a grip jimmy connors is known to use.

SystemicAnomaly
10-10-2009, 04:53 AM
its actually a grip jimmy connors is known to use.

Johnny Mac also used it quite a bit, as did many of their era. Not as much power in the game back then tho'. The contact point for a Continental FH is usually a bit later than other strokes. This would tend to involve less body rotation to produce an efficient racquet head speed. This would generally mean that power is more difficult to produce on the FH with this grip.

I had always heard that the Eastern FH grip was inherently more powerful than other grips. However, since it does not easily produce as much topspin as the Western grips, it might not be easy to take advantage of that power without hitting the ball out.

ubermeyer
10-10-2009, 10:33 AM
totally false, lol what are you talking about???

WildVolley
10-10-2009, 11:36 AM
Why would it be more powerful on a forehand? It is the preferred grip on the serve, but that mechanics are very different from the forehand.

Most people find it hard to hit in front and to hit topspin on a high bouncing ball using the continental. That's why very few pros use it from the baseline these days.

Blake0
10-10-2009, 12:44 PM
I doubt that, i've always heard that eastern is capable of being more powerful.

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-10-2009, 12:48 PM
I've never heard this for the forehand. It's true for the serve, of course, but no way for the forehand.

This is probably what was meant when he heard about it.

And the eastern grip is by far the most powerful grip on the forehand (though that doesn't mean it'll be consistent).

5263
10-10-2009, 01:00 PM
Is the continental grip for the forehand more powerful than the eastern? i find this hard to believe. so is it true mate'? :confused:

Sure!

for serve, volleys and slice.
also works well on my forward tweener and overhead backfire shot, lol

LeeD
10-10-2009, 01:55 PM
Yes, for the amount of effort you put in, you can hit a ball that moves faster than eastern, SW, or full W.
But no, if you put in the effort to hit the other grips, you will hit with more power.
Yes, I said that, and you would need to think a bit before poo pooing....

35ft6
10-10-2009, 03:04 PM
No it's not.

wyutani
10-10-2009, 04:52 PM
you know i tried it, and thats why when playing squash with a conti grip., u'll hear a booming sound. a loud one, compared to using a semi western for squash.

NLBwell
10-10-2009, 05:18 PM
There isn't really any DIRECT correlation between grip and power of the groundstroke. A flat stroke will put the most speed on the ball. You can hit flat with any grip. It may not be comfortable or as easy to hit a ball with a certain swingpath and impact location, but it can be done with any grip. It is easier to hit high balls with a western grip and low balls with a continental grip, but of course people with these grips can certainly hit either of these balls. A good player with any grip will be able to hit any ball in any way he chooses. You can hit huge topspin with a continental and can hit absoluely flat with a western grip, but it is less natural.

Solat
10-10-2009, 05:36 PM
EFH would be the most powerful in general as it positions the hand/arm behind the racquet not on top which will encourage plow through.

the reason squash players use that grip is so they can use it for all shots, secondly the weight of the squash racquet means you can use your wrist more easily to generate racquet speed (also since you have less room you need to),

LeeD
10-11-2009, 08:29 AM
and of course, DEPENDS...
What do you mean by more powerful? Faster ball? more spin? Does more effort count? Is topspin the only thing you can think of?
More powerful...forehand. OK, EVERY pro, when they want to hit the ball as far as they can into the stands uses a continental grip! So is that more powerful? Nope, it only means hitting with backspin makes the ball go farther!
More powerful...forehand. If you are totally lacking in muscles to swing, a conti grip will allow you to hit the fastest moving forehand...it goes flat mostly, it scoops up low balls, and you can learn to slice it a bit to hit high balls far deep into the baseline.
And you use conti on serves, which I assume you'd want "power"....
:shock::shock::):)
The above is a one sided 30% answer to the question.

doom
10-12-2009, 03:12 AM
No grip is inherently more powerful than another.

A continental is more adept at producing flatter balls from the same amount of effort from a player, and of course a flatter ball travels through the air quicker than a ball hit with the same force but with spin added.