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webbeing
10-12-2009, 08:24 PM
Hello,

Anyone happen to know of a way to practice timing of taking the racquet back and swing forward at home? I am looking for someway to simulate the sequence of watching the ball coming down, racquet back, swing forward at the ball bouncing up. "Practice Hit" and the likes does not work for this. Many thanks.

user92626
10-12-2009, 08:26 PM
Get a Wii?

LeeD
10-13-2009, 12:12 PM
Watch tennis on TV with a racket in hand and some room around you.
You swing when they do, right after the other guy hits the ball. Makes you early and economical in takeback/swing.

webbeing
10-13-2009, 01:48 PM
Lee,

By "other guy" do you mean the guy on the opposite court, farthest from the TV viewer? Thanks.

WildVolley
10-13-2009, 04:00 PM
Watch tennis on TV with a racket in hand and some room around you.
You swing when they do, right after the other guy hits the ball. Makes you early and economical in takeback/swing.

This is actually an interesting suggestion Lee. Assuming, of course, that you don't end up smashing your TV or your monitor. It will give a sense of how quickly the pros prepare and then swing.

LeeD
10-14-2009, 09:59 AM
"some room around you".... :)
Yeah, when tennis is on TV, you see both players at once, so concentrate on the guy at the opposite end, and have your friends concentrate on when YOU start to move, start your recognition/takeback, and swing.
Oh, try to watch regular motion, not fast or slow, of course.

BMC9670
10-14-2009, 10:50 AM
Good question. I've been thinking about getting one of these devices for practicing stroke technique and timing at home: http://www.practicehit.com/.

Looks like it would work in minimal space and at least you swing at a moving ball. Anyone have an experience with it?

LeeD
10-14-2009, 02:46 PM
Sure, anytime you practice the actual swing, it's a good thing.
But I thought the OP was talking TIMING here. Timing means watching the ball leave the opponent's racket, reacting quickly with split step (if you're young enough), turn shoulders, racket back and ready for forward swing, then forward swing compact and quick enough for recovery to position again.

BMC9670
10-15-2009, 10:02 AM
IMO, I think simulating timing as it is on an actual court at home would be really difficult to impossible. At least with a device like a practicehit, you can hit a moving ball, which does have timing elements involved. You still have to prepare and swing the racket with good timing.

Has anyone tried one of these things?

OverTheHill
10-15-2009, 10:12 AM
In this year's US open, Melanie Oudin lost many first sets before finally winning all but one of those matches. She said it took her the first set to get used to the different timing of each opponent. Thus, the timing is different for each person and situation. I don't think you can improve timing without playing people or maybe using ball machines.

Also, that little tee-ball contraption mentioned earlier looks ridiculous. All it might do is give you tennis elbow IMO.

LafayetteHitter
10-15-2009, 10:14 AM
Hello,

Anyone happen to know of a way to practice timing of taking the racquet back and swing forward at home? I am looking for someway to simulate the sequence of watching the ball coming down, racquet back, swing forward at the ball bouncing up. "Practice Hit" and the likes does not work for this. Many thanks.

Toss the ball into a ceiling fan, it will come back quick...

Hard to say really, possibly try to find a wall near you to hit on.

ronalditop
10-15-2009, 10:22 AM
Remember to not air swing to fast or your arm may get sore. I used to air swing in my house for about half hour almost daily, and I used to do it very fast. Then after a few days my arm was very sored and I couldnt play for days. I realized that the when you hit a stroke and make contact with the ball it reduces the swing speed, but when you just air swing there is nothing to stop your the speed of the swing so it can be a little harsh for the arm.

LeeD
10-15-2009, 10:28 AM
To me, this exercise....TV tennis.... is more about racketprep, shoulder turn, and backswing more than the actual forward swing.
True, if you swing too fast, you'll blow out your arm. OTOH, most of my groundies are swung NOT full speed, as I don't need to blow out my arm hitting groundstrokes on or off the court.

smoothtennis
10-15-2009, 10:44 AM
I tried a couple of the ones where the ball in on the string called a tennis trainer - and that things didn't hold up 30 minutes hitting what I call a normal topspin forehand - just too much force against it. The ball would break off the rubber stringy thing.

webbeing
10-15-2009, 01:52 PM
Yes, my original question is about timing, particularly the sequence of taking the racquet back FURTHER AFTER (not mean to shout, just want to emphasize) the shoulder turn AND forward swing. Somewhere in this sequence I am late in hitting the ball. I am already in position, my shoulder aldready turned and racquet's partially back (as a result of shoulder turn), then took the racquet back further, then forward swing, and of course late contact. So I've tried to speed up the racquet back sequence by taking the racquet all the way back in one step, and wait for the ball, then forward swing. Again I would be late contacting the ball, or early and contacted the ball too far out in front.

So yes, more court time and ball machine would fix this, though both are hard to come by in the winter. Guess, I'd have to invent something. Thanks for all the responds.

javierjavier
10-15-2009, 02:49 PM
i don't know how well your ground strokes are grooved, but it sounds like from your reply you're still developing your swing.

it sounds like you're changing your stroke to take your back swing further back? i mean that changes the timing and rhythm of your stroke, so it's no wonder your timing to contact point is off.

i bet once you build a nice rhythm with your new fh or bh the timing will be there pretty quickly. i'd spend the off season grooving my new swing and not worry about timing.

take your lesson from baseball players when it comes to batting. step 1 is building a smooth and consistent swing and finding that ideal contact point... only then would you face the challenge of timing and adapting to various pitches.