PDA

View Full Version : Forehand Vids


silverszdtennis
10-14-2009, 06:39 AM
Hi,

I am trying to change my forehand grip from full western to semi-western.

Here are some vids of my practice last weekend.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6v2CqpNsXu0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ppdgBKZfO8

How can I add more racket speed ? more knee bend?

Thanks for your advice.

plumcrazy
10-14-2009, 06:57 AM
Hi,

I am trying to change my forehand grip from full western to semi-western.

Here are some vids of my practice last weekend.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6v2CqpNsXu0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ppdgBKZfO8

How can I add more racket speed ? more knee bend?

Thanks for your advice.

Looks like you have the same problem as I do. You are hitting off your back foot and moving backwards when you hit you forehand. I tend to do the samething. Try moving foreward into the ball.

5263
10-14-2009, 07:01 AM
I love the way you lift into your shots. You are doing much correct.
Would suggest you work on being more stable prior to the lifting (Balance)
and hit more across and up on the ball for swing speed. Pulling across into the ball gives more racket acceleration and depth control than coming straight up the back of the ball.

LeeD
10-14-2009, 08:32 AM
As said, but I gotta reiterate.
QUIT running away from the ball, moving backwards every shot!
And you jump way too often for every shot, losing balance, losing shot penetration and recovery time. Watch some pros. They jump for sure, but not EVERY shot, and they try to stay balanced, stable, land on their toes, not backwards towards your backdrop.
Swing seems OK, thos the straight takeback is a harking from 30 years ago. Seems you use a really LONG takeback, good for slow incoming balls, but maybe late for faster balls at higher levels of play.
I'd venture you're 4-4.5 right now, but you get tired on hot days, get tired in long matches, and hate multiple matches the same day. Too much jumping and effort for very little gain.

Djokovicfan4life
10-14-2009, 08:41 AM
Yeah, I didn't see one forehand where your weight was going forward into the court.

You have the same problem on your backhand. That ball was coming slowly enough to where you should have had time to get set up and step into the ball. Also, you have a loopy backswing on your one hander that will probably mess with your timing in the long run. I highly recommend that you learn the smile pattern where your hitting hand traces a simple smile rather than a big loop.

Watch how simple Federer's back swing is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxvRtP7C42o&feature=related

Matt

silverszdtennis
10-14-2009, 12:19 PM
Hi, all, thanks for the great tips, appreciated!

5263
10-14-2009, 01:17 PM
Looks like you have the same problem as I do. You are hitting off your back foot and moving backwards when you hit you forehand. I tend to do the samething. Try moving foreward into the ball.

Actually moving back as you lift can be a method of gaining racket accel, but you need to be on good balance. Probably not something you want to do so often, but like Nadal's reverse Fh, maybe that will be your style?

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-14-2009, 06:25 PM
Jesus Christ! You're all over the place! Jammed, lunging, jumping, twisting.

To maximize racket head speed you need 2 things, efficiency and practice. How do we improve efficiency? Well for one thing, we loosen up the arm which you seem to do. For another, we try to keep all our parts together and use them in unison to focus all our energy into the point of contact and nowhere else.

In your shorter video (12 seconds), all your forehands aside from the first one were better than EVERY forehand in your 21 second video. They were more balanced, your body parts weren't flying all over the place as much, and you didn't jump backwards as much.

For one, start your practice off with your swing at 50% racket head speed . From there, focus on your form. Accelerate into the ball and put plenty of spin on it and get clean contact. Keep your upper and lower body quiet, but allow them to rotate into the ball. Keep your feet on the floor and keep your knees bent. Move your feet to take the ball at the optimal contact height and distance.

Then work your swing speed to 70%. Focus on the exact same things. Get plenty of spin and net clearance, focus on clean contact, and keep your body quiet and in check.

Then bump up the speed to 80%. Focus on the exact same things. Get the footwork down, get plenty of spin and net clearance, contact the ball cleanly, keep the body quiet but allow it to rotate into your shot, and keep your knees bent and stay down through the shot. Now THIS should be your rally ball.

Then spend a few minutes (or a couple of shots now and then) bumping up your racket head speed to 100%, but focus on the exact same things! This should be your kill shot. Granted you can get A LITTLE more into it with your lower body, but don't overdo it like you did in that video.

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-14-2009, 06:28 PM
Actually moving back as you lift can be a method of gaining racket accel, but you need to be on good balance. Probably not something you want to do so often, but like Nadal's reverse Fh, maybe that will be your style?

It doesn't add racket head speed. Nadal leans back so he can get more heavily under the ball and generate a higher trajectory. That is what you're supposed to do on lobs. You lean back a little so your racket face opens up a little (doesn't necessarily become open but it can), and that results in a higher and loopier trajectory.

With his racket head speed and spin production, he can pull it off in such a way that it's an aggressive shot. Most people can't.

5263
10-14-2009, 06:33 PM
It doesn't add racket head speed.

Actually pulling back at the right moment can accelerate the racket.

Djokovicfan4life
10-14-2009, 06:35 PM
Actually pulling back at the right moment can accelerate the racket.

Um, care to explain?

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-14-2009, 06:46 PM
Actually pulling back at the right moment can accelerate the racket.

Yes... It DOES. But... Its contribution towards forward velocity is GREATLY REDUCED!

Take physics and you'll understand... Forces are directed in vectors. For maximum efficiency, you want ALL those vectors to point in the same direction. If the force vector generated from your body is going back, while your arm generates a force with the vector pointed forward, then your net force is GREATLY REDUCED! Depending on how greatly you pull back, your net force can be 0! Granted, we are all taught to hit up and forward, so even though the net force you generate is 0 forward, you have some upward force generated as well. This will send the ball upwards (obviously). That combined with Newton's law of equal and opposite reactions, the ball going forward into the strings, the strings will react with a force in the opposite direction. So your total resulting net force will still have some forward force.

However, it's TINY!

Pulling back WILL add acceleration and velocity. HOWEVER, it's NOT the kind you want. It is DETRIMENTAL to your swing.

You NEVER want to jump or pull back if you don't have to. The only reason people will do it is to give them more time to take the swing (the ball came in too deep or too fast). But to compensate, they have to swing THAT MUCH HARDER to generate the same shot as if they didn't move.

5263
10-14-2009, 07:26 PM
Pulling back WILL add acceleration and velocity.
.

We can agree to disagree.

first you say it doesn't add speed, then above you admit it does?

It works well with certain swing styles and is used for a variety of reasons on the pro tour. It is also taught as an option by some of the most noted coaches in the world.
Your narrow perspective on this, sounds just like what many said about the rev forehand before it's use became so widespread.
And no need to be so rude as to tell me to take physics. The last guy who talked to others on this forum like that lost his access. My background is quite technical, backed by extensive education, along with several physics PHD tennis players that I work with on issues like this. If you can't make it work for you, that is your issue til you learn it. Til then, it is just your theories you have.

5263
10-14-2009, 07:42 PM
Actually moving back as you lift can be a method of gaining racket accel, but you need to be on good balance. Probably not something you want to do so often,

This is what I said earlier and you have confirmed it in your post. If you want to discuss it further, please try to be more polite.

plumcrazy
10-15-2009, 07:34 AM
Actually moving back as you lift can be a method of gaining racket accel, but you need to be on good balance. Probably not something you want to do so often, but like Nadal's reverse Fh, maybe that will be your style?

Thanks. Actually I use the the reverse forehand a lot, probably to much, but I still find myself moving backward and it becomes a weak shot. If I do the reverse forehand and get my body into the shot or atleast neutral, it turns out pretty good. Nadal is such a good athelete I think he has more room for error. His balance is perfect even when is body is moving backwards. I, on the other hand, have little room for error.

5263
10-15-2009, 07:49 AM
Thanks. Actually I use the the reverse forehand a lot, probably to much, but I still find myself moving backward and it becomes a weak shot. If I do the reverse forehand and get my body into the shot or atleast neutral, it turns out pretty good. Nadal is such a good athelete I think he has more room for error. His balance is perfect even when is body is moving backwards. I, on the other hand, have little room for error.

Yes, you make good points. Hitting as you back up is a special technique and will be weak if done in conjunction with more conventional technique as xfull said. And as you mention, it's probably not something you would look to do that often. It's also nice to know there IS a way to do it if it becomes needed.

Sublime
10-15-2009, 08:41 AM
When nadal hits a reverse forehand his momentum is forward and into the ball. Up to and through contact he's moving his weight off his back foot and into the court.

After he's extended through the shot, the momentum from that 12oz+ 350SW+ racket moving at the speed of sound is redirected back and over his head by his shoulder and core rotation. This puts the balance back on his back foot.

At full speed it appears that he hits off his back foot, leans back, and never transfers weight into the shot, but there's a ton of forward power that happens for the split seconds around impact, which is when it matters.

NOTE... there are times he's forced to hit totally off his back foot, like any pro, when his time is taken away.

5263
10-15-2009, 08:47 AM
When nadal hits a reverse forehand his momentum is forward and into the ball. Up to and through contact he's moving his weight off his back foot and into the court.

After he's extended through the shot, the momentum from that 12oz+ 350SW+ racket moving at the speed of sound is redirected back and over his head by his shoulder and core rotation. This puts the balance back on his back foot.

At full speed it appears that he hits off his back foot, leans back, and never transfers weight into the shot, but there's a ton of forward power that happens for the split seconds around impact, which is when it matters.

NOTE... there are times he's forced to hit totally off his back foot, like any pro, when his time is taken away.

Some confusion here I think based on this and another post, linking backing up with the rev fh. In my post, I did not intend that the rev Fh was hit backing up. I was only referring to it as a style of hitting that was thought of in a certain way, til some players used it more potently. So the idea is that someone may start to hit some shots stepping back, which are very effective, and it may become a trend (like the rev fh has); but not really expecting it to, just allowing that it "could" happen.

silverszdtennis
10-15-2009, 08:47 AM
Jesus Christ! You're all over the place! Jammed, lunging, jumping, twisting.

To maximize racket head speed you need 2 things, efficiency and practice. How do we improve efficiency? Well for one thing, we loosen up the arm which you seem to do. For another, we try to keep all our parts together and use them in unison to focus all our energy into the point of contact and nowhere else.

In your shorter video (12 seconds), all your forehands aside from the first one were better than EVERY forehand in your 21 second video. They were more balanced, your body parts weren't flying all over the place as much, and you didn't jump backwards as much.

For one, start your practice off with your swing at 50% racket head speed . From there, focus on your form. Accelerate into the ball and put plenty of spin on it and get clean contact. Keep your upper and lower body quiet, but allow them to rotate into the ball. Keep your feet on the floor and keep your knees bent. Move your feet to take the ball at the optimal contact height and distance.

Then work your swing speed to 70%. Focus on the exact same things. Get plenty of spin and net clearance, focus on clean contact, and keep your body quiet and in check.

Then bump up the speed to 80%. Focus on the exact same things. Get the footwork down, get plenty of spin and net clearance, contact the ball cleanly, keep the body quiet but allow it to rotate into your shot, and keep your knees bent and stay down through the shot. Now THIS should be your rally ball.

Then spend a few minutes (or a couple of shots now and then) bumping up your racket head speed to 100%, but focus on the exact same things! This should be your kill shot. Granted you can get A LITTLE more into it with your lower body, but don't overdo it like you did in that video.

Very well said, thank you very much!

teachestennis
10-19-2009, 05:35 PM
Xfullcourt, I respectfully disagree with two things. First, as a expert on the history of tennis instruction (I even wrote a book on every tennis methodology I can find taught for the last 100 years and you can see it at www.moderntenniscoaches.com in the MTM library), I would ban any coach from telling people to stay down through the shot. That is harmful. As a thirty year pro, I can tell you from experience. Now that I am an expert at Modern Tennis Methodology, or MTM, anyone who watches me teach recognizes that I can get anyone to instantly hit better even if they dont' understand why it works better than the usual mumbo jumbo that has resulted in us going from 69 top 100 players to a dozen and losing twenty million players in the USA. I teach to actually drop step off the ball to increase acceleration while hitting up and across the ball because I show them how to focus on moving right to left and hitting like the pros. I am known as a man who can get anyone to hit a ball well because I don't introduce false data such as stay down through the shot. I know of what I speak.

Silver has a problem of timing, of not stalking the ball, meaning getting into position as if he were going to catch it, and then after waiting long enough to observe it after the bounce, plants the outside foot, usually the back foot, and then blasts across it. And therein is the key. Up and across is what works for students, not moving into the ball unless i move to find the ball in optimum contact zone. You are correct about his efficiency, but I assure you if he stays down low through the shot and thinks of moving forward on most shots rather than deflecting the ball using racket head speed using the principles of martial arts which means wait until the ball is close before you react so you can observe it in present time, then he will not get better and in fact most likey get stuck. Introducing false data is what hurts instruction and why so many people on here look confused. I assure you with MTM I get students to look better than that in a couple lessons, if not within half an hour, not all over the place, looking efficiently.

Pros don't move forward unless it's incidental to where they find the ball, and neither should amateurs. I couldn't say it better than this below. Your statement about hitting up while they open the racket is bogus because they don't even open the racket, which you admit later. They actually close the racket as they pull up and across the ball. MTM teaches the FH is a right to left movement, not worrying about the racket going through the target line, which it does passively because the physics is more martial arts using torque with the racket head lagging behind the hand than using the momentum formula emphasized by the USPTA and USTA which literally has been the downfall of USA tennis. All he needs to do is wait and move from right to left across the ball and his finish will shape his swing and keep his core connected to his body. Read below and see if this makes sense.

What I’ve come to know is that all those steps that I took because I was so concerned about being in the right position took time away from me, there just wasn’t enough time for me to get into the right position because the ball was coming back and forth too quickly, and now efficiency of movement is much more important than the quickness of the movements.
This brings me to loading, which I would say is at least misinterpreted or misunderstood often. I can’t stand hearing the statement “hit off the front foot.” I think the back foot lays the ground work for every groundstroke. If that back foot is not in position and not fully loaded, we are incapable of hitting quality consistent ground strokes. Indeed, sometimes we fire from out back foot to our front foot, and that's understandable, but more times than not, at least at the professional level, the loading and the firing continues the player in another direction other than forward . Compare it to a shortstop. Derek Jeter has to go to his right to field a ground ball. The first thing he does, if it’s within range, he gets his right side loaded behind the ground ball, backhands the ball and fires from that right side towards first base. Imagine Jeter being taken further into the hole, and he doesn’t’ have time to plant and fire towards first base, what does he do? He jumps to create energy so he can throw the ball back in the direction that he is moving away from, not moving towards, and I think this is very similar to the way to especially hit a forehand, but a backhand as well. In tennis, as players, what we have to do as players is fight to get behind the ball and then fire, fire whatever direction we can, but fire. This loading is essential and for us, I think we’re just fortunate we have tennis rackets to do it with rather than throw from the shortstop hole.

Xfulcourt, Telling students to stay down through the shots is blatantly old school and should never be taught by any pro. I know I taught it for 25 years and no wonder I couldn't make a good living as a tennis pro. Players load off the back foot on the FH and may get down low to find the ball as I often teach but then I teach them to uppercut to the finish, with the butt of the racket assoicated at the finish with the target line of the ball.

It is commonly heard that you need to stay down though your shot. The fact is that sometimes you stay down and sometimes you don’t. It is completely unnatural to stay down through impact most the time. If you stay down all the way through the shot you are not allowing the forces of rotation from a forehand or backhand to naturally take affect. It is not the staying down that keeps the ball in the court, but the rotation of the body. The rotation helps create the spin that is needed to keep the ball in the court. It is not that you don’t get down or load for your shots; it’s just that you don’t stay down through the entire shot. With the massive rotation of the body on your groundstrokes your body will have to come out of the down position.

As for moving forward into the ball, I dare you to dispute this.
Regarding the teaching to MOVE FORWARD INTO EVERY SHOT AND DON’T MOVE BACK:

It is amazing to me that this teaching method is still being taught. It is impossible and unnatural to go forward all of the time. Using foreword momentum as a rule will cause all kinds of problems with your swing. You cannot get away with playing all offense like you could years ago. Changing from defense to offense requires great flexibility and few limitations. This method is responsible for players at all levels never reaching their full potential.

Regarding hitting through the target line which I claim is harmful to teaching versus hitting across the ball, read this.

This method was popular years ago and remains a common teaching method. The idea is that after contact you can keep the ball on the strings longer by extending your follow-through towards the target. On film it is easy to see how the better players extend their racquet after impact. The arm does NOT control this. The arm is a passenger along for the ride. As the body unwinds or uncoils, the arm will naturally extend depending on the situation. This is a huge misconception. To physically move your arm forward trying to extend is an arm movement and independent of the body and will eventually cause all kinds of injuries.

I believe 5263 is correct, and for those of you who don't know, he's coached two of his own children from their first strokes to tennis scholarships as their primary teacher, something very few coaches have done. Even Nicky B admits he's never taken anyone from the beginning to the pros or even to tennis scholarships. Nick just takes credit for every top player that comes out of there even if they were #1 ranked before they got there (can anyone say Boris Becker?). 5263's son might have the hardest serve in college tennis and I think enough of his coaching to have a current 14 year old with a 120 mile an hour accurate serve coached in MTM for the last four years by another parent using Oscar's MTM techniques recommended to 5263 to work with given all the "top certified" pros in his area can't seem to understand how a guy hitting up and across and backs off the ball overpowers everyone and has to play 16 and18 year olds at the age of 14. I sure don't want a coach who is going to teach him to stay down through the ball or step forward when he's taught the opposite and is a great player. I've worked with the top two Tennesee 12 year old girls and both play per MTM and are barely 11 and Deana Grandes not only hits with a one handed backhand (on Oscar's latest DVD she hits with a college tennis player all out never stepping into the ball on both sides at barely 11) and she actually pulls back from every one handed backhand and she's been one or two ranked in the state for the last year and she's got over a year and half to go in the 12's. 5263 also does not brag but he has an advanced engineering degree and did not totally buy into MTM until he tested the data himself on court, though he figured out most of it by trial and error on his own.

Silver, email me at eztennisswing@yahoo.com and I'll fix your forehand very quickly as long as you tell these folks did what I tell you worked or not.

tennis angel
10-19-2009, 06:22 PM
Hi,

I am trying to change my forehand grip from full western to semi-western.

Here are some vids of my practice last weekend.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6v2CqpNsXu0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ppdgBKZfO8

How can I add more racket speed ? more knee bend?

Thanks for your advice.

Why are you trying to change your grip? How are you accomplishing that?

Roy125
10-19-2009, 07:12 PM
This reminds me of me hitting the ball O.o.

tennis angel
10-19-2009, 07:45 PM
Xfullcourt, I respectfully disagree with two things. First, as a expert on the history of tennis instruction (I even wrote a book on every tennis methodology I can find taught for the last 100 years and you can see it at www.moderntenniscoaches.com in the MTM library), I would ban any coach from telling people to stay down through the shot. That is harmful. As a thirty year pro, I can tell you from experience. Now that I am an expert at Modern Tennis Methodology, or MTM, anyone who watches me teach recognizes that I can get anyone to instantly hit better even if they dont' understand why it works better than the usual mumbo jumbo that has resulted in us going from 69 top 100 players to a dozen and losing twenty million players in the USA. I teach to actually drop step off the ball to increase acceleration while hitting up and across the ball because I show them how to focus on moving right to left and hitting like the pros. I am known as a man who can get anyone to hit a ball well because I don't introduce false data such as stay down through the shot. I know of what I speak.

Silver has a problem of timing, of not stalking the ball, meaning getting into position as if he were going to catch it, and then after waiting long enough to observe it after the bounce, plants the outside foot, usually the back foot, and then blasts across it. And therein is the key. Up and across is what works for students, not moving into the ball unless i move to find the ball in optimum contact zone. You are correct about his efficiency, but I assure you if he stays down low through the shot and thinks of moving forward on most shots rather than deflecting the ball using racket head speed using the principles of martial arts which means wait until the ball is close before you react so you can observe it in present time, then he will not get better and in fact most likey get stuck. Introducing false data is what hurts instruction and why so many people on here look confused. I assure you with MTM I get students to look better than that in a couple lessons, if not within half an hour, not all over the place, looking efficiently.

Pros don't move forward unless it's incidental to where they find the ball, and neither should amateurs. I couldn't say it better than this below. Your statement about hitting up while they open the racket is bogus because they don't even open the racket, which you admit later. They actually close the racket as they pull up and across the ball. MTM teaches the FH is a right to left movement, not worrying about the racket going through the target line, which it does passively because the physics is more martial arts using torque with the racket head lagging behind the hand than using the momentum formula emphasized by the USPTA and USTA which literally has been the downfall of USA tennis. All he needs to do is wait and move from right to left across the ball and his finish will shape his swing and keep his core connected to his body. Read below and see if this makes sense.

What Iíve come to know is that all those steps that I took because I was so concerned about being in the right position took time away from me, there just wasnít enough time for me to get into the right position because the ball was coming back and forth too quickly, and now efficiency of movement is much more important than the quickness of the movements.
This brings me to loading, which I would say is at least misinterpreted or misunderstood often. I canít stand hearing the statement ďhit off the front foot.Ē I think the back foot lays the ground work for every groundstroke. If that back foot is not in position and not fully loaded, we are incapable of hitting quality consistent ground strokes. Indeed, sometimes we fire from out back foot to our front foot, and that's understandable, but more times than not, at least at the professional level, the loading and the firing continues the player in another direction other than forward . Compare it to a shortstop. Derek Jeter has to go to his right to field a ground ball. The first thing he does, if itís within range, he gets his right side loaded behind the ground ball, backhands the ball and fires from that right side towards first base. Imagine Jeter being taken further into the hole, and he doesnítí have time to plant and fire towards first base, what does he do? He jumps to create energy so he can throw the ball back in the direction that he is moving away from, not moving towards, and I think this is very similar to the way to especially hit a forehand, but a backhand as well. In tennis, as players, what we have to do as players is fight to get behind the ball and then fire, fire whatever direction we can, but fire. This loading is essential and for us, I think weíre just fortunate we have tennis rackets to do it with rather than throw from the shortstop hole.

Xfulcourt, Telling students to stay down through the shots is blatantly old school and should never be taught by any pro. I know I taught it for 25 years and no wonder I couldn't make a good living as a tennis pro. Players load off the back foot on the FH and may get down low to find the ball as I often teach but then I teach them to uppercut to the finish, with the butt of the racket assoicated at the finish with the target line of the ball.

It is commonly heard that you need to stay down though your shot. The fact is that sometimes you stay down and sometimes you donít. It is completely unnatural to stay down through impact most the time. If you stay down all the way through the shot you are not allowing the forces of rotation from a forehand or backhand to naturally take affect. It is not the staying down that keeps the ball in the court, but the rotation of the body. The rotation helps create the spin that is needed to keep the ball in the court. It is not that you donít get down or load for your shots; itís just that you donít stay down through the entire shot. With the massive rotation of the body on your groundstrokes your body will have to come out of the down position.

As for moving forward into the ball, I dare you to dispute this.
Regarding the teaching to MOVE FORWARD INTO EVERY SHOT AND DONíT MOVE BACK:

It is amazing to me that this teaching method is still being taught. It is impossible and unnatural to go forward all of the time. Using foreword momentum as a rule will cause all kinds of problems with your swing. You cannot get away with playing all offense like you could years ago. Changing from defense to offense requires great flexibility and few limitations. This method is responsible for players at all levels never reaching their full potential.

Regarding hitting through the target line which I claim is harmful to teaching versus hitting across the ball, read this.

This method was popular years ago and remains a common teaching method. The idea is that after contact you can keep the ball on the strings longer by extending your follow-through towards the target. On film it is easy to see how the better players extend their racquet after impact. The arm does NOT control this. The arm is a passenger along for the ride. As the body unwinds or uncoils, the arm will naturally extend depending on the situation. This is a huge misconception. To physically move your arm forward trying to extend is an arm movement and independent of the body and will eventually cause all kinds of injuries.

I believe 5263 is correct, and for those of you who don't know, he's coached two of his own children from their first strokes to tennis scholarships as their primary teacher, something very few coaches have done. Even Nicky B admits he's never taken anyone from the beginning to the pros or even to tennis scholarships. Nick just takes credit for every top player that comes out of there even if they were #1 ranked before they got there (can anyone say Boris Becker?). 5263's son might have the hardest serve in college tennis and I think enough of his coaching to have a current 14 year old with a 120 mile an hour accurate serve coached in MTM for the last four years by another parent using Oscar's MTM techniques recommended to 5263 to work with given all the "top certified" pros in his area can't seem to understand how a guy hitting up and across and backs off the ball overpowers everyone and has to play 16 and18 year olds at the age of 14. I sure don't want a coach who is going to teach him to stay down through the ball or step forward when he's taught the opposite and is a great player. I've worked with the top two Tennesee 12 year old girls and both play per MTM and are barely 11 and Deana Grandes not only hits with a one handed backhand (on Oscar's latest DVD she hits with a college tennis player all out never stepping into the ball on both sides at barely 11) and she actually pulls back from every one handed backhand and she's been one or two ranked in the state for the last year and she's got over a year and half to go in the 12's. 5263 also does not brag but he has an advanced engineering degree and did not totally buy into MTM until he tested the data himself on court, though he figured out most of it by trial and error on his own.

Silver, email me at eztennisswing@yahoo.com and I'll fix your forehand very quickly as long as you tell these folks did what I tell you worked or not.

I hope Silver reveals what he learns!