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View Full Version : I keep hitting the frame!


DudewithBabolat
10-14-2009, 02:46 PM
What can i do to avoid this, my racquet right now is the original aeropro 10.6oz (not sure if that's strung or unstrung) should i get a heavier racquet? is it my hitting technique? i hit eastern/semi-western, i'm trying to transition to semi-western, but sometimes i hit in a eastern-ish hit.

where it usually hits is the side of the racket, when i swing up the ball will catch where the frame and the strings meet, it's super fustrating.

Thanks in advance

LeeD
10-14-2009, 02:49 PM
Most important to watch ball, turn shoulders fully, stroke thru...
But you gotta hit a few too, so lotsa practice using the above suggestions.
Ain't the racket, but the user.

NickH87
10-14-2009, 02:56 PM
Choose a grip, theres a possibility that your muscle memory gets used to hitting eastern and then you hit semi western or vice versa and the swing pattern may be a little off.

VGP
10-14-2009, 03:02 PM
get better hand-eye coordination.

SuperFly
10-14-2009, 03:13 PM
The gods of tennis offer thee a comandment:

THOU SHALL KEEP THY HEAD STILL THROUGHOUT CONTACT AND BEYOND

Noaler
10-14-2009, 03:19 PM
whenever i shank the ball it goes in weird like 90% of the time

XLes paulO
10-14-2009, 03:30 PM
Mabye make sure your feet are moving and that your in position. Are you always shanking balls or just when your tierd or twards the end of a set?

ronalditop
10-14-2009, 03:39 PM
First make sure the problem is you and not the racquet. Try playing with a different racquet and see if you still have that problem. If you do, then practice on your technique, and if you find that you dont shank nearly as much with the other racquet, then it means that your racquet is the problem.
I've had the same problem, shanked a lot though my technique was fine. I realize the problem was that the racquet face closed way too much on impact, so I hit the side of the frame often. To fix it I put some lead at 3 and 9 and problem solved.

Noveson
10-14-2009, 03:41 PM
First make sure the problem is you and not the racquet. Try playing with a different racquet and see if you still have that problem. If you do, then practice on your technique, and if you find that you dont shank nearly as much with the other racquet, then it means that your racquet is the problem.
I've had the same problem, shanked a lot though my technique was fine. I realize the problem was that the racquet face closed way too much on impact, so I hit the side of the frame often. To fix it I put some lead at 3 and 9 and problem solved.

Hah what? Are you joking or no? If you are shanking, watch the goddamn ball, and make sure your racquet face isn't at some odd angle. Frames, lead tape, etc are not the solution.

longst
10-14-2009, 03:48 PM
First make sure the problem is you and not the racquet. Try playing with a different racquet and see if you still have that problem. If you do, then practice on your technique, and if you find that you dont shank nearly as much with the other racquet, then it means that your racquet is the problem.
I've had the same problem, shanked a lot though my technique was fine. I realize the problem was that the racquet face closed way too much on impact, so I hit the side of the frame often. To fix it I put some lead at 3 and 9 and problem solved.


:shock::shock:????

tikkimonkey
10-14-2009, 03:50 PM
It's not the racket, elitist, gear obsessed forum users. :p Use more trunk rotation and keep your swing consistent throughout your stroke, whether that means consistently fast or even consistently slow.

scotus
10-14-2009, 03:50 PM
Keep eyes on the ball, watch the ball to the racquet, keep the head steady, do not jerk the chest/shoulders, keep eyes on the contact point until after the followthrough.

All above the above pretty much communicate the same idea (some work better than others). They will help you.

tikkimonkey
10-14-2009, 04:30 PM
If frames makes no difference to you then why dont you just play with a 40 bucks walmart racquet instead of a 200 bucks k.six.one tour ? :confused:

It's not the problem for shanks. If you're shanking, you're not hitting the ball properly. However, rackets do make a difference for many other aspects of tennis.

ronalditop
10-14-2009, 04:37 PM
It's not the problem for shanks. If you're shanking, you're not hitting the ball properly. However, rackets do make a difference for many other aspects of tennis.

Sorry but I disagree. I have seen players that play really good with one racquet and play a lot worse with another.

DudewithBabolat
10-14-2009, 05:03 PM
So, it might be because the racquet is too light, and i'm hitting the ball too early due to the light weight?

IStern
10-14-2009, 05:18 PM
So, it might be because the racquet is too light, and i'm hitting the ball too early due to the light weight?

No, it's because you're not keeping your head still and your eyes on the ball. Like everybody else said, proper footwork to get ready, and then *keep your eyes on the ball*

BullDogTennis
10-14-2009, 05:19 PM
The gods of tennis offer thee a comandment:

THOU SHALL KEEP THY HEAD STILL THROUGHOUT CONTACT AND BEYOND

+1....just keep your head still and don't try to swing HARD, but try and swing fast...

DudewithBabolat
10-14-2009, 05:34 PM
I'm pretty sure my footwork is fine, but i haven't payed attention to if my head moves or not, thanks for the suggestions, i'll keep you posted to see if this helps. And if i suddenly become a 6.0 player leading on to win Wimbly and the US Open, i'll know who to dedicate it to =D

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-14-2009, 05:58 PM
If frames makes no difference to you then why dont you just play with a 40 bucks walmart racquet instead of a 200 bucks k.six.one tour ? :confused:

Cause I care about maximal performance. And I don't pay 200 for my rackets. I pay 150 for each of them. :) With a K90, I feel the ball on the strings much better than with other rackets, the control is excellent, I can generate excellent amounts of spin, I can smack the ball all day long without sending it long over the baseline, and you can get some serious power off the stick!

I tried my old Prince CTS Approach Oversize when I was too lazy to string my rackets, and while it felt pretty comfortable and the performance was rather satisfactory, it didn't compare to my K90. The feel wasn't as great, the power wasn't consistent (if I took the biggest swing on the ball I could on a sitter, it performed VERY well, but otherwise the power off the strings wasn't very consistent), the spin also wasn't very consistent, and it just wasn't as consistent unless I took full out swings on EVERY ball. The problem with that is you need time that isn't always there. Otherwise I would've switched back. Then again, I can't find many CTS Approach Oversize rackets out there, so a bad choice anyways. It felt like if you hit it just right, the ball will come off the racket VERY well, but you need to be a pro to pull it off all the time.

I've been told I can perform very well regardless of what racket I'm given by my peers, and while I can still play well, it's not as comfortable as my K90 and I feel like I'm playing poorly. But the fact of the matter is I can still hit great shots, just not up to par with what I expect of myself with a K90.

It's not the problem for shanks. If you're shanking, you're not hitting the ball properly. However, rackets do make a difference for many other aspects of tennis.

He's right. Optimal performance and not being able to hit the ball on the strings are two HUGELY different things... Learn the difference or pick up the soon to be revealed update of the [K]One, which will cost you about 300-400 bucks! I'm sure it'll improve YOUR performance. :twisted:

Sorry but I disagree. I have seen players that play really good with one racquet and play a lot worse with another.

Like we said, performance and ability to hit the balls on the strings are two HUGELY different things. Were they shanking balls with the other racket? Probably not. If so, then they need some lessons and a lot of drilling to refine their strokes to be consistent. After you hit a level where consistency isn't a problem against people of your own level, rackets no longer matter when it comes to hitting the strings. Rackets merely enhance certain qualities of your game to allow you to play your best (or what you think and/or feel is your best).

DudewithBabolat
10-14-2009, 06:10 PM
Quick question, to confirm if my footing is right...
(right handed forehand)
left foot first in front of me, then i rotate my chest to the left, and my foot kind of leaves off the (ground except for my toes). Then my right shoulder rotates along with my chest, and i make contact with the ball, then when elbow starts to get in front of me, it bends.

I have no problem hitting my backhand though, it only hits the racquet on forehands.

DudewithBabolat
10-14-2009, 06:11 PM
granted, that may be because i have a 2H backhand =P

xFullCourtTenniSx
10-14-2009, 06:37 PM
Quick question, to confirm if my footing is right...
(right handed forehand)
left foot first in front of me, then i rotate my chest to the left, and my foot kind of leaves off the (ground except for my toes). Then my right shoulder rotates along with my chest, and i make contact with the ball, then when elbow starts to get in front of me, it bends.

I have no problem hitting my backhand though, it only hits the racquet on forehands.

Your elbow bend should not change until you have fully extended into your stroke (when you reach the farthest point forward in your swing). So if I play with a bent elbow, that bend shouldn't change for nearly the entire swing. If I play with a straight elbow, it should remain straight until I've finished extending forward towards the other court. Even then, my elbow doesn't bend until my arm comes completely across my front.

Aside from that, you should plant your back foot behind the ball, then swing. If you have even more time, take one more step forward into the ball, then swing. This is how you're supposed to hit a backhand, plant the back foot behind the ball, then step forward and across with the front foot into the ball and swing. For the forehand, your front foot shouldn't step across the back foot, but straight in front of it.

Video would help.

Nellie
10-14-2009, 06:52 PM
yes, you need to watch the ball until contact.

Tankari
10-14-2009, 07:03 PM
To the OP, you already answered your own question. Just get one of these: http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=293258. All jokes aside though watch how the guy demonstrating about 1:55 has his head still while keeping his eyes on the point of contact before and after hitting the ball.

DudewithBabolat
10-15-2009, 02:14 PM
It's $200 dollars!, and I was the poster of that thread. Anyway, would a thinner racquet, like the SV ProStaff mid 85 help? And i have trouble looking at the ball, because i feel like whenever i look at it, I'm not concentrating on power delivery, resulting in weaker shots =[, i do hear you though, power does nothing without control. I'll try it out, as i'm playing tennis tomorrow, yay for Fridays!