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View Full Version : How many string jobs before deciding on a potential frame?


Ross K
10-20-2009, 02:29 AM
Basically, I'm wondering if I might have acted a bit hastily over the years...

What I mean is: say you like a frame enough to want to play/check it out further but you're by no means 100 per cent sure and you definitely want to give it a different string job (and perhaps mod it up with lead, put on different grips, etc), how many new string jobs before deciding and either casting it aside and saying, "No. Not quite for me," or, "Yes. This is The One!"

Thanks

R.

skyzoo
10-20-2009, 02:40 AM
Basically, I'm wondering if I might have acted a bit hastily over the years...

What I mean is: say you like a frame enough to want to play/check it out further but you're by no means 100 per cent sure and you definitely want to give it a different string job (and perhaps mod it up with lead, put on different grips, etc), how many new string jobs before deciding and either casting it aside and saying, "No. Not quite for me," or, "Yes. This is The One!"

Thanks

R.
I ussually go with instinct. I tried the prestige pro and for some reason or another went with the radical pro. But when I tested my friends Prestige it had a string set-up comparable to mine and I loved it. All you need is to string it up with what strings you ussually use, adjust the tension to fit the frame and give it a try.

bad_call
10-20-2009, 03:19 AM
Basically, I'm wondering if I might have acted a bit hastily over the years...

What I mean is: say you like a frame enough to want to play/check it out further but you're by no means 100 per cent sure and you definitely want to give it a different string job (and perhaps mod it up with lead, put on different grips, etc), how many new string jobs before deciding and either casting it aside and saying, "No. Not quite for me," or, "Yes. This is The One!"

Thanks

R.

the more you know about strings/tension, the fewer string jobs you can get to finding out if the racquet is for you. if not knowledgeable about such then suggest consulting one who is...that will be $.02 for this. :)

Ross K
10-20-2009, 04:00 AM
No, I don't deny it - I'm not knowledgeable. TBH for a long time I used to rely heavily on the advice of my ex-stringer. There are definitely some examples though where I now realize maybe I could have done with experimenting more. I would also add that if you're a bit of a racketaholic like me, you would have tested a wide range of very contrasting frames, which complicates things a little more imo.

R.

bad_call
10-20-2009, 04:04 AM
maybe make a list of issues per racquet along with accompanying strings/tension at the time of testing. this data could then be examined by a "string" person to see if corrections are acceptable.

Rabbit
10-20-2009, 04:13 AM
With as many racquets as there are out there, if it doesn't feel "right" from the getgo....try another....

Meaghan
10-20-2009, 09:30 AM
its a good question Ross....
I think for most of us we can tell in 5 mins whether we like the frame.
As for strings I have a favoured hybrid, full poly and full multi set up and a particular tension range.
I have always gone for the hybrid and If i liked the frame and feel I would kinda know whether it would work with a full multi or poly.
So my answer If i liked the frame would be 2 string jobs.
Saying that I would have to be real keen on the frame, like this is the 'one'!

Ross K
10-20-2009, 11:44 AM
With as many racquets as there are out there, if it doesn't feel "right" from the getgo....try another....

Well... LOL!... yes, up until now, that's certainly been my usual way of looking at it!

Rabbit
10-21-2009, 09:26 AM
Well... LOL!... yes, up until now, that's certainly been my usual way of looking at it!

LOL...the thing is, I wasn't trying to be funny. I have just decided that the biggest single factor involved in using a new racquet quite simply can be summed up in one word:

COMMITMENT

Commitment to make the change and get used to the new frame is 90% of the process IMO. I think you can near about play with any racquet out there. You may not play well, but if you're commited enough to play with let's say Federer or Nadal's racquet because you think they are the cat's pajamas, you can. Finding a frame which feels "right" is the key and I don't know that any amount of stringing is going to make a really bad racquet choice feel right. Now, it's true that the wrong string in the right racquet can make for a terrible experience.

But when hitting with a racquet, don't you sort of know within a couple or three minutes if the racquet is a good choice for you? I know I do. Hell, I remember hitting exactly one ball with the Pure Drive and RDX500 and thinking "nope".

And truthfully, other than some brief dalliances (and spending too much damn money), I keep coming back to the C10. The racquet is just perfect for me and my game. It has all the right factors for me. It is a higher powered player's frame, it has tons of plough, it has an open string pattern, it has a ton of control, and it has great feel. It simply is the PF Flyer of frames for me. The only thing I was looking for was all this in a slightly lighter package, but I've decided that as I move into my 50s, if I'm just not determined to stay in shape, I'm going to have to struggle with getting tired in 100 degree heat from time to time. :) And, I've had other interests of late with my daughter going off to college and playing soccer along with the damn weather and damn work.