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mark999
10-22-2009, 10:33 AM
i normally do not wear eyeglasses when playing tennis at present, but need to start. i wear progressive lenses at present. should i use progressive lenses while playing tennis or simply get regular lenses. i'm near sighted plus i need reading glasses.

mike53
10-22-2009, 10:38 AM
I would think that regular lenses would work since I wear reading glasses for reading, but never for tennis. Just be sure that the lenses and frames are "shatterproof".

marsh
10-22-2009, 12:04 PM
I had to learn to wear contacts. I still don't like them, but they are substantially better than wearing glasses.

Geezer Guy
10-22-2009, 01:21 PM
I wear progressives, and when I first got them I tried to wear them for sports. No luck. Now, if I'm doing anything with a moving ball, frisbee, or whatever, first thing I do is take off the glasses. I don't play golf, but that would probably be OK since the ball is stationary.

I haven't had any complaints about line calls, but I've always been pretty generous in that category.

TourTenor
10-22-2009, 01:58 PM
I wear progressives when I play tennis and they seem to work just fine.

SystemicAnomaly
10-22-2009, 02:38 PM
i normally do not wear eyeglasses when playing tennis at present, but need to start. i wear progressive lenses at present. should i use progressive lenses while playing tennis or simply get regular lenses. i'm near sighted plus i need reading glasses.

Confused. Why do you need reading glasses if you are near-sighted?

It is something of a moot point anyway 'cuz you don't really need your near vision all that much for tennis. Most balls in motion will essentially be invisible to the eyes when they are within a meter or two of us -- our visual tracking systems are incapable of (smooth pursuit) tracking for a moving ball in close proximity -- even balls traveling less than 20 mph.

Best to use correction for medium and distant viewing I would think.
.

neverstopplaying
10-22-2009, 02:46 PM
I recently had Lasik surgery but wore progressives for a few years. I could never play tennis with progressive lenses. I had glasses made with my distance prescription only that I used just for tennis and was very pleased with them.

TourTenor
10-22-2009, 02:56 PM
Confused. Why do you need reading glasses if you are near-sighted?

It is something of a moot point anyway 'cuz you don't really need your near vision all that much for tennis. Most balls in motion will essentially be invisible to the eyes when they are whink a meter or two of us -- our visual tracking systems are incapable of (smooth pursuit) tracking for a moving ball in close proximity -- even balls traveling less than 20 mph.

Best to use correction for medium and distant viewing I would think.
Near-sighted does not mean that you can read without help. I have been near-sighted for most of my life and, as I got older needed to add the readers to help my close up vision. Is it a pain? Yes, but you do what you have to do.

I do agree with your moot point/tracking the ball discussion. I don't have any problem tracking my toss on a serve either.

Re: Progressives ... They took a little while to get used to. Most of my early issues with them had to do with watching my step on staircases, not playing tennis.

SystemicAnomaly
10-22-2009, 03:05 PM
Near-sighted does not mean that you can read without help. I have been near-sighted for most of my life and, as I got older needed to add the readers to help my close up vision...

So near-sighted really isn't near-sighted? If you are near-sighted & need optical assistance for seeing near, shouldn't we call this something else? I was actually trying to determin if the OP had an astigmantism or some other visual impairment.

TourTenor
10-22-2009, 03:13 PM
So near-sighted really isn't near-sighted? If you are near-sighted & need optical assistance for seeing near, shouldn't we call this something else? I was actually trying to determin if the OP had an astigmantism or some other visual impairment.
No, it really is near-sighted or, it is really near-sighted! Sadly, my clearest vision without glasses is about 3 inches from my nose. I actually see better without my readers up to that distance. Past 3 inches, I need my readers.

chess9
10-22-2009, 03:26 PM
My eye doctor prescribed de-tuned contacts for tennis. My prescription is -3.25 normally (both eyes) but he gave me 3.00. That allows me to see closer balls slightly better.

-Robert

SystemicAnomaly
10-22-2009, 03:42 PM
No, it really is near-sighted or, it is really near-sighted! Sadly, my clearest vision without glasses is about 3 inches from my nose. I actually see better without my readers up to that distance. Past 3 inches, I need my readers.

Ok, we are talking about degrees of myopia here -- low myopia vs high myopia. This is insteresting 'cuz I've got the opposite problem -- as an object gets nearer, I experience greater difficulty in focusing. I assumed that this was a natural progression as one got older.

My dominant eye has become "far-sighted" due to trauma (ball impact) and age. My other eye seems to be best with middle distances -- not as good with distant objects or very near objects (book reading distances), but very good at monitor reading distances. Guess that I'm (partially) hyperopic or presbyopic.

TourTenor
10-22-2009, 04:16 PM
Ok, we are talking about degrees of myopia here -- low myopia vs high myopia. This is insteresting 'cuz I've got the opposite problem -- as an object gets nearer, I experience greater difficulty in focusing. I assumed that this was a natural progression as one got older.

My dominant eye has become "far-sighted" due to trauma (ball impact) and age. My other eye seems to be best with middle distances -- not as good with distant objects or very near objects (book reading distances), but very good at monitor reading distances. Guess that I'm (partially) hyperopic or presbyopic.
Neither of my eyes are far-sighted. Without my glasses, I couldn't play tennis at all. One eye has always dominated (slightly) over the other. My right eye was better than my left until I suffered and repaired a detached retina. Now my left eye is slightly dominant over my right.

SystemicAnomaly
10-22-2009, 05:02 PM
Neither of my eyes are far-sighted. Without my glasses, I couldn't play tennis at all. One eye has always dominated (slightly) over the other. My right eye was better than my left until I suffered and repaired a detached retina. Now my left eye is slightly dominant over my right.

Interesting. My left eye remains dominant even tho' it has sustained greater injury than the right. I've partially detached both retinas, but the greater problem was the left one. The problems partially repaired themselves but my near vision has deteriorated (partly due to age, but more due to trauma, I believe). I've thought about trying to make my right eye dominant since it is better with middle and near distances than the left. Not sure how easy this would be to do since my left is much better with far vision than my "reading eye".

mark999
10-22-2009, 05:08 PM
thanks for all the comments. i will probably go with regular distance glasses. i would love to try contacts but i have very dry eyes. the right side of my face is also partially paralysed from a tumor i had removed so my right eye does not blink very well and constantly needs artificial tears to keep from drying out.

Blake0
10-22-2009, 05:14 PM
You guys are confusing me..:???:..doesn't near sighted mean..
Definition
Myopia is the medical term for nearsightedness. People with myopia see objects more clearly when they are close to the eye, while distant objects appear blurred or fuzzy. Reading and close-up work may be clear, but distance vision is blurry

volusiano
10-22-2009, 06:40 PM
^^^ There's another term called presbyopia, which is a "condition where the eyes exhibit a progressively diminishing ability to focus on near objects with age." It's a natural condition of aging like gray hair or wrinkles. It starts happening to people in their forties. It's not curable with Lasik.

If you're near sighted and wear glasses, you get 20/20 vision through your lenses. But when you read up close through those lenses, your eyes still need to refocus for the reading (just like a normal-vision person does). When presbyopia sets in, both you (with your 20/20 correction lens) and a normal-vision person will need reading glasses just the same because neither of you has the ability to refocus your eyes on near objects anymore. Maybe you'll have a lighter reading glass prescription than the normal-vision person because you're near-sighted, but you'll need them just as well. That's why you see people wear bifocals, to give them both the near-sighted correction and close-up reading correction all in one lens.

Tankari
10-22-2009, 06:52 PM
I'm near sighted and would think contact lenses would be better than glasses, does anybody else think so? I've heard contact lenses have better peripheral vision and my main gripe with glasses is when they fog up during the winter months.

Ken Honecker
10-22-2009, 11:09 PM
When I was in my tennis youth I wore regular glasses for my near sightedness. Now I am 52 and wearing progressive lens and haven't noticed any problem with them in either tennis or softball.

charliefedererer
10-23-2009, 09:19 PM
Another aspect to consider is how much of your visual field is covered by the lens.
"Wraparound" glasses will give you much better vision if you use a closed stance, so you are not looking out past the edge of the lens, or at the egde of the frame. Even with an open stance, as you rotate your core back, your head pivots to stay straight, and you can have the same issue of looking sideways out of the glasses shortly before striking the ball.
Also some glasses have a big gap near the nosepiece that similarly can reduce the field of corrected vision.
Even large nose pads can restrict your view of the ball.
Also to reduce the amount of glare/light reaching your eye, its good to have lenses that fit your faceat the top, sides and bottom.
All of the Oakley sunglasses (many base eight) can be obtained with clear lenses.
Oakley and Bolle also have base 4.5-6 regular eyeglass frames.

SystemicAnomaly
10-24-2009, 03:42 AM
You guys are confusing me..:???:..doesn't near sighted mean..
Definition
Myopia is the medical term for nearsightedness. People with myopia see objects more clearly when they are close to the eye, while distant objects appear blurred or fuzzy. Reading and close-up work may be clear, but distance vision is blurry

This is a very general description of myopia. One can have various degrees of myopia. For instance, someone might have a mild myopia where reading a book might not present any problem but reading a monitor or a blackboard would be difficult. If one has a higher degree of myopia they might be able to focus on an object very close to their face but might needing reading glasses for reading a book or a monitor.

Jay_The_Nomad
10-24-2009, 05:46 AM
If you've got dry eyes, you can wear sunglasses to help make contact lenses more comfortable.

I've got slight myopia, so I need to wear contacts when playing tennis at night (unless i'm using Slazenger high viz balls or playing on certain courts with good lighting).. and to counter the dry-eyes problem, I wear clear safety glasses to play.

Quite a few people thought I was a bit of a poseur for wearing transparent shades at night, but really its for functional reasons haha.

moroni
10-24-2009, 06:12 AM
I wear contacts while playing glasses just get in the way and distract me so wear contacs they should gwt you going...

luthertn
10-24-2009, 06:29 AM
I been playing tennis with glasses, its seem okay. Just hate it when I get sweaty my glasses slip but now it dont no more. I also have contacts but when i wear them for a long period of time my eyes get red ...hmmmm

mark999
10-24-2009, 08:29 AM
i already wear clear lenses to protect my eyes from drying out. the facial paralysis on the right side of my face makes it impossible to wear contacts. normally i have to put drops in my right eye every 15 minutes.

PBODY99
10-24-2009, 06:06 PM
I have used a single vision distance lens all my playing days. Bolle's with a Rx insert have saved me on a couple of occasions, when an errant shot caught me in the eye. As a biker, I know the value of a shatter resistant lens when something might hit your eyes.

aimr75
10-24-2009, 06:34 PM
I wear regular glasses all the time and for tennis.. never really had any issues as far as sweat or them fogging up or issues with peripheral vision..

jswinf
10-26-2009, 02:22 PM
As an optometrist, I can say that people differ. (Profound, huh?) But a lot of people tend to think that the way they see and the type of vision correction that works best for them is the same for everybody.

If you play with glasses for distance only, progressive lenses, contact lenses, or no correction and feel like you see OK, it's OK. If you have both progressive glasses and glasses for distance only, makes sense to use the distance ones for tennis, you're really not going to be reading the trademark on the ball. If glasses bug you for active stuff, try contact lenses.

My point is if you're comfortable with your vision there's probably no "Magic Solution" that would make you play a lot better. That's a job for a new racket. And that doesn't really work for me, either.

SystemicAnomaly
10-26-2009, 02:33 PM
As an optometrist, I can say that people differ...

My point is if you're comfortable with your vision there's probably no "Magic Solution" that would make you play a lot better. That's a job for a new racket. And that doesn't really work for me, either.

How about those performance-enhancing contact lenses used by baseball players? I recall stories about these uber-lenses 4 or 5 yrs ago. Check out the story on the following badminton web site (I posted a several replies in that thread):

badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23771 (http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23771)
.

jswinf
10-26-2009, 08:51 PM
Haven't heard so much about those contact lenses lately. They had quite a bit of tint, wouldn't think they'd be good for playing under lights. Otherwise, fine if they float your boat, not magic. Could do the same with specs or shades like Rickey Henderson used to, plus they're easier to take off when the sun goes down.

SystemicAnomaly
10-27-2009, 07:07 AM
Haven't heard so much about those contact lenses lately. They had quite a bit of tint, wouldn't think they'd be good for playing under lights. Otherwise, fine if they float your boat, not magic. Could do the same with specs or shades like Rickey Henderson used to, plus they're easier to take off when the sun goes down.

I've never tried the performance-enhancing contact lenses myself. However, I am interested in hearing any feedback that anyone might have on these.

mike53
10-27-2009, 07:32 AM
I wouldn't recommend contacts to anyone for a variety of reasons, but everyone should make their own decision. My wife uses Oakely frames and they have performed exceptionally well over the years, but they were pretty expensive to get into. However, if cost is not a limiting factor, this is what I'd be getting:

http://www.framesdirect.com/Oakley-Prescription-sunglasses-prescsgp/rxsgp-lamfmi-s-l-k-k-tcqjpf.html

SystemicAnomaly
10-27-2009, 08:01 AM
I wouldn't recommend contacts to anyone for a variety of reasons, but everyone should make their own decision. My wife uses Oakely frames and they have performed exceptionally well over the years, but they were pretty expensive to get into. However, if cost is not a limiting factor, this is what I'd be getting:

http://www.framesdirect.com/Oakley-Prescription-sunglasses-prescsgp/rxsgp-lamfmi-s-l-k-k-tcqjpf.html

Eyeglasses tend to refract light much more than contact lenses. This can be a problem for ppl who only use glasses occasionally. The tennis ball doesn't seem to be exactly where you think it is. If you use the eyeglasses for a while, however, your brain learns to correct for the refraction.

I don't play during the day much so I am not in the habit of using sunglasses. Whenever, I do put on the glasses, I'll mishit the ball for a while until my brain corrects for the altered image.

mike53
10-27-2009, 08:12 AM
The tennis ball doesn't seem to be exactly where you think it is.


Without a doubt. There is also a certain amount of distortion over the surface of even the most perfect lens and eyeglasses have a much larger lens surface. My concern with contacts stems from some specific safety considerations. Their performance is great.

SystemicAnomaly
10-27-2009, 08:18 AM
Without a doubt. There is also a certain amount of distortion over the surface of even the most perfect lens and eyeglasses have a much larger lens surface.

Yeah, good point. I believe that Oakleys, altho' they still refract the light, have considerably less of this other distortion over the surface of their lenses than cheaper glasses do.

Note that thicker glasses will have a greater refraction than thinner ones.

mike53
10-27-2009, 08:23 AM
Yeah, good point. I believe that Oakleys, altho' they still refract the light, have considerably less of this other distortion over the surface of their lenses than cheaper glasses do.

Note that thicker glasses will have a greater refraction than thinner ones.

That's what they say and my observations would agree, but they are definitely not perfect. And the thinner lenses are certainly more expensive.

siata94
11-17-2009, 10:39 AM
I prefer prescription sunglasses for daytime, contacts when playing under the lights. Regular prescription glasses don't work for me under lights; too much diffraction and sweat/fog make it impossible to see unless I clean them very thoroughly each time (practically every point). I don't get any fogging playing in the daytime w/ the sunglasses and a quick wipe of sweat drips and it's good to go again. Don't notice any diffractions. I always get the thinnest lenses possible and polarized coatings for sunglasses.

I dislike contacts but if I wore them for daytime, I'd wear shades over them anyway, my eyes are somewhat sensitive to brightness even on an overcast day.

EKnee08
11-17-2009, 11:07 AM
i normally do not wear eyeglasses when playing tennis at present, but need to start. i wear progressive lenses at present. should i use progressive lenses while playing tennis or simply get regular lenses. i'm near sighted plus i need reading glasses.

I wear progressives as my regular glasses and have a special pair that I had made up just for tennis. I can not wear contacts. I have always been nearsighted but as I approach 50 need glasses for reading as well, hence the progressives.
I never had an adjustment to wearing progressives,the transition was instinctual but I believe you see a tennis ball better on a tennis court just with regular distance glasses. You are not placing small print close to your eyes while playing tennis. If you look down or in certain directions, you may not see the tennis ball as clearly and you may not have the time to adjust with the progressives when a ball comes zooming your way as fast as you like with the progressives on a tennis court.
Thus, I use lightweight, rimless swissflex frames on the tennis court, with transition lenses that adjust to the light so I can wear them in various and changing lightning conditions outside including sunlight.

snr
11-17-2009, 11:41 AM
I can..but prefer contacts more.

I used to exclusively play with glasses (though I did wear contacts at hte time..just not for tennis lol), but after a while wroe contacts.

Seeing that I wear contacts often anyway (Started when I started skiing), it doesn't bother me..